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Special Issue "Conjugated Polymers"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Andrew Grimsdale

School of Materials Science and Engineering Nanyang Technological University Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue Singapore 639798
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Phone: +65 67906728
Fax: +65 67909081

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Conjugated polymers are a versatile class of organic functional materials which have attracted much interest for their optical and electronic properties, and their wide range of potential applications in organic electronic devices such as transistors, LEDs, solar cells, photodetectors, lasers, or sensors. Already many types of prototype devices have been made and some are now commercially available. In this issue we aim to present a range of articles on conjugated polymers as materials, with topics ranging from their synthesis and characterization through to their use in devices.

Dr. Andrew Grimsdale
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • conjugated polymers
  • organic semiconductors
  • luminescence
  • charge transport
  • light-emitting devices
  • transistors
  • sensors
  • solar cells

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids
Materials 2014, 7(3), 2120-2140; doi:10.3390/ma7032120
Received: 2 January 2014 / Revised: 19 February 2014 / Accepted: 4 March 2014 / Published: 13 March 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1036 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP) and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP
[...] Read more.
This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP) and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Polymers)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Preparation and Chemical Properties of π-Conjugated Polymers Containing Indigo Unit in the Main Chain
Materials 2014, 7(3), 2030-2043; doi:10.3390/ma7032030
Received: 19 January 2014 / Revised: 21 February 2014 / Accepted: 26 February 2014 / Published: 11 March 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (684 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
π-Conjugated polymers based on indigo unit were prepared. Dehalogenative polycondensation of N-hexyl-6,6'-dibromoindigo with a zerovalent nickel complex gave a homopolymer, P(HexI), in 77% yield. Copolymer of N-hexyl-indigo and pyridine, P(HexI-Py), was also prepared in 50% yield. P(HexI) showed good
[...] Read more.
π-Conjugated polymers based on indigo unit were prepared. Dehalogenative polycondensation of N-hexyl-6,6'-dibromoindigo with a zerovalent nickel complex gave a homopolymer, P(HexI), in 77% yield. Copolymer of N-hexyl-indigo and pyridine, P(HexI-Py), was also prepared in 50% yield. P(HexI) showed good solubility in organic solvents, whereas P(HexI-Py) was only soluble in acids such as HCOOH. The weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of P(HexI) and P(HexI-Py) were determined to be 10,000 and 40,000, respectively, by a light scattering method. Pd-catalyzed polycondensation between 6,6'-dibromoindigo with N-BOC (BOC = t-butoxycarbonyl) substituents and a diboronic compound of 9,9-dioctylfluorene afforded the corresponding alternating copolymer, P(BOCI-Flu), as a deep red solid in 98% yield. P(BOCI-Flu) was soluble in N-methyl-2-pyrroridone and showed an Mw of 29,000 in GPC analysis. Treatment of P(BOCI-Flu) with CF3COOH smoothly led to a BOC-deprotection reaction to give an insoluble deep green polymer, P(I-Flu), in a quantitative yield. Diffuse reflectance spectra of powdery P(BOCI-Flu) and P(I-Flu) showed peaks at about 580 nm and 630 nm, respectively, which are thought to originate from the indigo unit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Polymers)

Review

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Open AccessReview Electrospun Polymer Fibers for Electronic Applications
Materials 2014, 7(2), 906-947; doi:10.3390/ma7020906
Received: 24 December 2013 / Revised: 21 January 2014 / Accepted: 23 January 2014 / Published: 28 January 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1680 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nano- and micro- fibers of conjugated polymer semiconductors are particularly interesting both for applications and for fundamental research. They allow an investigation into how electronic properties are influenced by size confinement and chain orientation within microstructures that are not readily accessible within thin
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Nano- and micro- fibers of conjugated polymer semiconductors are particularly interesting both for applications and for fundamental research. They allow an investigation into how electronic properties are influenced by size confinement and chain orientation within microstructures that are not readily accessible within thin films. Moreover, they open the way to many applications in organic electronics, optoelectronics and sensing. Electro-spinning, the technique subject of this review, is a simple method to effectively form and control conjugated polymer fibers. We provide the basics of the technique and its recent advancements for the formation of highly conducting and high mobility polymer fibers towards their adoption in electronic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Polymers)

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