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Special Issue "Advances in Dietary Supplements"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Taylor C. Wallace

1. Department of Nutrition and Food Studies, George Mason University, USA
2. Think Healthy Group, Inc., USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: anthocyanins; dietary bioactives; multivitamins; dietary supplements; choline; eggs; calcium; vitamin D; bone health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Advances in Dietary Supplements”, welcomes the submission of original research manuscripts and/or reviews of the current scientific literature. Consumers utilize and have faith in a variety of products; this is illustrated by the rapid expansion of the dietary supplement market over the last 20 years. Their mainstream use and availability creates an enormous need for balanced and credible scientific evidence highlighting their safety, efficacy and potential effects on human health.

Manuscripts should focus on the benefits and harms of dietary supplement use across the population or a specific subpopulation. Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Health effects of dietary supplements (both positive and negative), with an emphasis on human studies.
  • Human clinical trials, controlled feeding studies, or longitudinal analyses of dietary supplement use.
  • Motivations for and prevalence of dietary supplement use.
  • Mechanism(s) of action and/or synergistic interactions of compounds within dietary supplements.
  • The effect of dietary supplements on biomarkers of nutritional status, particularly those measured in human samples.
  • Development of analytical methods for identification and quantification of dietary bioactive components found in supplements.
Dr. Taylor C. Wallace
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dietary supplements
  • Nutrients
  • Dietary bioactive compounds
  • Safety
  • Efficacy
  • Health promotion
  • Disease prevention

