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Special Issue "Reactive Intermediates"

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A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Margarita Parra-Alvarez

Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, 46100 Burjassot, Spain
Interests: reactivity; regioselectivity; enantioselectivity; enediolates and dienediolates of carboxylic acids; chemosensors; chemical warfare; explosives; optical detection; fluorescence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The knowledge of reactive intermediate chemistry is central to develop modern mechanism and quantitative understanding of Organic Chemistry. This special issue tries to be a summary of the latest advances in this topic, both from the reactivity of the characterization point of view. We pretend to include research results in the chemistry of many types of reactive molecules as intermediates, starting from carbocations, carbanions or free radicals and continuing through carbenes, nitrenes or arynes. On the other hand, advanced experimental techniques of modern physical-organic chemistry, isolation methods and characterization of highly reactive molecules will be welcome. We invite the scientific community to take part of this project.

Dr. Margarita Parra-Alvarez
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • carbocations
  • carbanions
  • free radicals
  • carbenes
  • nitrenes
  • arynes
  • spectroscopy methods

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview The Expanding Role of Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Probing Reactive Intermediates in Solution
Molecules 2012, 17(10), 11507-11537; doi:10.3390/molecules171011507
Received: 25 July 2012 / Revised: 29 August 2012 / Accepted: 5 September 2012 / Published: 27 September 2012
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (518 KB)
Abstract
Within the past decade, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has rapidly occupied a prominent position for liquid-phase mechanistic studies due to its intrinsic advantages allowing for efficient “fishing” (rapid, sensitive, specific and simultaneous detection/identification) of multiple intermediates and products directly from a [...] Read more.
Within the past decade, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has rapidly occupied a prominent position for liquid-phase mechanistic studies due to its intrinsic advantages allowing for efficient “fishing” (rapid, sensitive, specific and simultaneous detection/identification) of multiple intermediates and products directly from a “real-world” solution. In this review we attempt to offer a comprehensive overview of the ESI-MS-based methodologies and strategies developed up to date to study reactive species in reaction solutions. A full description of general issues involved with probing reacting species from complex (bio)chemical reaction systems is briefly covered, including the potential sources of reactive intermediate (metabolite) generation, analytical aspects and challenges, basic rudiments of ESI-MS and the state-of-the-art technology. The main purpose of the present review is to highlight the utility of ESI-MS and its expanding role in probing reactive intermediates from various reactions in solution, with special focus on current progress in ESI-MS-based approaches for improving throughput, testing reality and real-time detection by using newly developed MS instruments and emerging ionization sources (such as ambient ESI techniques). In addition, the limitations of modern ESI-MS in detecting intermediates in organic reactions is also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reactive Intermediates)

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