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Special Issue "Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Amanda Devine

Edith Cowan Univerity, School of Medical and Health Sciences,Perth Western Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Food security; Gut health; Life course Nutrition; Food literacy & Nutrition education; Built food environment
Guest Editor
Dr. Tanya Lawlis

University of Canberra, School of Clinical Sciences, Canberra Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Food security; Food literacy & Nutrition education; Child and Teenage health; Interprofessional education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food insecurity is a complex ‘wicked’ problem that results from a range of unstable and uncertain physical, social, cultural and economic factors that limits access to nutritious food. Globally, 800 million people are under-nourished, and around 2 billion are overweight/obese or have micronutrient deficiency. These populations are largely positioned in developing countries where disease burden is high and impacts health budgets and productivity. Similarly developed countries, cities and neighbourhoods are experiencing a greater emergence of vulnerable populations. This is in part explained by the change in the food production and manufacturing, the retraction in economic climates, the increase in food price, and in some regions reduced food availability and access.

Vulnerable groups include but are not limited to migrant populations, Indigenous people, elderly, pregnant women, those with disability, homeless, young children and youth. Poor nutrition at significant periods of growth and development and during life impact long term health outcomes increasing non-communicable disease prevalence, health cost and reducing economic productivity.

This issue, Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups draws together quantitative and qualitative publications that have attempted to address the challenges of nutrition for vulnerable groups and have considered the complexity of the problem, the need for locally-driven solutions and scalable solutions and policy implications. Original papers, review articles and intervention studies dealing with vulnerable groups and dietary considerations will be included.

Dr. Amanda Devine
Dr. Tanya Lawlis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Vulnerable groups 
  • Nutrition 
  • Food 
  • Emergency food relief
  • Food rescue 
  • Food assistance program 
  • Food insufficiency 
  • Malnutrition 
  • Obesity 
  • Micronutrient deficiency 
  • Food programs/food bank/food interventions 
  • Health impacts 
  • Economic impacts

