Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Guozhen Liu

ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale Biophotonics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-2-9850-9547
Interests: biosensors; immunosensors; nanosensors; electrochemistry; analytical chemistry; interface chemistry; nanotechnology; medical devices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A sensor device is defined by its receptor (chemical or biological) unit, with unique specificities toward corresponding analytes. Nanomaterials have demonstrated tremendous potential in being integrated with sensing devices due to their extremely small sizes, high specific surfaces, and versatile surface chemistry, allowing intimate interactions with an enhanced amount of capture molecules for analytes. Nanomaterial-based sensors have clearly enhanced sensing performances in terms of sensitivity and detection limits, down to the detection of single molecules. The specific properties of such nano objects also offer alternatives to classic transduction methods by modification of a spectrum of receptors. Furthermore, the combination of different nanomaterials in the same sensing interface, each with its own characteristics, to further enhance the performances of chemical sensors or biosensors, is a well-accepted strategy. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials, “Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications”, aims at collecting a compilation of articles that prominently demonstrate the continuous efforts in developing advanced nanomaterial-based sensing technologies for various target analytes. It focuses on the synthesis, properties, and prospective sensing applications of nanomaterials. The topics cover a wide range of research fields, including nanomaterials, biotechnology, nanofabrication, and sensors, in the forms of reviews, communications, and academic articles.

Prof. Dr. Guozhen Liu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • nanomaterials,
  • chemical sensors,
  • biosensors,
  • nanosensors,
  • gold nanoparticles,
  • quantum dots,
  • magnetic nanoparticles,
  • nanostructured carbon,
  • surface modification

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle H2S Sensing by Hybrids Based on Nanocrystalline SnO2 Functionalized with Cu(II) Organometallic Complexes: The Role of the Ligand Platform
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(11), 384; doi:10.3390/nano7110384
Received: 1 October 2017 / Revised: 24 October 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
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Abstract
This paper deals with the functionalization of nanocrystalline SnO2 with Cu(II) complexes with organic ligands, aimed at the improvement of sensor selectivity towards gas molecules. For the synthesis of metalorganic/SnO2 hybrid material complexes of Cu(II) with phthalocyanine, porphyrinines, bipyridine and azadithiacrown
[...] Read more.
This paper deals with the functionalization of nanocrystalline SnO2 with Cu(II) complexes with organic ligands, aimed at the improvement of sensor selectivity towards gas molecules. For the synthesis of metalorganic/SnO2 hybrid material complexes of Cu(II) with phthalocyanine, porphyrinines, bipyridine and azadithiacrown etherwere used. The analysis of gas sensor properties showed the possibility of increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of hybrid materials in H2S detection due to the electron transfer from SnO2 to an adsorbed organic molecule, which changes during the interaction between H2S and Cu(II) ions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Regulation of the Electroanalytical Performance of Ultrathin Titanium Dioxide Nanosheets toward Lead Ions by Non-Metal Doping
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 327; doi:10.3390/nano7100327
Received: 13 September 2017 / Revised: 10 October 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 14 October 2017
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Abstract
Three non-metallic elements, sulfur, fluorine, and iodine, were used to dope the ultrathin two-dimensional TiO2 nanosheets, which would regulate their electroanalytical properties toward heavy metal ions. Among these doped materials, fluorine-doped TiO2 nanosheets shows the highest electrochemical sensitivity and a superior
[...] Read more.
