E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Omega-3 Update"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Dr. Peter Howe (Website)

Director, Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
Fax: +618 8302 2178
Interests: role of diet and exercise in health optimisation - impact on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors and elucidation of underlying mechanisms; development of an integrated approach (diet, lifestyle and drugs) to risk management; food sources and intake recommendations for omega-3 and other bioactive nutrients

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recognition of the diverse health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids and their significance for population health has been one of the most fascinating developments in nutritional science. However, before its full impact can be realised, there are still many scientific challenges to be addressed as health policy, delivery and environmental issues are resolved. At the same time, knowledge of physiological functions and health benefits continues to expand and diversify in areas of growing need, such as metabolic and mental health. The purpose of this special issue is to update progress in selected of fields of omega-3 research endeavour.

Prof. Dr. Peter Howe
Editor-in-Chief

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Do Pregnant Women and Those at Risk of Developing Post-Natal Depression Consume Lower Amounts of Long Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids?
Nutrients 2010, 2(2), 198-213; doi:10.3390/nu2020198
Received: 28 January 2010 / Accepted: 11 February 2010 / Published: 21 February 2010
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (241 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aims were to compare intakes of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC n-3 PUFA) in pregnant and non-pregnant women in Australia and to compare these intakes to the Australian National Nutrition Survey of 1995 (NNS95) [1] and to determine if [...] Read more.
The aims were to compare intakes of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC n-3 PUFA) in pregnant and non-pregnant women in Australia and to compare these intakes to the Australian National Nutrition Survey of 1995 (NNS95) [1] and to determine if the LC n-3 PUFA intakes differed in women who may be ‘at risk’ compared with women ‘not at risk’ of developing post-natal depression (PND). A validated LC n-3 PUFA food frequency questionnaire and pregnant women’s Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) scores were used. LC n-3 PUFA intakes were comparable to the NNS95 but did not differ due to pregnancy or whether or not a woman is at risk of developing PND. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Update)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Long-Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids May Be Beneficial for Reducing Obesity—A Review
Nutrients 2010, 2(12), 1212-1230; doi:10.3390/nu2121212
Received: 4 November 2010 / Revised: 1 December 2010 / Accepted: 8 December 2010 / Published: 9 December 2010
Cited by 66 | PDF Full-text (292 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Current recommendations for counteracting obesity advocate the consumption of a healthy diet and participation in regular physical activity, but many individuals have difficulty complying with these recommendations. Studies in rodents and humans have indicated that long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 [...] Read more.
Current recommendations for counteracting obesity advocate the consumption of a healthy diet and participation in regular physical activity, but many individuals have difficulty complying with these recommendations. Studies in rodents and humans have indicated that long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) potentially elicit a number of effects which might be useful for reducing obesity, including suppression of appetite, improvements in circulation which might facilitate nutrient delivery to skeletal muscle and changes in gene expression which shift metabolism toward increased accretion of lean tissue, enhanced fat oxidation and energy expenditure and reduced fat deposition. While LC n-3 PUFA supplementation has been shown to reduce obesity in rodents, evidence in humans is limited. Epidemiological associations between LC n-3 PUFA intakes and obesity are inconclusive but small cross-sectional studies have demonstrated inverse relationships between markers of LC n-3 PUFA status and markers of obesity. Human intervention trials indicate potential benefits of LC n-3 PUFA supplementation, especially when combined with energy-restricted diets or exercise, but more well-controlled and long-term trials are needed to confirm these effects and identify mechanisms of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Update)
Open AccessReview Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils–An Update on Sustainable Sources
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 572-585; doi:10.3390/nu2060572
Received: 1 March 2010 / Revised: 30 April 2010 / Accepted: 20 May 2010 / Published: 26 May 2010
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (290 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Seafood is currently the best and generally a safe source of long-chain (LC, (≥C20) omega-3 oils amongst the common food groups. LC omega-3 oils are also obtained in lower amounts per serve from red meat, egg and selected other foods. [...] Read more.
