Special Issue "DCE-MRI in Preclinical Imaging"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Veerle Kersemans

Department of Oncology, CRUK/MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Off Roosevelt Drive, Churchill Hospital, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK
E-Mail
Phone: +44 186 585 7124
Fax: +44 186 585 7127

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a method of investigating microvascular structure and function by tracking the pharmacokinetics of injected low-molecular weight contrast agents as they pass through the tumour vasculature. It is sensitive to changes in tumour blood perfusion and vascular permeability and has been applied for cancer detection, characterisation, staging and therapy monitoring. The technique is promising and has been proposed as a method to improve the diagnostic specificity of MRI.

The accuracy of DCE-MRI relies on the ability to model the pharmacokinetics of an injected contrast agent, using the signal intensity changes on sequential magnetic resonance images. Depending on the application, DCE-MRI measurements have included semi-quantitative analysis of the time-intensity curves such as the maximal enhancement, time to peak enhancement, enhancement gradient and signal enhancement ratio, or quantitative pharmacokinetic modelling parameters such as Ktrans.

This collection of reviews provides an overview of DCE-MRI in preclinical imaging, from image acquisition and data analysis methods to its applications and translation into clinic. Proposed topics covered in special issue:

  • Image acquisition and quantification
  • Arterial input function, a requisite for quantitative DCE-MRI analysis?
  • Validation of DCE-MRI
  • Applications for DCE-MRI: an overview
  • DCE-MRI as an imaging biomarker for anti-vascular therapy
  • DCE-MRI in radiation therapy applications
  • Preclinical DCE-MRI and its translation into clinic

Dr Veerle Kersemans
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • DCE-MRI
  • quantification
  • arterial input function
  • applications
  • imaging biomarker

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Organic Nitrate Maintains Bone Marrow Blood Perfusion in Ovariectomized Female Rats: A Dynamic, Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study
Pharmaceutics 2013, 5(1), 23-35; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics5010023
Received: 9 July 2012 / Revised: 14 December 2012 / Accepted: 17 December 2012 / Published: 21 December 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (926 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of nitrate on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marrow perfusion in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, and also the effects of nitrate on in vitro osteoblastic activity and osteoclastic differentiation of murine monocyte/ macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Female
[...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of nitrate on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marrow perfusion in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, and also the effects of nitrate on in vitro osteoblastic activity and osteoclastic differentiation of murine monocyte/ macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into OVX + nitrate group (isosorbide-5-mononitrate, ISM, 150 mg/kg/ day b.i.d), OVX + vehicle group, and control group. Lumbar spine CT bone densitometry and perfusion MRI were performed on the rats at baseline and week 8 post-OVX. The OVX rats’ BMD decreased by 22.5% ± 5.7% at week 8 (p < 0.001); while the OVX + ISM rats’ BMD decreased by 13.1% ± 2.7% (p < 0.001). The BMD loss difference between the two groups of rats was significant (p = 0.018). The OVX rats’ lumbar vertebral perfusion MRI maximum enhancement (Emax) decreased by 10.3% ± 5.0% at week 8 (p < 0.005), while in OVX + ISM rats, the Emax increased by 5.5% ± 6.9% (p > 0.05). The proliferation of osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells increased significantly with ISM treatment at 0.78 µM to 50 μM. Treatment of UMR-106 cells with ISM also stimulated the BrdU uptake. After the RAW 264.7 cells were co-treated with osteoclastogenesis inducer RANKL and 6.25 μM ~ 100 μM of ISM for 3 days, a trend of dose-dependent increase of osteoclast number was noted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DCE-MRI in Preclinical Imaging)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) in Preclinical Studies of Antivascular Treatments
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 563-589; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040563
Received: 29 June 2012 / Revised: 29 October 2012 / Accepted: 30 October 2012 / Published: 7 November 2012
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (286 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Antivascular treatments can either be antiangiogenic or targeting established tumour vasculature. These treatments affect the tumour microvasculature and microenvironment but may not change clinical measures like tumour volume and growth. In research on antivascular treatments, information on the tumour vasculature is therefore essential.
[...] Read more.
Antivascular treatments can either be antiangiogenic or targeting established tumour vasculature. These treatments affect the tumour microvasculature and microenvironment but may not change clinical measures like tumour volume and growth. In research on antivascular treatments, information on the tumour vasculature is therefore essential. Preclinical research is often used for optimization of antivascular drugs alone or in combined treatments. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is an in vivo imaging method providing vascular information, which has become an important tool in both preclinical and clinical research. This review discusses common DCE-MRI imaging protocols and analysis methods and provides an overview of preclinical research on antivascular treatments utilizing DCE-MRI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DCE-MRI in Preclinical Imaging)
Figures

Open AccessReview Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(3), 442-478; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4030442
Received: 20 July 2012 / Revised: 1 September 2012 / Accepted: 10 September 2012 / Published: 19 September 2012
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (537 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and
[...] Read more.
Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DCE-MRI in Preclinical Imaging)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Pharmaceutics Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
pharmaceutics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Pharmaceutics
Back to Top