Three non-metallic elements, sulfur, fluorine, and iodine, were used to dope the ultrathin two-dimensional TiO2 nanosheets, which would regulate their electroanalytical properties toward heavy metal ions. Among these doped materials, fluorine-doped TiO2 nanosheets shows the highest electrochemical sensitivity and a superior detection limit toward Pb(II) when the doping concentration is 10%. When compared with the bare TiO2 nanosheets, the sensitivity increased by 102%, and the detection limit decreased by 36.4%. Through combining further electrochemical experiments and density-functional theory calculations, the enhanced electrochemical performance stemming from element doping was then investigated in detail. The theoretical calculation demonstrated that fluorine doping could greatly increase the adsorption energy of Pb(II) on the TiO2 nanosheets and enhance their loading capacity. Both cyclic voltammetric and electrical impedance spectroscopy analysis indicated the enhanced electron transfer rate on the electrode modified by fluorine-doped TiO2 nanosheets. Further measurement on the desorption performance showed the better stripping response of Pb(II) on the electrode with TiO2 nanosheets after fluorine doping, which suggests that fluorine doping is beneficial for Pb(II) diffuse onto the electrode surface for the reduction and stripping reaction. Therefore, the element doping of two-dimensional TiO2 nanosheets provides a facile method to extend the electronic materials toward detection of heavy metal ions in the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Three-Dimensional Porous Nitrogen-Doped NiO Nanostructures as Highly Sensitive NO2 Sensors
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 313; doi:10.3390/nano7100313
Received: 11 September 2017 / Revised: 2 October 2017 / Accepted: 8 October 2017 / Published: 11 October 2017
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Abstract
Nickel oxide has been widely used in chemical sensing applications, because it has an excellent p-type semiconducting property with high chemical stability. Here, we present a novel technique of fabricating three-dimensional porous nitrogen-doped nickel oxide nanosheets as a highly sensitive NO2 sensor.
[...] Read more.
Nickel oxide has been widely used in chemical sensing applications, because it has an excellent p-type semiconducting property with high chemical stability. Here, we present a novel technique of fabricating three-dimensional porous nitrogen-doped nickel oxide nanosheets as a highly sensitive NO2 sensor. The elaborate nanostructure was prepared by a simple and effective hydrothermal synthesis method. Subsequently, nitrogen doping was achieved by thermal treatment with ammonia gas. When the p-type dopant, i.e., nitrogen atoms, was introduced in the three-dimensional nanostructures, the nickel-oxide-nanosheet-based sensor showed considerable NO2 sensing ability with two-fold higher responsivity and sensitivity compared to non-doped nickel-oxide-based sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Reduced Graphene Oxides: Influence of the Reduction Method on the Electrocatalytic Effect towards Nucleic Acid Oxidation
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(7), 168; doi:10.3390/nano7070168
Received: 21 April 2017 / Revised: 27 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 4 July 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3823 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
For the first time a critical analysis of the influence that four different graphene oxide reduction methods have on the electrochemical properties of the resulting reduced graphene oxides (RGOs) is reported. Starting from the same graphene oxide, chemical (CRGO), hydrothermal (hTRGO), electrochemical (ERGO),
[...] Read more.
For the first time a critical analysis of the influence that four different graphene oxide reduction methods have on the electrochemical properties of the resulting reduced graphene oxides (RGOs) is reported. Starting from the same graphene oxide, chemical (CRGO), hydrothermal (hTRGO), electrochemical (ERGO), and thermal (TRGO) reduced graphene oxide were produced. The materials were fully characterized and the topography and electroactivity of the resulting glassy carbon modified electrodes were also evaluated. An oligonucleotide molecule was used as a model of DNA electrochemical biosensing. The results allow for the conclusion that TRGO produced the RGOs with the best electrochemical performance for oligonucleotide electroanalysis. A clear shift in the guanine oxidation peak potential to lower values (~0.100 V) and an almost two-fold increase in the current intensity were observed compared with the other RGOs. The electrocatalytic effect has a multifactorial explanation because the TRGO was the material that presented a higher polydispersity and lower sheet size, thus exposing a larger quantity of defects to the electrode surface, which produces larger physical and electrochemical areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications)
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Open AccessArticle A Large-Area Nanoplasmonic Sensor Fabricated by Rapid Thermal Annealing Treatment for Label-Free and Multi-Point Immunoglobulin Sensing
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(5), 100; doi:10.3390/nano7050100
Received: 17 February 2017 / Revised: 25 April 2017 / Accepted: 28 April 2017 / Published: 2 May 2017
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Abstract
Immunoglobulins are important biomarkers to evaluate the immune status or development of infectious diseases. To provide timely clinical treatments, it is important to continuously monitor the level of multiple immunoglobulins. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based nanoplasmonic sensors have been demonstrated for multiplex immunoglobulins
[...] Read more.