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Improved Information and Educational Messages on Outer Packaging of Micronutrient Powders Distributed in Indonesia Increase Caregiver Knowledge and Adherence to Recommended Use
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 747; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060747
Received: 19 April 2018 / Revised: 5 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the influence of improved information and educational messages on outer packaging of a micronutrient powder (MNP), locally known as “Taburia”, on knowledge and adherence to recommended use. A community-based cluster randomized controlled trial
[...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to examine the influence of improved information and educational messages on outer packaging of a micronutrient powder (MNP), locally known as “Taburia”, on knowledge and adherence to recommended use. A community-based cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted among 1149 caregivers and their children aged 6–36 months. Caregiver–child dyads were randomized by their villages to receive 30 sachets of Taburia with the: (i) original outer packaging; (ii) improved outer packaging; or (iii) improved outer packaging combined with cooking demonstrations. Adherence to Taburia use was assessed through caregiver interviews and observation of unused sachets during home visits; “high” adherence was defined as consuming 13–17 sachets in the previous month. Data collection included surveys and focus groups discussions. The majority of caregivers (>80%) preferred the improved packaging because it was more attractive and contained more comprehensive information. Caregivers who received the improved packaging had better knowledge regarding the recommended use of Taburia (p < 0.001) and higher adherence with the prescribed use of Taburia (43% with “high” adherence) (p < 0.001) than those who received the original packaging (29% with “high” adherence). Caregivers who participated in cooking demonstrations generally had better knowledge regarding the benefits of Taburia and recommended use, but this did not lead to higher adherence to recommended use. “Underconsumption” of Taburia (≤7 sachets) was much less prevalent than “overconsumption” (≥23 sachets), and original packaging users were more likely to consume Taburia daily instead of every two days as recommended. We conclude that the design of the outer packaging and comprehensiveness of information provided are important influencers of recommended MNP use by caregivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dietary Supplements)
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Open AccessArticle Hepatoprotective Effects of Insect Extracts in an Animal Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 735; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060735
Received: 3 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 7 June 2018
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Abstract
Insects represent the largest and most diverse group of organisms on earth and are potential food and drug resources. Recently, we have demonstrated that a Forsythia viridissima extract prevented free fatty acid-induced lipid accumulation in an in vitro cellular nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
[...] Read more.
Insects represent the largest and most diverse group of organisms on earth and are potential food and drug resources. Recently, we have demonstrated that a Forsythia viridissima extract prevented free fatty acid-induced lipid accumulation in an in vitro cellular nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) model. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of extracts of the insects Protaetia brevitarsis seulensis Kolbe, 1886 (PB), Oxya chinensis sinuosa Mishchenko, 1951 (OC), and Gryllus bimaculatus De Geer, 1773 (GB) in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD animal model, as well as to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The effects of the supplementation with PB, OC, and GB extracts were evaluated histopathologically and histochemically. PB, OC, and GB extract supplementation inhibited the HFD-induced increase in body weight and body fat mass and ameliorated other adverse changes, resulting in decreased liver function parameters, lower serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and increased serum adiponectin levels. The expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid droplet accumulation and in fatty acid uptake also decreased upon treatment of HFD-fed mice with the extracts. These results provide evidence of the protective effects of the PB, OC, and GB extracts against HFD-induced fatty liver disease in an animal model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dietary Supplements)
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Open AccessArticle Leucine Supplementation Does Not Attenuate Skeletal Muscle Loss during Leg Immobilization in Healthy, Young Men
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050635
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 17 May 2018
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Abstract
Background: Short successive periods of physical inactivity occur throughout life and contribute considerably to the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass. The maintenance of muscle mass during brief periods of disuse is required to prevent functional decline and maintain metabolic health. Objective: To
[...] Read more.
Background: Short successive periods of physical inactivity occur throughout life and contribute considerably to the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass. The maintenance of muscle mass during brief periods of disuse is required to prevent functional decline and maintain metabolic health. Objective: To assess whether daily leucine supplementation during a short period of disuse can attenuate subsequent muscle loss in vivo in humans. Methods: Thirty healthy (22 ± 1 y) young males were exposed to a 7-day unilateral knee immobilization intervention by means of a full leg cast with (LEU, n = 15) or without (CON, n = 15) daily leucine supplementation (2.5 g leucine, three times daily). Prior to and directly after immobilization, quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (computed tomography (CT) scan) and leg strength (one-repetition maximum (1-RM)) were assessed. Furthermore, muscle biopsies were taken in both groups before and after immobilization to assess changes in type I and type II muscle fiber CSA. Results: Quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) declined in the CON and LEU groups (p < 0.01), with no differences between the two groups (from 7712 ± 324 to 7287 ± 305 mm2 and from 7643 ± 317 to 7164 ± 328 mm2; p = 0.61, respectively). Leg muscle strength decreased from 56 ± 4 to 53 ± 4 kg in the CON group and from 63 ± 3 to 55 ± 2 kg in the LEU group (main effect of time p < 0.01), with no differences between the groups (p = 0.052). Type I and II muscle fiber size did not change significantly over time, in both groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Free leucine supplementation with each of the three main meals (7.5 g/d) does not attenuate the decline of muscle mass and strength during a 7-day limb immobilization intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dietary Supplements)
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Open AccessArticle In Silico Investigation of the Pharmacological Mechanisms of Beneficial Effects of Ginkgo biloba L. on Alzheimer’s Disease
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050589
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 10 May 2018
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Abstract
Based on compelling experimental and clinical evidence, Ginkgo biloba L. exerts a beneficial effect in ameliorating mild to moderate dementia in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurological disorders, although the pharmacological mechanisms remain unknown. In the present study, compounds, their putative
[...] Read more.
Based on compelling experimental and clinical evidence, Ginkgo biloba L. exerts a beneficial effect in ameliorating mild to moderate dementia in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurological disorders, although the pharmacological mechanisms remain unknown. In the present study, compounds, their putative target proteins identified using an inverse docking approach, and clinically tested AD-related target proteins were systematically integrated together with applicable bioinformatics methods in silico. The results suggested that the beneficial effects of G. biloba on AD may be contributed by the regulation of hormone sensitivity, improvements in endocrine homeostasis, maintenance of endothelial microvascular integrity, and proteolysis of tau proteins, particularly prior to amyloid β-protein (Aβ) plaque formation. Moreover, we identified six putative protein targets that are significantly related to AD, but have not been researched or have had only preliminary studies conducted on the anti-AD effects of G. biloba. These mechanisms and protein targets are very significant for future scientific research. In addition, the existing mechanisms were also verified, such as the reduction of oxidative stress, anti-apoptotic effects, and protective effects against amyloidogenesis and Aβ aggregation. The discoveries summarized here may provide a macroscopic perspective that will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of medicinal plants or dietary supplements, as well as new clues for the future development of therapeutic strategies for AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dietary Supplements)
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Open AccessArticle Chemopreventive Activities of Sulforaphane and Its Metabolites in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 585; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050585
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 9 May 2018
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Abstract
Sulforaphane (SFN) exhibits chemopreventive effects through various mechanisms. However, few studies have focused on the bioactivities of its metabolites. Here, three metabolites derived from SFN were studied, known as sulforaphane glutathione, sulforaphane cysteine and sulforaphane-N-acetylcysteine. Their effects on cell viability, DNA
[...] Read more.
Sulforaphane (SFN) exhibits chemopreventive effects through various mechanisms. However, few studies have focused on the bioactivities of its metabolites. Here, three metabolites derived from SFN were studied, known as sulforaphane glutathione, sulforaphane cysteine and sulforaphane-N-acetylcysteine. Their effects on cell viability, DNA damage, tumorigenicity, cell migration and adhesion were measured in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, and their anti-angiogenetic effects were determined in a 3D co-culture model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and pericytes. Results indicated that these metabolites at high doses decreased cancer cell viability, induced DNA damage and inhibited motility, and impaired endothelial cell migration and tube formation. Additionally, pre-treatment with low doses of SFN metabolites protected against H2O2 challenge. The activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway and the induction of intracellular glutathione (GSH) played an important role in the cytoprotective effects of SFN metabolites. In conclusion, SFN metabolites exhibited similar cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects to SFN, which proves the necessity to study the mechanisms of action of not only SFN but also of its metabolites. Based on the different tissue distribution profiles of these metabolites, the most relevant chemical forms can be selected for targeted chemoprevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dietary Supplements)
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