Seafood is currently the best and generally a safe source of long-chain (LC, (≥C20) omega-3 oils amongst the common food groups. LC omega-3 oils are also obtained in lower amounts per serve from red meat, egg and selected other foods. As global population increases the opportunities to increase seafood harvest are limited, therefore new alternate sources are required. Emerging sources include microalgae and under-utilized resources such as Southern Ocean krill. Prospects for new land plant sources of these unique and health-benefiting oils are also particularly promising, offering hope for alternate and sustainable supplies of these key oils, with resulting health, social, economic and environmental benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Update)
Open AccessReview Omega-3 Index and Sudden Cardiac Death
Nutrients 2010, 2(3), 375-388; doi:10.3390/nu2030375
Received: 1 March 2010 / Revised: 9 March 2010 / Accepted: 10 March 2010 / Published: 23 March 2010
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unresolved health issue, and responsible for 15% of all deaths in Western countries. Epidemiologic evidence, as well as evidence from clinical trials, indicates that increasing intake and high levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid [...] Read more.
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unresolved health issue, and responsible for 15% of all deaths in Western countries. Epidemiologic evidence, as well as evidence from clinical trials, indicates that increasing intake and high levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) protect from SCD and other major adverse cardiac events. Levels of EPA+DHA are best assessed by the Omega-3 Index, representing the red cell fatty acid content of EPA+DHA. Work is in progress that will further define the value of the Omega-3 Index as a risk factor for SCD, other cardiac events, and as target for treatment with EPA+DHA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Update)
Open AccessReview Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Inflammatory Processes
Nutrients 2010, 2(3), 355-374; doi:10.3390/nu2030355
Received: 20 February 2010 / Revised: 16 March 2010 / Accepted: 16 March 2010 / Published: 18 March 2010
Cited by 97 | PDF Full-text (171 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Long chain fatty acids influence inflammation through a variety of mechanisms; many of these are mediated by, or at least associated with, changes in fatty acid composition of cell membranes. Changes in these compositions can modify membrane fluidity, cell signaling leading to [...] Read more.
Long chain fatty acids influence inflammation through a variety of mechanisms; many of these are mediated by, or at least associated with, changes in fatty acid composition of cell membranes. Changes in these compositions can modify membrane fluidity, cell signaling leading to altered gene expression, and the pattern of lipid mediator production. Cell involved in the inflammatory response are typically rich in the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, but the contents of arachidonic acid and of the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can be altered through oral administration of EPA and DHA. Eicosanoids produced from arachidonic acid have roles in inflammation. EPA also gives rise to eicosanoids and these often have differing properties from those of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids. EPA and DHA give rise to newly discovered resolvins which are anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving. Increased membrane content of EPA and DHA (and decreased arachidonic acid content) results in a changed pattern of production of eicosanoids and resolvins. Changing the fatty acid composition of cells involved in the inflammatory response also affects production of peptide mediators of inflammation (adhesion molecules, cytokines etc.). Thus, the fatty acid composition of cells involved in the inflammatory response influences their function; the contents of arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA appear to be especially important. The anti-inflammatory effects of marine n-3 PUFAs suggest that they may be useful as therapeutic agents in disorders with an inflammatory component. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Update)
Open AccessReview Oiling the Brain: A Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychopathology across the Lifespan
Nutrients 2010, 2(2), 128-170; doi:10.3390/nu2020128
Received: 3 December 2009 / Accepted: 3 February 2010 / Published: 9 February 2010
Cited by 43 | PDF Full-text (303 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Around one in four people suffer from mental illness at some stage in their lifetime. There is increasing awareness of the importance of nutrition, particularly omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), for optimal brain development and function. Hence in recent decades, researchers [...] Read more.
Around one in four people suffer from mental illness at some stage in their lifetime. There is increasing awareness of the importance of nutrition, particularly omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), for optimal brain development and function. Hence in recent decades, researchers have explored effects of n-3 PUFA on mental health problems over the lifespan, from developmental disorders in childhood, to depression, aggression, and schizophrenia in adulthood, and cognitive decline, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in late adulthood. This review provides an updated overview of the published and the registered clinical trials that investigate effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation on mental health and behavior, highlighting methodological differences and issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Update)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Nutrients Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
nutrients@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Nutrients
Back to Top