Special Issue "Microwave Photonics"

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A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Yifei Li (Website)

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Mass Dartmouth, MA 02747, USA
Phone: 2535086916
Interests: mcirowave photonics; photonic integrated circuits; laser nonlinear dynamics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microwave photonics is an inter-disciplinary field that bridges photonics and microwave electronics. It aims to apply photonic solutions to microwave applications for achieving superior performance in terms of bandwidth, insertion loss, dynamic range, size, weight, efficiency and power.  Microwave photonics serves as an enabling technology in a wide variety of applications such as GHz and THz signal generation and distribution, high-speed wireless communication networks, radar systems and sensors.

This Special Issue is intended to encourage researchers worldwide to report the new advances in microwave photonics. Original research papers on the following technical areas of microwave photonics are welcome: (i) high speed photonic devices; (ii) integration technologies for microwave photonic devices and subsystems; (iii) optical generation and detection of microwave / THz signals; (iv) optical processing and control of microwave signals; (v) photonics for antennas and beamforming; (vi) microwave photonics for biomedical applications; (vii) radio over fiber systems; (viii) other innovative applications of microwave photonics.

Prof. Yifei Li
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • antenna remoting
  • photonic integration
  • microwave generations
  • microwave photonic filtering
  • RF photonic links
  • optical beamforming
  • radio over fiber

