Special Issue "Plant Reproductive Transition and Flower Development"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rebecca Lamb

Department of Molecular Genetics, The Ohio State University, 318 W. 12th Ave., 500 Aronoff Laboratory, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: (614)688-4322
Fax: +1-614-292-6345
Interests: the role of transcriptional control during pattern formation; transcriptional regulation; flower development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The transition from vegetative to reproductive development in plants is arguably the most important part of angiosperm life cycles. The transition is also a key to the diversification of this group of plants. In addition, flowering is essential for many aspects of agriculture. Many crops consist of flowers or their products (fruits and seeds); such crops include the cereals that provide most of the calories for a majority of the world’s human and livestock populations. An understanding of the factors that control flowering time, reproductive transition, and the subsequent formation of functional flowers will aid in helping agriculture face a changing environment.

This Special Issue hopes to highlight recent developments in the biology of flowering. Research and review papers on flowering time control, the switch from vegetative to reproductive growth, and flower development are welcome. Papers that extend the scientific knowledge concerning the control of these processes in non-model or developing model plant species are of particular interest.

Dr. Rebecca S. Lamb
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • flowering time
  • phase transition
  • reproductive transition
  • flower development
  • transcriptional control of flowering

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Pistil Smut Infection Increases Ovary Production, Seed Yield Components, and Pseudosexual Reproductive Allocation in Buffalograss
Plants 2014, 3(4), 594-612; doi:10.3390/plants3040594
Received: 18 July 2014 / Revised: 14 November 2014 / Accepted: 19 November 2014 / Published: 1 December 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (546 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sex expression of dioecious buffalograss [Bouteloua dactyloides Columbus (syn. Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.)] is known to be environmentally stable with approximate 1:1, male to female, sex ratios. Here we show that infection by the pistil smut fungus [Salmacisia buchloëana Huff &
[...] Read more.
Sex expression of dioecious buffalograss [Bouteloua dactyloides Columbus (syn. Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.)] is known to be environmentally stable with approximate 1:1, male to female, sex ratios. Here we show that infection by the pistil smut fungus [Salmacisia buchloëana Huff & Chandra (syn. Tilletia buchloëana Kellerman and Swingle)] shifts sex ratios of buffalograss to be nearly 100% phenotypically hermaphroditic. In addition, pistil smut infection decreased vegetative reproductive allocation, increased most seed yield components, and increased pseudosexual reproductive allocation in both sex forms compared to uninfected clones. In female sex forms, pistil smut infection resulted in a 26 fold increase in ovary production and a 35 fold increase in potential harvest index. In male sex forms, pistil smut infection resulted in 2.37 fold increase in floret number and over 95% of these florets contained a well-developed pistil. Although all ovaries of infected plants are filled with fungal teliospores and hence reproductively sterile, an average male-female pair of infected plants exhibited an 87 fold increase in potential harvest index compared to their uninfected clones. Acquiring an ability to mimic the effects of pistil smut infection would enhance our understanding of the flowering process in grasses and our efforts to increase seed yield of buffalograss and perhaps other grasses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Reproductive Transition and Flower Development)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Quantifying the Effects of Photoperiod, Temperature and Daily Irradiance on Flowering Time of Soybean Isolines
Plants 2014, 3(4), 476-497; doi:10.3390/plants3040476
Received: 2 June 2014 / Revised: 10 September 2014 / Accepted: 14 October 2014 / Published: 7 November 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1287 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Soybean isolines with different combinations of photoperiod sensitivity alleles were planted in a greenhouse at different times during the year resulting in natural variation in daily incident irradiance and duration. The time from planting to first flower were observed. Mathematical models, using additive
[...] Read more.
Soybean isolines with different combinations of photoperiod sensitivity alleles were planted in a greenhouse at different times during the year resulting in natural variation in daily incident irradiance and duration. The time from planting to first flower were observed. Mathematical models, using additive and multiplicative modes, were developed to quantify the effect of photoperiod, temperature, photoperiod-temperature interactions, rate of photoperiod change, and daily solar irradiance on flowering time. Observed flowering times correlated with predicted times (R2 = 0.92, Standard Error of the Estimate (SSE) = 2.84 d, multiplicative mode; R2 = 0.91, SSE = 2.88 d, additive mode). The addition of a rate of photoperiod change function and an irradiance function to the temperature and photoperiod functions improved the accuracy of flowering time prediction. The addition of a modified photoperiod function, which allowed for photoperiod sensitivity at shorter photoperiods, improved prediction of flowering time. Both increasing and decreasing rate of photoperiod change, as well as low levels of daily irradiance delayed flowering in soybean. The complete model, which included terms for the rate of photoperiod change, photoperiod, temperature and irradiance, predicted time to first flower in soybean across a range of environmental conditions with an SEE of 3.6 days when tested with independent data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Reproductive Transition and Flower Development)
Open AccessArticle The Half-Size ABC Transporter FOLDED PETALS 2/ABCG13 Is Involved in Petal Elongation through Narrow Spaces in Arabidopsis thaliana Floral Buds
Plants 2014, 3(3), 348-358; doi:10.3390/plants3030348
Received: 20 June 2014 / Revised: 19 July 2014 / Accepted: 11 August 2014 / Published: 15 August 2014
PDF Full-text (979 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Flowers are vital for attracting pollinators to plants and in horticulture for humans. Petal morphogenesis is a central process of floral development. Petal development can be divided into three main processes: the establishment of organ identity in a concentric pattern, primordia initiation at
[...] Read more.
Flowers are vital for attracting pollinators to plants and in horticulture for humans. Petal morphogenesis is a central process of floral development. Petal development can be divided into three main processes: the establishment of organ identity in a concentric pattern, primordia initiation at fixed positions within a whorl, and morphogenesis, which includes petal elongation through the narrow spaces within the bud. Here, we show that the FOLDED PETALS 2 (FOP2) gene, encoding a member of the half-size ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family ABCG13, is involved in straight elongation of petals in Arabidopsis thaliana. In fop2 mutants, flowers open with folded petals, instead of straight-elongated ones found in the wild type. The epicuticular nanoridge structures are absent in many abaxial epidermal cells of fop2 petals, and surgical or genetic generation of space in young fop2 buds restores the straight elongation of petals, suggesting that the physical contact of sepals and petals causes the petal folding. Similar petal folding has been reported in the fop1 mutant, and the petals of fop2 fop1 double mutants resemble those of both the fop1 and fop2 single mutants, although the epidermal structure and permeability of the petal surface is more affected in fop2. Our results suggest that synthesis and transport of cutin or wax in growing petals play an important role for their smooth elongation through the narrow spaces of floral buds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Reproductive Transition and Flower Development)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application
Plants 2014, 3(3), 304-323; doi:10.3390/plants3030304
Received: 17 April 2014 / Revised: 17 June 2014 / Accepted: 27 June 2014 / Published: 11 July 2014
PDF Full-text (790 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants’ developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try
[...] Read more.
Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants’ developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2–4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Reproductive Transition and Flower Development)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Plants Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
plants@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Plants
Back to Top