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Special Issue "Dietary Minerals"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Ian J. Griffin (Website)

UC Davis Children's Hospital, 2516 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
Interests: Mineral metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For decades mineral nutrients have been known to be vital for human health, and their deficiency has been known to be a serious global public health concern. In recent years we have learnt much about the mechanistic roles that minerals play in cell biology, mineral-nutrient interactions, and mineral-gene interactions; and minerals have been shown to be important in an ever-increasing range of biological processes.
Parallel to this increased understanding of basic biological processes, there has been an explosion in ideas to tackle population-wide mineral deficiencies. Some of these ideas depend on cutting edge basic science (such as the generation of transgenic food sources and biofortification), others rely on changes in public policy, education and social marketing.
In this Special Issue we wish to address the entire range of advances in mineral research that will help to understand and mitigate the burden of mineral deficiencies in developed and developing world populations.

These may including the roles of

  • bench research
  • population-based surveys of mineral status
  • assessment of mineral status in high-risk population
  • nutritional interventions programs
  • behavioral modifications and social marketing

Dr. Ian J. Griffin
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • Micromineral
  • Macrominerals
  • Trace minerals
  • Global health
  • Biofortification
  • Nutritional deficiencies
  • Nutrient intake
  • Food supplementation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Sodium Intakes of US Children and Adults from Foods and Beverages by Location of Origin and by Specific Food Source
Nutrients 2013, 5(6), 1840-1855; doi:10.3390/nu5061840
Received: 5 March 2013 / Revised: 8 May 2013 / Accepted: 13 May 2013 / Published: 28 May 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (777 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Sodium intakes, from foods and beverages, of 22,852 persons in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES 2003–2008) were examined by specific food source and by food location of origin. Analyses were based on a single 24-h recall. Separate analyses were [...] Read more.
Sodium intakes, from foods and beverages, of 22,852 persons in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES 2003–2008) were examined by specific food source and by food location of origin. Analyses were based on a single 24-h recall. Separate analyses were conducted for children (6–11 years of age), adolescents (12–19), and adults (20–50 and ≥51 years). Grouping of like foods (e.g., food sources) used a scheme proposed by the National Cancer Institute, which divides foods/beverages into 96 food subgroups (e.g., pizza, yeast breads or cold cuts). Food locations of origin were stores (e.g., grocery, convenience and specialty stores), quick-service restaurant/pizza (QSR), full-service restaurant (FSR), school, or other. Food locations of sodium were also evaluated by race/ethnicity amongst adults. Stores provided between 58.1% and 65.2% of dietary sodium, whereas QSR and FSR together provided between 18.9% and 31.8% depending on age. The proportion of sodium from QSR varied from 10.1% to 19.9%, whereas that from FSR varied from 3.4% to 13.3%. School meals provided 10.4% of sodium for 6–11 year olds and 6.0% for 12–19 year olds. Pizza from QSR, the top away from home food item, provided 5.4% of sodium in adolescents. QSR pizza, chicken, burgers and Mexican dishes combined provided 7.8% of total sodium in adult diets. Most sodium came from foods purchased in stores. Food manufacturers, restaurants, and grocery stores all have a role to play in reducing the amount of sodium in the American diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Minerals)
Open AccessArticle Neonatal Phosphate Nutrition Alters in Vivo and in Vitro Satellite Cell Activity in Pigs
Nutrients 2012, 4(6), 436-448; doi:10.3390/nu4060436
Received: 29 April 2012 / Revised: 22 May 2012 / Accepted: 24 May 2012 / Published: 31 May 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (218 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Satellite cell activity is necessary for postnatal skeletal muscle growth. Severe phosphate (PO4) deficiency can alter satellite cell activity, however the role of neonatal PO4 nutrition on satellite cell biology remains obscure. Twenty-one piglets (1 day of age, 1.8 ± 0.2 kg BW) were pair-fed liquid diets that were either PO4 adequate (0.9% total P), supra-adequate (1.2% total P) in PO4 requirement or deficient (0.7% total P) in PO4 content for 12 days. Body weight was recorded daily and blood samples collected every 6 days. At day 12, pigs were orally dosed with BrdU and 12 h later, satellite cells were isolated. Satellite cells were also cultured in vitro for 7 days to determine if PO4 nutrition alters their ability to proceed through their myogenic lineage. Dietary PO4 deficiency resulted in reduced (P < 0.05) sera PO4 and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations, while supra-adequate dietary PO4 improved (P < 0.05) feed conversion efficiency as compared to the PO4 adequate group. In vivo satellite cell proliferation was reduced (P < 0.05) among the PO4 deficient pigs, and these cells had altered in vitro expression of markers of myogenic progression. Further work to better understand early nutritional programming of satellite cells and the potential benefits of emphasizing early PO4 nutrition for future lean growth potential is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Minerals)

