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Special Issue "Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Patrizia Russo

IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Area of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, 00166 Rome, Italy
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Interests: Applied biology,nicotinic receptor in cancer, COPD, addiction, Alzheimer, systems medicine
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Massimo Fini

Scientific Direction, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome, Italy
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Phone: 06-6613-0405
Interests: Systems medicine, aging, frailty, rehabilitation, cardiovascular

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolic disorder refers to a cluster of metabolic abnormalities (i.e., insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, high cholesterol and high blood pressure) that may occur in the same individual. The metabolic disorder is a rising global emergency. Metabolites and small molecules are arranged in biochemical pathways forming a large metabolic network that are regulated by various genetic and signaling networks.A better understanding of disease-associated metabolic pathways alterations may lead to the identification of new drugs and to the development of new therapies. Marine natural products are a source of antihypertensive, antioxidative, antithrombotic and antihyperglycemic agents possibly useful in the treatment or in the prevention of metabolic disorders. As Guest Editors, we invite researchers to provide recent advances in the attractive field of marine natural products targeting metabolic disorders.

Prof. Dr. Patrizia Russo
Prof. Dr. Massimo Fini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolic disorders
  • metabolic pathways
  • marine organisms
  • peptides
  • molecular structures
  • biological activity
  • applications
  • physiological roles
  • metabolomics
  • genomics
  • system biology