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Daily Dietary Intake Patterns Improve after Visiting a Food Pantry among Food-Insecure Rural Midwestern Adults
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 583; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050583
Received: 19 April 2018 / Revised: 3 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 May 2018 / Published: 9 May 2018
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Abstract
Emergency food pantries provide food at no cost to low-resource populations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate single-day dietary intake patterns before and after visiting a food pantry among food-secure and food-insecure pantry clients. This observational cohort study comprised a paired,
[...] Read more.
Emergency food pantries provide food at no cost to low-resource populations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate single-day dietary intake patterns before and after visiting a food pantry among food-secure and food-insecure pantry clients. This observational cohort study comprised a paired, before-and-after design with a pantry visit as the intervention. Participants (n = 455) completed a demographic and food security assessment, and two 24-h dietary recalls. Adult food security was measured using the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module. Dietary intake patterns were assessed using Automated Self-Administered 24-h Recall data and classified by Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2010) scores, dietary variety, number of eating occasions, and energy intake. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared outcomes before and after a pantry visit. Mean dietary variety increased after the pantry visit among both food-secure (p = 0.02) and food-insecure (p < 0.0001) pantry clients. Mean energy intake (p = 0.0003), number of eating occasions (p = 0.004), and HEI-2010 component scores for total fruit (p < 0.001) and whole fruit (p < 0.0003) increased among food-insecure pantry clients only. A pantry visit may improve dietary intake patterns, especially among food-insecure pantry clients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups)
Open AccessArticle Household Food Insecurity as a Predictor of Stunted Children and Overweight/Obese Mothers (SCOWT) in Urban Indonesia
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 535; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050535
Received: 9 February 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
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Abstract
(1) Background: The double burden of malnutrition has been increasing in countries experiencing the nutrition transition. This study aimed to determine the relationship between household food insecurity and the double burden of malnutrition, defined as within-household stunted child and an overweight/obese mother
[...] Read more.
(1) Background: The double burden of malnutrition has been increasing in countries experiencing the nutrition transition. This study aimed to determine the relationship between household food insecurity and the double burden of malnutrition, defined as within-household stunted child and an overweight/obese mother (SCOWT). (2) Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the urban city of Surabaya, Indonesia in April and May 2015. (3) Results: The prevalence of child stunting in urban Surabaya was 36.4%, maternal overweight/obesity was 70.2%, and SCOWT was 24.7%. Although many households were food secure (42%), there were high proportions of mild (22.9%), moderate (15.3%) and severe (19.7%) food insecurity. In a multivariate logistic regression, the household food insecurity access scale (HFIAS) category significantly correlated with child stunting and SCOWT. Compared to food secure households, mildly food insecure households had the greatest odds of SCOWT (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.789; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.540–5.083), followed by moderately food insecure (aOR = 2.530; 95% CI = 1.286–4.980) and severely food insecure households (aOR = 2.045; 95% CI = 1.087–3.848). (4) Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that the double burden of malnutrition is related to food insecurity, and the HFIAS category is a predictor of SCOWT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups)
Open AccessArticle Is What Low-Income Brazilians Are Eating in Popular Restaurants Contributing to Promote Their Health?
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040414
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 28 February 2018 / Accepted: 5 March 2018 / Published: 27 March 2018
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Abstract
This study evaluates the healthfulness of the meals offered to and consumed by low-income Brazilians in Popular Restaurants (PR). It is a cross-sectional, exploratory study. The final sample includes 36 PRs, respecting the stratification criteria for each of the five Brazilian regions. To
[...] Read more.
This study evaluates the healthfulness of the meals offered to and consumed by low-income Brazilians in Popular Restaurants (PR). It is a cross-sectional, exploratory study. The final sample includes 36 PRs, respecting the stratification criteria for each of the five Brazilian regions. To identify the quantity and quality of food consumption, consumers’ meals are evaluated. The sample calculation uses a minimum of 41 consumers in each PR. Consumption evaluation is carried out by weighing and direct observation of the meal that each consumer served to his plate. Each dish of the meals had its Technical preparation files (TPF) developed by observing the production and weighing all the ingredients. Evaluations of Energy density (ED), meal’s weight components and sodium composition are conducted. Plate’s composition is compared to “My plate” guidelines United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The final sample includes 1771 low-income Brazilians consumers. The plate of PRs consumers is adequate only for the “protein group” in comparison to “My plate”. Rice and beans compose more than 50% of the plate’s weight, as expected, since it is a Brazilian habit of consumption at lunch. Thus, grains are the major group consumed by PRs consumers. The average ED for all PRs is 1.34 kcal/g. Regarding sodium content, rice and main courses presented the highest values and are classified as high, according to Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Concerning sodium, PRs are putting Brazilian low-income population at risk for chronic diseases. However, in general, PRs are good choices because they promote access to cheap and quality traditional Brazilian foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups)
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Open AccessArticle Influence of Feeding Practices on Malnutrition in Haitian Infants and Young Children
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 382; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030382
Received: 7 January 2018 / Revised: 23 February 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
PDF Full-text (11220 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Infant malnutrition remains an important cause of death and disability, and Haiti has the highest prevalence in the Americas. Therefore, preventive strategies are needed. Our aims were (1) To assess the prevalence of malnutrition among young children seen at a health center in
[...] Read more.
Infant malnutrition remains an important cause of death and disability, and Haiti has the highest prevalence in the Americas. Therefore, preventive strategies are needed. Our aims were (1) To assess the prevalence of malnutrition among young children seen at a health center in Haiti; (2) Examine adherence to infant feeding practices recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the association to nutritional status. This cross-sectional study recruited children from the Saint Espri Health Center in Port Au Prince in 2014. We recorded feeding practices, socio-demographic data, and anthropometric measurements (WHO-2006). We evaluated 278 infants and children younger than two years old, aged 8.08 ± 6.5 months, 53.2% female. 18.35% were underweight (weight/age <−2 SD); 13.31% stunted (length/age <−2 SD), and 13.67% had moderate or severe wasting (weight/length <−2 SD). Malnutrition was associated with male gender, older age, lower maternal education level, and greater numbers of siblings (Chi2, p < 0.05). Adherence to recommended breastfeeding practices was 11.8–97.9%, and to complementary feeding practices was 9.7–90.3%. Adherence was associated with a lower prevalence of malnutrition. Conclusion: Prevalence of infant and young child malnutrition in this population is high. Adherence to WHO-recommended feeding practices was associated with a better nutritional status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups)
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