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Dental Imaging Using Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography: An ex Vivo Feasibility Study
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 488-502; doi:10.3390/photonics1040488
Received: 30 October 2014 / Revised: 27 November 2014 / Accepted: 27 November 2014 / Published: 3 December 2014
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Abstract
Some dental lesions are difficult to detect with traditional anatomical imaging methods, such as, with visual observation, dental radiography and X-ray computed tomography (CT). Therefore, we investigated the viability of using an optical imaging technique, Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (MFMT) to retrieve [...] Read more.
Some dental lesions are difficult to detect with traditional anatomical imaging methods, such as, with visual observation, dental radiography and X-ray computed tomography (CT). Therefore, we investigated the viability of using an optical imaging technique, Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (MFMT) to retrieve molecular contrast in dental samples. To establish feasibility of obtaining 3-D images in teeth using MFMT, molecular contrast was simulated using a dye-filled capillary that was placed in the lower half of human tooth ex vivo. The dye and excitation wavelength were chosen to be excited at 650–660 nm in order to simulate a carious lesion. The location of the capillary was varied by changing the depth from the surface at which the dye, at various concentrations, was introduced. MFMT reconstructions were benchmarked against micro-CT. Overall; MFMT exhibited a location accuracy of ~15% and a volume accuracy of ~15%, up to 2 mm depth with moderate dye concentrations. These results demonstrate the potential of MFMT to retrieve molecular contrast in 3-D in highly scattering tissues, such as teeth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Photonics)
Open AccessArticle WDM Optical Access Network for Full-Duplex and Reconfigurable Capacity Assignment Based on PolMUX Technique
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 503-515; doi:10.3390/photonics1040503
Received: 17 October 2014 / Revised: 24 November 2014 / Accepted: 24 November 2014 / Published: 3 December 2014
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Abstract
We present a novel bidirectional WDM-based optical access network featuring reconfigurable capacity assignment. The architecture relies on the PolMUX technique allowing a compact, flexible, and bandwidth-efficient router in addition to source-free ONUs and color-less ONUs for cost/complexity minimization. Moreover, the centralized architecture [...] Read more.
We present a novel bidirectional WDM-based optical access network featuring reconfigurable capacity assignment. The architecture relies on the PolMUX technique allowing a compact, flexible, and bandwidth-efficient router in addition to source-free ONUs and color-less ONUs for cost/complexity minimization. Moreover, the centralized architecture contemplates remote management and control of polarization. High-quality transmission of digital signals is demonstrated through different routing scenarios where all channels are dynamically assigned in both downlink and uplink directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Photonics)
Open AccessArticle Linearization Technologies for Broadband Radio-Over-Fiber Transmission Systems
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 455-472; doi:10.3390/photonics1040455
Received: 30 October 2014 / Revised: 21 November 2014 / Accepted: 22 November 2014 / Published: 26 November 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1107 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Linearization technologies that can be used for linearizing RoF transmission are reviewed. Three main linearization methods, i.e. electrical analog linearization, optical linearization, and electrical digital linearization are presented and compared. Analog linearization can be achieved using analog predistortion circuits, and can be [...] Read more.
Linearization technologies that can be used for linearizing RoF transmission are reviewed. Three main linearization methods, i.e. electrical analog linearization, optical linearization, and electrical digital linearization are presented and compared. Analog linearization can be achieved using analog predistortion circuits, and can be used for suppression of odd order nonlinear distortion components, such as third and fifth order. Optical linearization includes mixed-polarization, dual-wavelength, optical channelization and the others, implemented in optical domain, to suppress both even and odd order nonlinear distortion components, such as second and third order. Digital predistortion has been a widely used linearization method for RF power amplifiers. However, digital linearization that requires analog to digital converter is severely limited to hundreds of MHz bandwidth. Instead, analog and optical linearization provide broadband linearization with up to tens of GHz. Therefore, for broadband radio over fiber transmission that can be used for future broadband cloud radio access networks, analog and optical linearization are more appropriate than digital linearization. Generally speaking, both analog and optical linearization are able to improve spur-free dynamic range greater than 10 dB over tens of GHz. In order for current digital linearization to be used for broadband radio over fiber transmission, the reduced linearization complexity and increased linearization bandwidth are required. Moreover, some digital linearization methods in which the complexity can be reduced, such as Hammerstein type, may be more promising and require further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Photonics)
Open AccessArticle FTTA System Demo Using Optical Fiber-Coupled Active Antennas
Photonics 2014, 1(3), 198-210; doi:10.3390/photonics1030198
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 24 July 2014 / Accepted: 29 July 2014 / Published: 5 August 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6439 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The convergence of optical and wireless systems such as Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) networks is the key to coping with the increasing bandwidth demands due to the increasing popularity of video and other high data rate applications. A high level of integration of optical [...] Read more.
The convergence of optical and wireless systems such as Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) networks is the key to coping with the increasing bandwidth demands due to the increasing popularity of video and other high data rate applications. A high level of integration of optical technologies enables simple base stations with a fiber-to-the-antenna (FTTA) approach. In this paper, we present a complete full-duplex RoF–FTTA system consisting of integrated active fiber-coupled optical receiving and transmitting antennas that are directly connected to a standard single mode fiber optical link. Data rates up to 1 Gbit/s could be shown without advanced modulation formats on a 1.5 GHz carrier frequency. The antennas as well as the whole system are explained and the results of the system experiments are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Photonics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Dispersive Fourier Transformation for Versatile Microwave Photonics Applications
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 586-612; doi:10.3390/photonics1040586
Received: 15 November 2014 / Revised: 12 December 2014 / Accepted: 12 December 2014 / Published: 18 December 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (967 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dispersive Fourier transformation (DFT) maps the broadband spectrum of an ultrashort optical pulse into a time stretched waveform with its intensity profile mirroring the spectrum using chromatic dispersion. Owing to its capability of continuous pulse-by-pulse spectroscopic measurement and manipulation, DFT has become [...] Read more.
Dispersive Fourier transformation (DFT) maps the broadband spectrum of an ultrashort optical pulse into a time stretched waveform with its intensity profile mirroring the spectrum using chromatic dispersion. Owing to its capability of continuous pulse-by-pulse spectroscopic measurement and manipulation, DFT has become an emerging technique for ultrafast signal generation and processing, and high-throughput real-time measurements, where the speed of traditional optical instruments falls short. In this paper, the principle and implementation methods of DFT are first introduced and the recent development in employing DFT technique for widespread microwave photonics applications are presented, with emphasis on real-time spectroscopy, microwave arbitrary waveform generation, and microwave spectrum sensing. Finally, possible future research directions for DFT-based microwave photonics techniques are discussed as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Photonics)
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