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Special Issue "Construction Materials"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Christian Paglia (Website)

Institute of Materials and Constructions, Department of Environment, Construction and Design, University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, Trevano, CP 12, CH-6952 Canobbio, Switzerland
Fax: +41 (0)58 666 63 59
Interests: aluminium alloys corrosion; materials corrosion; cementitious materials and materials durability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A main issue concerning the construction materials and systems is known to be the durability. Materials, such as metals, synthetic materials, cementitious materials and/or material combination and systems are known to deteriorate. In this concern, it is important to investigate with non-destructive and destructive diagnostic methods the degradation processes. Furthermore protection methods, preventive measures, maintenance and type of restoration have to be developed depending on the type of infrastructure. The gain of knowledge in these latter processes will help to clarify the most significant parameters responsible for the degradation of a construction system or material. This will also enable the optimization of material and system parameters in order to build more durable structures.

Dr. Christian Paglia
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • degradation
  • diagnostic
  • durability
  • protection
  • restoration

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Influence of Chloride-Ion Adsorption Agent on Chloride Ions in Concrete and Mortar
Materials 2014, 7(5), 3415-3426; doi:10.3390/ma7053415
Received: 24 February 2014 / Revised: 17 March 2014 / Accepted: 21 April 2014 / Published: 30 April 2014
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Abstract
The influence of a chloride-ion adsorption agent (Cl agent in short), composed of zeolite, calcium aluminate hydrate and calcium nitrite, on the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and mortar has been experimentally studied. The permeability of concrete was measured, and the [...] Read more.
The influence of a chloride-ion adsorption agent (Cl agent in short), composed of zeolite, calcium aluminate hydrate and calcium nitrite, on the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and mortar has been experimentally studied. The permeability of concrete was measured, and the chloride ion content in mortar was tested. The experimental results reveal that the Cl agent could adsorb chloride ions effectively, which had penetrated into concrete and mortar. When the Cl agent was used at a dosage of 6% by mass of cementitious materials in mortar, the resistance to the penetration of chloride ions could be improved greatly, which was more pronounced when a combination of the Cl agent and fly ash or slag was employed. Such an effect is not the result of the low permeability of the mortar, but might be a result of the interaction between the Cl agent and the chloride ions penetrated into the mortar. There are two possible mechanisms for the interaction between the Cl agent and chloride ion ingress. One is the reaction between calcium aluminate hydrate in the Cl agent and chloride ions to form Friedel’s salt, and the other one is that calcium aluminate hydrate reacts with calcium nitrite to form AFm during the early-age hydration of mortar and later the NO2 in AFm is replaced by chloride ions, which then penetrate into the mortar, also forming Friedel’s salt. More research is needed to confirm the mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Construction Materials)
Open AccessArticle Physical Characterization of Cementitious Materials on Casting and Placing Process
Materials 2014, 7(4), 3049-3064; doi:10.3390/ma7043049
Received: 25 February 2014 / Revised: 7 April 2014 / Accepted: 10 April 2014 / Published: 15 April 2014
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Abstract
Coagulation of cement particles is an inevitable phenomenon of fresh cement-based materials undergoing solidification. Coagulation can be classified into two types, reversible flocculation and irreversible coagulation, wherein microstructural change affects the rheological properties, including shear thinning and thixotropy, and the hydration process. [...] Read more.
Coagulation of cement particles is an inevitable phenomenon of fresh cement-based materials undergoing solidification. Coagulation can be classified into two types, reversible flocculation and irreversible coagulation, wherein microstructural change affects the rheological properties, including shear thinning and thixotropy, and the hydration process. This paper attempts to measure the mechanical property and the coagulation of cement particles according to the mix proportions of cement paste. Experimental setups were proposed for two different types of coagulations using a laser backscattering instrument. Volume fraction and size distribution of coagulated particles were obtained, and their variations were discussed. From the obtained results the microstructural buildup of freshly mixed cement pastes can be divided into three categories: permanent coagulation and strong and weak flocculation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Construction Materials)
Open AccessArticle Study on the Carbonation Behavior of Cement Mortar by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy
Materials 2014, 7(1), 218-231; doi:10.3390/ma7010218
Received: 28 November 2013 / Revised: 17 December 2013 / Accepted: 23 December 2013 / Published: 3 January 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (636 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new electrochemical model has been carefully established to explain the carbonation behavior of cement mortar, and the model has been validated by the experimental results. In fact, it is shown by this study that the electrochemical impedance behavior of mortars varies [...] Read more.
A new electrochemical model has been carefully established to explain the carbonation behavior of cement mortar, and the model has been validated by the experimental results. In fact, it is shown by this study that the electrochemical impedance behavior of mortars varies in the process of carbonation. With the cement/sand ratio reduced, the carbonation rate reveals more remarkable. The carbonation process can be quantitatively accessed by a parameter, which can be obtained by means of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based electrochemical model. It has been found that the parameter is a function of carbonation depth and of carbonation time. Thereby, prediction of carbonation depth can be achieved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Construction Materials)
Open AccessArticle Uniaxial Tension Test of Slender Reinforced Early Age Concrete Members
Materials 2011, 4(8), 1345-1359; doi:10.3390/ma4081345
Received: 21 June 2011 / Revised: 21 July 2011 / Accepted: 27 July 2011 / Published: 2 August 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (330 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study aims to obtain the tensile properties of early age concrete based on a uniaxial tension test employing RC slender members. First, the paper shows that concrete strain is equal to the strain of rebar at the mid-span of the [...] Read more.
The present study aims to obtain the tensile properties of early age concrete based on a uniaxial tension test employing RC slender members. First, the paper shows that concrete strain is equal to the strain of rebar at the mid-span of the RC member. The tensile Young’s modulus and the strain capacity of early age concrete are estimated using strain measurements. The experiment indicated that the tensile Young’s modulus at an early age is higher than the compressive modulus. This observation was similar to one found in a previous investigation which used a direct tension test of early age concrete. Moreover, the paper describes how an empirical equation for mature concrete can be applied to the relation between uniaxial tensile strength and splitting tensile strength even in early age concrete. Based on a uniaxial tension test, the paper proposes an empirical equation for the relationship between standard bond stresses and relative slip. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Construction Materials)

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