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Special Issue "Innovative Materials in Civil Constructions"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Luciano Feo

Department of Civil Engineering and Nano_Mates Center, University of Salerno, 84084 – Fisciano (SA), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: numerical and experimental analysis of materials and structures; structural strengthening of existing structures with FRP composite; materials; FRP composites bonded and bolted joints; NanoMaterials and NanoTechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For decades, civil engineers have dealt with different types of composite materials, including wood (natural composites), plywood (laminated natural composites), and concrete (particular composites).

The noteworthy mechanical properties of advanced composite materials, as for instance high values of specific stiffness, specific strength and high corrosion resistance, have made these materials very appealing for civil engineering applications. In recent year, several major national and international research programs were launched to investigate the feasibility of using advanced polymer composites on both seismic and environment-sensitive fields. This includes the use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as internal/or external reinforcement, as well as building entire structures, such as bridges and industrial frame-structures, from FRP materials.

The main aim of this special issue is to cover a wide range of critical topics concerning the use of innovative materials in the civil construction industry. This includes micro and macro modeling, mechanical characterization, overall performance, durability and long term behavior, as well as analysis and design.

Prof. Dr. Luciano Feo
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP)
  • Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC)
  • Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars (FRPB)
  • Structural strengthening of existing reinforced concrete (RC) and masonry structures
  • New constructions entirely made from FRP pultruded elements
  • Structural behavior of pultruded fiber reinforced polymer (PFRP) connections

