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Special Issue "Relationship between Nutrition and Respiratory Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 May 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Stan Kubow

School of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill University, Quebec, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: phytochemicals; oxidative stress; antioxidants; microbiome; digestion
Guest Editor
Prof. Larry C. Lands

Department of Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine, McGill University, Quebec, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: lung disease; functional ability; immune modulation; nutrition; vitamin D

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lung disease is the fourth leading cause of death. Lung health is directly impacted by our environment, which includes our diet. We have evolved to live in an oxygen-rich, and now pollutant-ladened, environment. This challenges our anti-oxidant defenses, which rely on exogenous dietary sources and enzymatic pathways. Nutrition impacts lung growth and development and has the potential to prevent and aid in the treatment of lung disease. This symposium will address several areas of active research, and highlight our current state of knowledge and ongoing controversies. The following areas will be addressed: 

  • the impact of pre- and post-natal nutrition on lung growth
  • the role of breastfeeding, and confounding factors, in the prevention of asthma
  • nutritional requirements in the lung transplant recipient
  • antioxidants in oxidant-induced lung disease
  • the impact of the microbiome in lung health
Prof. Stan Kubow
Prof. Larry C. Lands
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lung
  • Nutrition
  • Antioxidants
  • Breastfeeding
  • post-lung transplantation
  • inflammation
  • probiotics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Pharmacological Investigation of the Anti-Inflammation and Anti-Oxidation Activities of Diallyl Disulfide in a Rat Emphysema Model Induced by Cigarette Smoke Extract
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 79; doi:10.3390/nu10010079
Received: 12 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 9 January 2018 / Published: 12 January 2018
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Abstract
Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is the main organosulfur ingredient in garlic, with known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DADS on reducing the inflammation and redox imbalance in a rat emphysema model that was
[...] Read more.
Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is the main organosulfur ingredient in garlic, with known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DADS on reducing the inflammation and redox imbalance in a rat emphysema model that was induced by intraperitoneal injection of cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Briefly, DADS exerted an anti-inflammation effect on emphysema rats through decreasing cell influx in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressing pro-inflammation cytokine production including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) via inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. In addition, levels of oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were reduced, while the activities of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) were markedly enhanced by DADS. Moreover, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression were down-regulated by DADS. Furthermore, the regulation effects of DADS on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed. In conclusion, these encouraging findings suggest that DADS could be considered as a promising anti-inflammation and antioxidative agent for the treatment of emphysema. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Relationship between Nutrition and Respiratory Disease)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Donor Human Milk Protects against Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2018, 10(2), 238; doi:10.3390/nu10020238
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 20 February 2018
PDF Full-text (3359 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication after preterm birth. Pasteurized donor human milk (DHM) has increasingly become the standard of care for very preterm infants over the use of preterm formula (PF) if the mother’s own milk (MOM) is unavailable. Studies
[...] Read more.
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication after preterm birth. Pasteurized donor human milk (DHM) has increasingly become the standard of care for very preterm infants over the use of preterm formula (PF) if the mother’s own milk (MOM) is unavailable. Studies have reported beneficial effects of DHM on BPD. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies on the effects of DHM on BPD and other respiratory outcomes. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of RCTs could not demonstrate that supplementation of MOM with DHM reduced BPD when compared to PF (three studies, risk ratio (RR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60–1.32). However, meta-analysis of observational studies showed that DHM supplementation reduced BPD (8 studies, RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.67–0.90). An exclusive human milk diet reduced the risk of BPD, compared to a diet with PF and/or bovine milk-based fortifier (three studies, RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.68–0.95). Feeding raw MOM, compared to feeding pasteurized MOM, protected against BPD (two studies, RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62–0.96). In conclusion, our data suggest that DHM protects against BPD in very preterm infants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Relationship between Nutrition and Respiratory Disease)
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