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Special Issue "Advances in Cosmetics"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Amparo Salvador-Carreño (Website)

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia Doctor Moliner St. 50, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
Fax: + 34 963544436
Interests: analytical chemistry; chromatography; spectroscopy; cosmetic products
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alberto Chisvert Sanía (Website)

Facultad de Química, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain
Interests: analytical chemistry; liquid and gas chromatography; mass spectrometry; solid-phase and liquid-phase microextraction; cosmetic analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research in the design and development of new cosmetic formulations is one of the scientific fields that increases more rapidly due to various causes. Firstly, the cosmetic companies are interested in continuous improvement of their products to achieve the highest possible efficiency without excessively increasing the cost, while respecting the current legislation regarding prohibited and restricted ingredients. Moreover, the cosmetic industry is closely linked to the world of fashion and then a good marketing of the products requires continuous evolution to provide to the users novel and timeliness products. In this special issue will be collected scientific contributions on the newest developments in materials and technology related to the raw materials used as cosmetic ingredients and also the manufacturing of cosmetic products today. Thus, this issue is devoted to general topics of interest such as nanotechnology in cosmetics, encapsulation, preservation of finished products, the advantages and difficulties in the use of natural ingredients, and also to discuss the new materials used as actives in some cosmetics such as hair products (including hair dyes), personal hygiene products, specific ingredients for skin care, sunscreens, decorative cosmetic, perfumes etc.. All this, with the aim of providing readers an update on recent developments in the cosmetic field.

Prof. Amparo Salvador
Dr. Alberto Chisvert
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • raw materials
  • technology and nanotechnology
  • encapsulation
  • preservatives
  • natural raw materials
  • hair products
  • personal hygiene and skin care
  • sunscreens
  • perfumes
  • decorative cosmetic

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Green Synthesis, Molecular Characterization and Associative Behavior of Some Gemini Surfactants without a Spacer Group
Materials 2013, 6(4), 1506-1519; doi:10.3390/ma6041506
Received: 1 February 2013 / Revised: 16 March 2013 / Accepted: 1 April 2013 / Published: 12 April 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (377 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A series of new gemini surfactants without a spacer group, disodium 2,3-dialkyl-1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylates, were synthesized in a green chemistry context minimizing the use of organic solvents and applying microwaves (MW) when activation energy was required. Once the desired architecture was confirmed by means [...] Read more.
A series of new gemini surfactants without a spacer group, disodium 2,3-dialkyl-1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylates, were synthesized in a green chemistry context minimizing the use of organic solvents and applying microwaves (MW) when activation energy was required. Once the desired architecture was confirmed by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance technique (1H-NMR, 1H-1H COSY) for all the studied surfactants, the critical micellization concentration was determined by conductance measurements. The diffusion coefficient of micelles formed by the four compounds was characterized using pulsed field gradient (PFG)-NMR. Diffusion coefficients were found to be dependent on the concentration and on the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain. The absence of the spacer group, peculiar to this new series of gemini surfactants, may confer relatively low flexibility to the molecules, with potential implications on the interfacial properties, namely on micellization. These gemini surfactants might have interesting applications in the preparation of composite materials, in nanotechnology, in gene transfection and mainly, due to the low CMCs, as new interesting ingredients of cosmetics and toiletries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cosmetics)
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Open AccessArticle Chitosonic® Acid as a Novel Cosmetic Ingredient: Evaluation of its Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Hydration Activities
Materials 2013, 6(4), 1391-1402; doi:10.3390/ma6041391
Received: 30 November 2012 / Revised: 22 February 2013 / Accepted: 20 March 2013 / Published: 28 March 2013
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (297 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chitosonic® Acid, carboxymethyl hexanoyl chitosan, is a novel chitosan material that has recently been accepted by the Personal Care Products Council as a new cosmetic ingredient with the INCI (International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients) name Carboxymethyl Caprooyl Chitosan. In this study, [...] Read more.
Chitosonic® Acid, carboxymethyl hexanoyl chitosan, is a novel chitosan material that has recently been accepted by the Personal Care Products Council as a new cosmetic ingredient with the INCI (International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients) name Carboxymethyl Caprooyl Chitosan. In this study, we analyze several important cosmetic characteristics of Chitosonic® Acid. Our results demonstrate that Chitosonic® Acid is a water-soluble chitosan derivative with a high HLB value. Chitosonic® Acid can form a nano-network structure when its concentration is higher than 0.5% and can self-assemble into a nanosphere structure when its concentration is lower than 0.2%. Chitosonic® Acid has potent antimicrobial activities against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria and fungus. Chitosonic® Acid also has moderate DPPH radical scavenging activity. Additionally, Chitosonic® Acid exhibits good hydration activity for absorbing and retaining water molecules with its hydrophilic groups. From a safety point of view, Chitosonic® Acid has no cytotoxicity to L-929 cells if its concentration is less than 0.5%. Moreover, Chitosonic® Acid has good compatibilities with various normal cosmetic ingredients. Therefore, we propose that Chitosonic® Acid has the potential to be a widely used ingredient in various types of cosmetic products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cosmetics)
Open AccessArticle Cosmetic Analysis Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI)
Materials 2013, 6(3), 1000-1010; doi:10.3390/ma6031000
Received: 5 December 2012 / Revised: 29 January 2013 / Accepted: 25 February 2013 / Published: 13 March 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (632 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new “omic” platform—Cosmetomics—that proves to be extremely simple and effective in terms of sample preparation and readiness for data acquisition/interpretation is presented. This novel approach employing Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) for cosmetic analysis has proven to readily identify [...] Read more.
A new “omic” platform—Cosmetomics—that proves to be extremely simple and effective in terms of sample preparation and readiness for data acquisition/interpretation is presented. This novel approach employing Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) for cosmetic analysis has proven to readily identify and quantify compounds of interest. It also allows full control of all the production phases, as well as of the final product, by integration of both analytical and statistical data. This work has focused on products of daily use, namely nail polish, lipsticks and eyeliners of multiple brands sold in the worldwide market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cosmetics)

Review

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Open AccessReview Natural Melanogenesis Inhibitors Acting Through the Down-Regulation of Tyrosinase Activity
Materials 2012, 5(9), 1661-1685; doi:10.3390/ma5091661
Received: 8 August 2012 / Revised: 30 August 2012 / Accepted: 5 September 2012 / Published: 17 September 2012
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (932 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Melanogenesis is a biosynthetic pathway for the formation of the pigment melanin in human skin. A key enzyme, tyrosinase, catalyzes the first and only rate-limiting steps in melanogenesis, and the down-regulation of enzyme activity is the most reported method for the inhibition [...] Read more.
Melanogenesis is a biosynthetic pathway for the formation of the pigment melanin in human skin. A key enzyme, tyrosinase, catalyzes the first and only rate-limiting steps in melanogenesis, and the down-regulation of enzyme activity is the most reported method for the inhibition of melanogenesis. Because of the cosmetically important issue of hyperpigmentation, there is a big demand for melanogenesis inhibitors. This encourages researchers to seek potent melanogenesis inhibitors for cosmetic uses. This article reviews melanogenesis inhibitors that have been recently discovered from natural sources. The reaction mechanisms of the inhibitors on tyrosinase activity are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cosmetics)

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