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Dioxinodehydroeckol Enhances the Differentiation of Osteoblasts by Regulating the Expression of Phospho-Smad1/5/8
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(9), 168; doi:10.3390/md14090168
Received: 9 June 2016 / Revised: 1 September 2016 / Accepted: 7 September 2016 / Published: 14 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Lack of bone formation-related health problems are a major problem for the aging population in the modern world. As a part of the ongoing trend of developing natural substances that attenuate osteoporotic bone loss conditions, dioxinodehydroeckol (DHE) from edible brown alga Ecklonia cava
[...] Read more.
Lack of bone formation-related health problems are a major problem for the aging population in the modern world. As a part of the ongoing trend of developing natural substances that attenuate osteoporotic bone loss conditions, dioxinodehydroeckol (DHE) from edible brown alga Ecklonia cava was tested for its effects on osteoblastogenic differentiation in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts. DHE was observed to successfully enhance osteoblast differentiation, as indicated by elevated cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, intracellular cell mineralization, along with raised levels of osteoblastogenesis indicators at the concentration of 20 μM. Results suggested a possible intervening of DHE on the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, according to elevated protein levels of BMP-2, collagen-I, and Smads. In addition, the presence of DHE was also able to raise the phosphorylated extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) levels which are also activated by the BMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, DHE is suggested to be a potential bioactive compound against bone loss that could enhance osteoblastogenesis with a suggested BMP pathway interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle Undaria pinnatifida and Fucoxanthin Ameliorate Lipogenesis and Markers of Both Inflammation and Cardiovascular Dysfunction in an Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(8), 148; doi:10.3390/md14080148
Received: 27 May 2016 / Revised: 7 July 2016 / Accepted: 29 July 2016 / Published: 3 August 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Brown algae and its carotenoids have been shown to have a positive influence on obesity and its comorbidities. This study evaluated the effect of Undaria pinnatifida and fucoxanthin on biochemical, physiological and inflammation markers related to obesity and on the expression of genes
[...] Read more.
Brown algae and its carotenoids have been shown to have a positive influence on obesity and its comorbidities. This study evaluated the effect of Undaria pinnatifida and fucoxanthin on biochemical, physiological and inflammation markers related to obesity and on the expression of genes engaged on white adipose tissue lipid metabolism in a murine model of diet-induced obesity. The treatments improved energy expenditure, β-oxidation and adipogenesis by upregulating PPARα, PGC1α, PPARγ and UCP-1. Adipogenesis was also confirmed by image analysis of the retroperitoneal adipose tissue, by measuring cell area, perimeter and cellular density. Additionally, the treatments, ameliorated adipose tissue accumulation, insulin resistance, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum, and reduced lipogenesis and inflammation by downregulating acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) gene expression, increasing serum concentration and expression of adiponectin as well as downregulating IL-6 expression. Both fucoxanthin and Undaria pinnatifida may be considered for treating obesity and other diseases related. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle Metals of Deep Ocean Water Increase the Anti-Adipogenesis Effect of Monascus-Fermented Product via Modulating the Monascin and Ankaflavin Production
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(6), 106; doi:10.3390/md14060106
Received: 8 April 2016 / Revised: 17 May 2016 / Accepted: 20 May 2016 / Published: 27 May 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3385 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Deep ocean water (DOW) obtained from a depth of more than 200 m includes abundant nutrients and minerals. DOW was proven to positively increase monascin (MS) and ankaflavin (AK) production and the anti-adipogenesis effect of Monascus-fermented red mold dioscorea (RMD). However, the
[...] Read more.
Deep ocean water (DOW) obtained from a depth of more than 200 m includes abundant nutrients and minerals. DOW was proven to positively increase monascin (MS) and ankaflavin (AK) production and the anti-adipogenesis effect of Monascus-fermented red mold dioscorea (RMD). However, the influences that the major metals in DOW have on Monascus secondary metabolite biosynthesis and anti-adipogenesis remain unknown. Therefore, the major metals in DOW were used as the culture water to produce RMD. The secondary metabolites production and anti-adipogenesis effect of RMD cultured with various individual metal waters were investigated. In the results, the addition of water with Mg, Ca, Zn, and Fe increased MS and AK production and inhibited mycotoxin citrinin (CT). However, the positive influence may be contributed to the regulation of pigment biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the results of cell testing, higher lipogenesis inhibition was seen in the treatments of various ethanol extracts of RMD cultured with water containing Mg, K, Zn, and Fe than in those of RMD cultured with ultra-pure water. In conclusion, various individual metals resulted in different effects on MS and AK productions as well as the anti-adipogenesis effect of RMD, but the specific metals contained in DOW may cause synergistic or comprehensive effects that increase the significantly positive influence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
Open AccessArticle Simultaneous Determination of Fucoxanthin and Its Deacetylated Metabolite Fucoxanthinol in Rat Plasma by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Mar. Drugs 2015, 13(10), 6521-6536; doi:10.3390/md13106521
Received: 28 August 2015 / Revised: 28 August 2015 / Accepted: 5 October 2015 / Published: 23 October 2015
PDF Full-text (1321 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fucoxanthin and its deacetylated metabolite fucoxanthinol are two major carotenoids that have been confirmed to possess various pharmacological properties. In the present study, fucoxanthinol was identified as the deacetylated metabolite of fucoxanthin, after intravenous (i.v.) and intragastric gavage (i.g.) administration to rats at
[...] Read more.
Fucoxanthin and its deacetylated metabolite fucoxanthinol are two major carotenoids that have been confirmed to possess various pharmacological properties. In the present study, fucoxanthinol was identified as the deacetylated metabolite of fucoxanthin, after intravenous (i.v.) and intragastric gavage (i.g.) administration to rats at doses of 2 and 65 mg/kg, respectively, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Next, an accurate and precise LC-MS/MS method was developed to quantitatively determine fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol in rat plasma. Plasma samples were resolved by LC-MS/MS on a reverse-phase SB-C18 column that was equilibrated and eluted with acetonitrile (A)/aqueous 0.1% formic acid (B; 92/8, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Analytes were monitored by multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) under positive electrospray ionization mode. The precursor/product transitions (m/z) were 659.3→109.0 for fucoxanthin, 617.2→109.0 for fucoxanthinol, and 429.4→313.2 for the internal standard (IS). Calibration curves for fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol were linear over concentrations ranging from 1.53 to 720 and 1.17 to 600 ng/mL, respectively. The inter- and intraday accuracy and precision were within ±15%. The method was applied successfully in a pharmacokinetic study and the resulting oral fucoxanthin bioavailability calculated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Metabolic Disorder in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients: Towards a Personalized Approach Using Marine Drug Derivatives
