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Special Issue "Supported Lipid Membrane Surface Modifications and Applications"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Erik Reimhult

Head, Department of Nanobiotechnology, Instititute for Biologocially inspired materials, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Muthgasse 11-II, A-1190 Vienna, Austria
Website1 | Website2 | E-Mail
Interests: colloidal science; surface science; liquid interfaces; nanoscience; nanoparticles; lipid membranes; polymer brushes; biointerfaces; biosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Lipid membranes are versatile and convenient alternatives to study the properties of natural cell membranes. Self-assembled, artificial, substrate-supported lipid membranes have taken a central role in membrane research due to a combination of factors such as ease of creation, control over complexity, stability and the applicability of a large range of different analytical techniques. While supported lipid bilayers have been investigated for several decades, recent advances in the understanding of the assembly of such membranes from liposomes have spawned a renaissance in the field. Supported lipid bilayers are a highly promising tool to study transmembrane proteins in their native state, an application that could have tremendous impact on, e.g. drug discovery, development of biointerfaces and as platforms for glycomics and probing of multivalent binding which requires ligand mobility. Parallel advances in microfluidics, biosensor design, micro- and nanofabrication have converged to bring self-assembled supported lipid bilayers closer to a versatile and easy to use research tool as well as closer to industrial applications. The field of supported lipid bilayer research and application is thus rapidly expanding and diversifying with new platforms continuously being proposed and developed. With this issue we aim to collect state-of-the-art contributions from the wide range of research of importance to the further development of surface-tethered lipid systems and their application to scientific and technological challenges.

Dr. Erik Reimhult
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • supported lipid bilayer
  • biosensor
  • artificial membrane mimic
  • surface sensitive
  • patterning
  • membrane protein
  • surface modification
  • liposome
  • fusion
  • lipid vesicle
  • tethered membrane
  • array
  • cell membrane
  • self assembly

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Neural Stem Cell Spreading on Lipid Based Artificial Cell Surfaces, Characterized by Combined X-ray and Neutron Reflectometry
Materials 2010, 3(11), 4994-5006; doi:10.3390/ma3114994
Received: 25 October 2010 / Accepted: 9 November 2010 / Published: 22 November 2010
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (552 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We developed a bioadhesive coating based on a synthetic peptide-conjugate (AK-cyclo[RGDfC]) which contains multiples of the arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) amino acid sequence. Biotinylated AK-cyclo[RGDfC] is bound to a supported lipid bilayer via a streptavidin interlayer. Layering, hydration and packing of the coating is
[...] Read more.
We developed a bioadhesive coating based on a synthetic peptide-conjugate (AK-cyclo[RGDfC]) which contains multiples of the arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) amino acid sequence. Biotinylated AK-cyclo[RGDfC] is bound to a supported lipid bilayer via a streptavidin interlayer. Layering, hydration and packing of the coating is quantified by X-ray and neutron reflectometry experiments. AK-cyclo[RGDfC] binds to the streptavidin interlayer in a stretched-out on edge configuration. The highly packed configuration with only 12% water content maximizes the number of accessible adhesion sites. Enhanced cell spreading of neural stem cells was observed for AK-cyclo[RGDfC] functionalized bilayers. Due to the large variety of surfaces which can be coated by physisorption of lipid bilayers, this approach is of general interest for the fabrication of biocompatible surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supported Lipid Membrane Surface Modifications and Applications)
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