Immunoglobulins are important biomarkers to evaluate the immune status or development of infectious diseases. To provide timely clinical treatments, it is important to continuously monitor the level of multiple immunoglobulins. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based nanoplasmonic sensors have been demonstrated for multiplex immunoglobulins detection. However, the sensor fabrication process is usually slow and complicated, so it is not accessible for large-area and batch fabrication. Herein, we report a large-area (2 cm × 2 cm) nanofabrication method using physical vapor deposition followed by a rapid thermal annealing treatment. To optimize the sensor performance, we systematically characterized three fabrication conditions, including (1) the deposition thickness; (2) the maximum annealing temperature, and (3) the annealing time. The corresponding absorbance spectrum profile and surface morphology of the nanostructures were observed by a UV-VIS spectrometer and atomic force microscopy. We then tested the sensitivity of the sensor using a glucose solution at different concentrations. The results showed that the sensor with 10 nm gold deposition thickness under 5-min 900 °C rapid thermal annealing can achieve the highest sensitivity (189 nm RIU−1). Finally, we integrated this nanoplasmonic sensor with a microchannel and a motorized stage to perform a 10-spot immunoglobulin detection in 50 min. Based on its real-time, dynamic and multi-point analyte detection capability, the nanoplasmonic sensor has the potential to be applied in high-throughput or multiplex immunoassay analysis, which would be beneficial for disease diagnosis or biomedical research in a simple and cost-effective platform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Calcination Method Synthesis of SnO2/g-C3N4 Composites for a High-Performance Ethanol Gas Sensing Application
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(5), 98; doi:10.3390/nano7050098
Received: 7 February 2017 / Revised: 12 April 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 29 April 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5001 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The SnO2/g-C3N4 composites were synthesized via a facile calcination method by using SnCl4·5H2O and urea as the precursor. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized composites were characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction
[...] Read more.
The SnO2/g-C3N4 composites were synthesized via a facile calcination method by using SnCl4·5H2O and urea as the precursor. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized composites were characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), the field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (FESEM and TEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), thermal gravity and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), and N2-sorption. The analysis results indicated that the as-synthesized samples possess the two dimensional structure. Additionally, the SnO2 nanoparticles were highly dispersed on the surface of the g-C3N4 nanosheets. The gas-sensing performance of the as-synthesized composites for different gases was tested. Moreover, the composite with 7 wt % g-C3N4 content (SnO2/g-C3N4-7) exhibits an admirable gas-sensing property to ethanol, which possesses a higher response and better selectivity than that of the pure SnO2-based sensor. The high surface area of the SnO2/g-C3N4 composite and the good electronic characteristics of the two dimensional graphitic carbon nitride are in favor of the elevated gas-sensing property. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles for Diagnostic Sensing
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(12), 411; doi:10.3390/nano7120411
Received: 9 October 2017 / Revised: 15 November 2017 / Accepted: 20 November 2017 / Published: 23 November 2017
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Abstract
Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties, such as a long luminescence lifetime (up to several milliseconds), sharp emission peaks, and upconversion luminescence over the range of wavelengths from near-infrared to visible. Exploiting these optical properties, lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have been widely utilized for cellular
[...] Read more.
Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties, such as a long luminescence lifetime (up to several milliseconds), sharp emission peaks, and upconversion luminescence over the range of wavelengths from near-infrared to visible. Exploiting these optical properties, lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have been widely utilized for cellular and small animal imaging with the absence of background autofluorescence. In addition, these nanoparticles have advantages of high signal-to-noise ratio for highly sensitive and selective diagnostic detection. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent progress in the development of highly sensitive diagnostic methods using lanthanide-doped nanoparticles. Combined with a smartphone, portable luminescence detecting platforms could be widely applied in point-of-care tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensing Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles for diagnostic application
Corresponding Author: Song Yeul Lee, Yong Il Park
Abstract:  School of Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, South KoreaAbstract: Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties such as long luminescence lifetime (up to several milliseconds), and upconversion luminescence (NIR to visible). Exploiting these optical properties, lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have been widely utilized for cellular and small animal imaging with the absence of background autofluorescence. And, these nanoparticles also have advantages for highly sensitive diagnostic detection. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress in the development of highly sensitive diagnostic methods using lanthanide-doped nanoparticles.
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