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Concrete Open-Wall Systems Wrapped with FRP under Torsional Loads
Materials 2012, 5(11), 2055-2068; doi:10.3390/ma5112055
Received: 24 September 2012 / Revised: 18 October 2012 / Accepted: 19 October 2012 / Published: 25 October 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (247 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The static behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams plated with layers of fiber-reinforced composite material (FRP) is widely investigated in current literature, which deals with both its numerical modeling as well as experiments. Scientific interest in this topic is explained by the increasing
[...] Read more.
The static behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams plated with layers of fiber-reinforced composite material (FRP) is widely investigated in current literature, which deals with both its numerical modeling as well as experiments. Scientific interest in this topic is explained by the increasing widespread use of composite materials in retrofitting techniques, as well as the consolidation and upgrading of existing reinforced concrete elements to new service conditions. The effectiveness of these techniques is typically influenced by the debonding of the FRP at the interface with concrete, where the transfer of stresses occurs from one element (RC member) to the other (FRP strengthening). In fact, the activation of the well-known premature failure modes can be regarded as a consequence of high peak values of the interfacial interactions. Until now, typical applications of FRP structural plating have included cases of flexural or shear-flexural strengthening. Within this context, the present study aims at extending the investigation to the case of wall-systems with open cross-section under torsional loads. It includes the results of some numerical analyses carried out by means of a finite element approximation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Materials in Civil Constructions)
Open AccessArticle Bond Behavior of Historical Clay Bricks Strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymers (SRP)
Materials 2011, 4(3), 585-600; doi:10.3390/ma4030585
Received: 18 February 2011 / Accepted: 18 March 2011 / Published: 21 March 2011
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (727 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the strengthening interventions of past and historical masonry constructions, the non-standardized manufacture processes, the ageing and the damage of masonry units, could significantly affect the properties of the surfaces where strengthening materials are applied. This aspect requires particular care in evaluating the
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In the strengthening interventions of past and historical masonry constructions, the non-standardized manufacture processes, the ageing and the damage of masonry units, could significantly affect the properties of the surfaces where strengthening materials are applied. This aspect requires particular care in evaluating the performance of externally bonded strengthening layers, especially with reference to the detachment mechanism. The bond response of old masonries could be very different from that occurring in new masonry units which are the ones generally considered in most of the bond tests available in technical literature. The aim of the present paper is the study of the bond behavior of historical clay bricks strengthened with steel reinforced polymers (SRP) materials. In particular, the results of an experimental study concerning new manufactured clay bricks and old bricks extracted from different historical masonry buildings are presented. The obtained results, particularly in terms of bond resistance, detachment mechanism and strain distributions, are discussed for the purpose of analyzing the peculiarities of the historical bricks in comparison with new manufactured ones. Some considerations on the efficacy of the theoretical formulations of the recent Italian code are also carried out. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Materials in Civil Constructions)
Open AccessCommunication Using Converter Dust to Produce Low Cost Cementitious Composites by in situ Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Synthesis
Materials 2011, 4(3), 575-584; doi:10.3390/ma4030575
Received: 13 January 2011 / Revised: 2 March 2011 / Accepted: 16 March 2011 / Published: 18 March 2011
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (732 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs) were synthesized on clinker and silica fume particles in order to create a low cost cementitious nanostructured material. The synthesis was carried out by an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using converter dust, an industrial
[...] Read more.
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs) were synthesized on clinker and silica fume particles in order to create a low cost cementitious nanostructured material. The synthesis was carried out by an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using converter dust, an industrial byproduct, as iron precursor. The use of these materials reduces the cost, with the objective of application in large-scale nanostructured cement production. The resulting products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be polydisperse in size and to have defective microstructure. Some enhancement in the mechanical behavior of cement mortars was observed due to the addition of these nano-size materials. The contribution of these CNTs/CNFs to the mechanical strength of mortar specimens is similar to that of high quality CNTs incorporated in mortars by physical mixture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Materials in Civil Constructions)
Open AccessArticle Masonry Columns Confined by Steel Fiber Composite Wraps
Materials 2011, 4(1), 311-326; doi:10.3390/ma4010311
Received: 7 December 2010 / Revised: 12 January 2011 / Accepted: 19 January 2011 / Published: 21 January 2011
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1779 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The application of steel fiber reinforced polymer (SRP) as a means of increasing the capacity of masonry columns is investigated in this study. The behavior of 23 solid-brick specimens that are externally wrapped by SRP sheets in low volumetric ratios is presented. The
[...] Read more.
The application of steel fiber reinforced polymer (SRP) as a means of increasing the capacity of masonry columns is investigated in this study. The behavior of 23 solid-brick specimens that are externally wrapped by SRP sheets in low volumetric ratios is presented. The specimens are subjected to axial monotonic load until failure occurs. Two widely used types of masonry columns of differing square cross-sections were tested in compression (square and octagonal cross-sections). It is concluded that SRP-confined masonry behaves very much like fiber reinforced polymers (FRP)-confined masonry. Confinement increases both the load-carrying capacity and the deformability of masonry almost linearly with average confining stress. A comparative analysis between experimental and theoretical values computed in compliance with the Italian Council of Research (CNR) was also developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Materials in Civil Constructions)
Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Compatibility between Beetle-Killed Lodgepole Pine (Pinus Contorta var. Latifolia) Wood with Portland Cement
Materials 2010, 3(12), 5311-5319; doi:10.3390/ma3125311
Received: 30 November 2010 / Revised: 15 December 2010 / Accepted: 16 December 2010 / Published: 17 December 2010
PDF Full-text (217 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The compatibility of wood from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosa) killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) with Portland cement was investigated based on time-since-death as a quantitative estimator, and the presence of blue-stained sapwood, brown rot, or white rot as qualitative indicators.
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The compatibility of wood from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosa) killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) with Portland cement was investigated based on time-since-death as a quantitative estimator, and the presence of blue-stained sapwood, brown rot, or white rot as qualitative indicators. The exothermic behavior of cement hydration, maximum heat rate, time to reach this maximum, and total heat released within a 3.5–24 h interval were used for defining a new wood-cement compatibility index (CX). CX was developed and accounted for large discrepancies in assessing wood-cement compatibility compared to the previous methods. Using CX, no significant differences were found between fresh or beetle-killed wood with respect to the suitability for cement; except for the white rot samples which reached or exceeded the levels of incompatibility. An outstanding physicochemical behavior was also found for blue-stained sapwood and cement, producing significantly higher compatibility indices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Materials in Civil Constructions)

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