Special Issue "Photonic Crystal Sensors"

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A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alan X. Wang

School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science , Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-5501, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nano-photonic devices based on photonic crystals and surface plasmonics; optical interconnects for board-to-board and chip-to-chip; optical sensors using surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and infrared absorption; nonlinear optical devices using state-of-the-art polymer materials: electro-optic modulators and all-optical switching; RF photonic devices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the past two decades, photonic crystal sensors have gained tremendous amount of research interests due to the ultra-compact size, high sensitivity, and ease of integration into various platforms. Compared with conventional optical fiber and waveguide-based sensors, photonic crystals offer unique properties that can be obtained from the photonic bandgap structures. For example, slow-light enhanced photonic crystal waveguide and high Q-factor photonic crystal microcavity have been demonstrated for ultra-sensitive gas sensing and biomarker detection.

This Special issue covers a large scope of research in photonic crystal sensors, and solicits contributions in, but not limited to:

  • Innovative photonic crystal sensor structures: photonic crystal slot waveguides, photonic crystal microcavities, photonic crystal fibers, bio-inspired and bio-enabled photonic crystals, metallic photonic crystals, and etc.
  • New sensing mechanisms on photonic crystal devices: refractive index sensing, UV-Vis-IR absorption, Raman scattering, fluorescence, or combination of multiplex sensing mechanisms
  • Broad engineering applications of photonic crystal sensors: gas sensors, chemical sensors, and biosensors
  • Photonic crystal sensors based on emerging materials: silicon, organic materials, biological materials, metals, transparent conductive oxides, and 2-D materials
  • Clinical applications of photonic crystal sensors, especially for cancer biomarker detections

Dr. Alan X. Wang
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • photonic crystal slabs
  • photonic crystal waveguides
  • photonic crystal fibers
  • photonic bandgap
  • slow-light effects
  • optical sensors
  • biomedical devices

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Characteristics of Resonantly-Guided Modes in Microstructured Optical Fibers
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 432-441; doi:10.3390/photonics1040432
Received: 28 October 2014 / Revised: 19 November 2014 / Accepted: 19 November 2014 / Published: 21 November 2014
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Abstract
Modal characteristics of resonantly-guided modes (RGMs) in microstructured fibers were investigated through numerical simulation. The modes of interest are supported in a class of fibers consisting of a circularly arranged periodic array of high index rods embedded in a low index cladding. Light
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Modal characteristics of resonantly-guided modes (RGMs) in microstructured fibers were investigated through numerical simulation. The modes of interest are supported in a class of fibers consisting of a circularly arranged periodic array of high index rods embedded in a low index cladding. Light is confined and guided by the guided-mode resonance (GMR) that the rod array exhibit. According to the numerical analysis we clarified that duplicated transverse modes having the same radial mode number for TM and TE modes were supported. Also the existence and detailed mode profiles of hybrid modes were confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystal Sensors)
Open AccessArticle Fibre Coupled Photonic Crystal Cavity Arrays on Transparent Substrates for Spatially Resolved Sensing
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 412-420; doi:10.3390/photonics1040412
Received: 14 October 2014 / Revised: 30 October 2014 / Accepted: 30 October 2014 / Published: 3 November 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (554 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We introduce a photonic crystal cavity array realised in a silicon thin film and placed on polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) as a new platform for the in-situ sensing of biomedical processes. Using tapered optical fibres, we show that multiple independent cavities within the same waveguide
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We introduce a photonic crystal cavity array realised in a silicon thin film and placed on polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) as a new platform for the in-situ sensing of biomedical processes. Using tapered optical fibres, we show that multiple independent cavities within the same waveguide can be excited and their resonance wavelength determined from camera images without the need for a spectrometer. The cavity array platform combines sensing as a function of location with sensing as a function of time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystal Sensors)
Open AccessArticle Guided-Mode Resonance Grating with Self-Assembled Silver Nanoparticles for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 380-389; doi:10.3390/photonics1040380
Received: 16 September 2014 / Revised: 20 October 2014 / Accepted: 20 October 2014 / Published: 23 October 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1262 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We designed and fabricated guided-mode resonance (GMR) gratings on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film to generate a significantly enhanced local electric field for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were self-assembled onto the surface of the grating, which can provide a large
[...] Read more.
We designed and fabricated guided-mode resonance (GMR) gratings on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film to generate a significantly enhanced local electric field for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were self-assembled onto the surface of the grating, which can provide a large amount of “hot-spots” for SERS sensing. The ITO gratings also exhibit excellent tolerance to fabrication deviations due to the large refractive index contrast of the ITO grating. Quantitative experimental results of 5,5’-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) demonstrate the best enhancement factor of ~14× on ITO gratings when compared with Ag NPs on a flat ITO film, and the limit of detection (LOD) of DTNB is as low as 10 pM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystal Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Refractive Index Measurement of Liquids Based on Microstructured Optical Fibers
Photonics 2014, 1(4), 516-529; doi:10.3390/photonics1040516
Received: 31 October 2014 / Revised: 3 December 2014 / Accepted: 3 December 2014 / Published: 8 December 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (401 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review is focused on microstructured optical fiber sensors developed in recent years for liquid RI sensing. The review is divided into three parts: the first section introduces a general view of the most relevant refractometric sensors that have been reported over the
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This review is focused on microstructured optical fiber sensors developed in recent years for liquid RI sensing. The review is divided into three parts: the first section introduces a general view of the most relevant refractometric sensors that have been reported over the last thirty years. Section 2 discusses several microstructured optical fiber designs, namely, suspended-core fiber, photonic crystal fiber, large-core air-clad photonic crystal fiber, and others. This part is also divided into two main groups: the interferometric-based and resonance-based configurations. The sensing methods rely either on full/selective filling of the microstructured fiber air holes with a liquid analyte or by simply immersing the sensing fiber into the liquid analyte. The sensitivities and resolutions are tabled at the end of this section followed by a brief discussion of the obtained results. The last section concludes with some remarks about the microstructured fiber-based configurations developed for RI sensing and their potential for future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystal Sensors)

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