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(3), 81; doi:10.3390/md15030081
Received: 22 November 2016 / Revised: 23 February 2017 / Accepted: 15 March 2017 / Published: 20 March 2017
PDF Full-text (3209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metabolic disorder has been frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, the exact correlation between obesity, which is a complex metabolic disorder, and COPD remains controversial. The current study summarizes a variety of drugs from marine sources that have anti-obesity
[...] Read more.
Metabolic disorder has been frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, the exact correlation between obesity, which is a complex metabolic disorder, and COPD remains controversial. The current study summarizes a variety of drugs from marine sources that have anti-obesity effects and proposed potential mechanisms by which lung function can be modulated with the anti-obesity activity. Considering the similar mechanism, such as inflammation, shared between obesity and COPD, the study suggests that marine derivatives that act on the adipose tissues to reduce inflammation may provide beneficial therapeutic effects in COPD subjects with high body mass index (BMI). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
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Open AccessReview Marine Algae as a Potential Source for Anti-Obesity Agents
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(12), 222; doi:10.3390/md14120222
Received: 28 September 2016 / Revised: 30 November 2016 / Accepted: 1 December 2016 / Published: 7 December 2016
PDF Full-text (261 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obesity is a major epidemic that poses a worldwide threat to human health, as it is also associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Therapeutic intervention through weight loss drugs, accompanied by diet and exercise, is one of the options
[...] Read more.
Obesity is a major epidemic that poses a worldwide threat to human health, as it is also associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Therapeutic intervention through weight loss drugs, accompanied by diet and exercise, is one of the options for the treatment and management of obesity. However, the only approved anti-obesity drug currently available in the market is orlistat, a synthetic inhibitor of pancreatic lipase. Other anti-obesity drugs are still being evaluated at different stages of clinical trials, while some have been withdrawn due to their severe adverse effects. Thus, there is a need to look for new anti-obesity agents, especially from biological sources. Marine algae, especially seaweeds are a promising source of anti-obesity agents. Four major bioactive compounds from seaweeds which have the potential as anti-obesity agents are fucoxanthin, alginates, fucoidans and phlorotannins. The anti-obesity effects of such compounds are due to several mechanisms, which include the inhibition of lipid absorption and metabolism (e.g., fucoxanthin and fucoidans), effect on satiety feeling (e.g., alginates), and inhibition of adipocyte differentiation (e.g., fucoxanthin). Further studies, especially testing bioactive compounds in long-term human trials are required before any new anti-obesity drugs based on algal products can be developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
Open AccessReview Marine Organisms with Anti-Diabetes Properties
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(12), 220; doi:10.3390/md14120220
Received: 30 September 2016 / Revised: 16 November 2016 / Accepted: 22 November 2016 / Published: 1 December 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (746 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Diabetes is a chronic degenerative metabolic disease with high morbidity and mortality rates caused by its complications. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in looking for new bioactive compounds to treat this disease, including metabolites of marine origin. Several aquatic
[...] Read more.
Diabetes is a chronic degenerative metabolic disease with high morbidity and mortality rates caused by its complications. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in looking for new bioactive compounds to treat this disease, including metabolites of marine origin. Several aquatic organisms have been screened to evaluate their possible anti-diabetes activities, such as bacteria, microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, sponges, corals, sea anemones, fish, salmon skin, a shark fusion protein as well as fish and shellfish wastes. Both in vitro and in vivo screenings have been used to test anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of marine organisms. This review summarizes recent discoveries in anti-diabetes properties of several marine organisms as well as marine wastes, existing patents and possible future research directions in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
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Open AccessReview Nutraceuticals and Bioactive Components from Fish for Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction
Mar. Drugs 2016, 14(6), 113; doi:10.3390/md14060113
Received: 9 March 2016 / Revised: 11 May 2016 / Accepted: 26 May 2016 / Published: 8 June 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1466 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease remains the most common health problem in developed countries, and residual risk after implementing all current therapies is still high. Permanent changes in lifestyle may be hard to achieve and people may not always be motivated enough to make the recommended
[...] Read more.
Cardiovascular disease remains the most common health problem in developed countries, and residual risk after implementing all current therapies is still high. Permanent changes in lifestyle may be hard to achieve and people may not always be motivated enough to make the recommended modifications. Emerging research has explored the application of natural food-based strategies in disease management. In recent years, much focus has been placed on the beneficial effects of fish consumption. Many of the positive effects of fish consumption on dyslipidemia and heart diseases have been attributed to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs, i.e., EPA and DHA); however, fish is also an excellent source of protein and, recently, fish protein hydrolysates containing bioactive peptides have shown promising activities for the prevention/management of cardiovascular disease and associated health complications. The present review will focus on n-3 PUFAs and bioactive peptides effects on cardiovascular disease risk factors. Moreover, since considerable controversy exists regarding the association between n-3 PUFAs and major cardiovascular endpoints, we have also reviewed the main clinical trials supporting or not this association. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products that Target Metabolic Disorders)
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