Review

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Open AccessReview Vitamin D — Effects on Skeletal and Extraskeletal Health and the Need for Supplementation
Nutrients 2013, 5(1), 111-148; doi:10.3390/nu5010111
Received: 15 October 2012 / Revised: 21 November 2012 / Accepted: 13 December 2012 / Published: 10 January 2013
Cited by 108 | PDF Full-text (6394 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, has received a lot of attention recently as a result of a meteoric rise in the number of publications showing that vitamin D plays a crucial role in a plethora of physiological functions and associating vitamin D [...] Read more.
Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, has received a lot of attention recently as a result of a meteoric rise in the number of publications showing that vitamin D plays a crucial role in a plethora of physiological functions and associating vitamin D deficiency with many acute and chronic illnesses including disorders of calcium metabolism, autoimmune diseases, some cancers, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and infectious diseases. Vitamin D deficiency is now recognized as a global pandemic. The major cause for vitamin D deficiency is the lack of appreciation that sun exposure has been and continues to be the major source of vitamin D for children and adults of all ages. Vitamin D plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of a healthy skeleton throughout life. There remains some controversy regarding what blood level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D should be attained for both bone health and reducing risk for vitamin D deficiency associated acute and chronic diseases and how much vitamin D should be supplemented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Minerals)
Open AccessReview Vitamin D Interactions with Soy Isoflavones on Bone after Menopause: A Review
Nutrients 2012, 4(11), 1610-1621; doi:10.3390/nu4111610
Received: 17 August 2012 / Revised: 26 October 2012 / Accepted: 30 October 2012 / Published: 6 November 2012
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (606 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Vitamin D is known to increase Ca absorption in adults. However, the threshold vitamin D status to benefit Ca absorption is lower than the target vitamin D status for higher bone mineral density and lower fracture risk, pointing to another pathway for [...] Read more.
Vitamin D is known to increase Ca absorption in adults. However, the threshold vitamin D status to benefit Ca absorption is lower than the target vitamin D status for higher bone mineral density and lower fracture risk, pointing to another pathway for vitamin D to benefit bone. One possibility is by affecting osteoblast and osteoclasts directly. Vitamin D-related bone metabolism may also be affected by soy isoflavones, which selectively bind to the estrogen receptor β and may reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women. We discuss a possible synergistic effect of soy isoflavones and vitamin D on bone by affecting osteoblast and osteoclast formation and activity in postmenopausal women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Minerals)
Open AccessReview Plant Calcium Content: Ready to Remodel
Nutrients 2012, 4(8), 1120-1136; doi:10.3390/nu4081120
Received: 21 June 2012 / Revised: 12 July 2012 / Accepted: 31 July 2012 / Published: 21 August 2012
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (2536 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These [...] Read more.
By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These insights should allow for better strategies for increasing the nutritional content of foods. In particular, the use of preparation-free elemental imaging technologies such as synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy in plant biology may allow researchers to understand the relationship between subcellular location and nutrient bioavailability. These approaches may lead to better strategies for altering the location of calcium within the plant to maximize its absorption from fruits and vegetables. These modified foods could be part of a diet for children and adults identified as at-risk for low calcium intake or absorption with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and severity of inadequate bone mineralization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Minerals)

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