Special Issue "Waste Management Education and Promotion"

A special issue of Recycling (ISSN 2313-4321).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Christian Zurbrügg

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: solid waste management; urban development; urban upgrading; low-income settings
Guest Editor
Dr. Ian Williams

Centre for Environmental Science, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, UK
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Improving waste management by increasing recycling and resource recovery is part of the larger effort of protecting human and environmental health and of comprehensive resource management. However, waste management is not something that can be solved only by smart innovative, technology or engineering. Waste management relates closely to people through their behaviours, lifestyles and resource consumption patterns, which then impact on waste generation and waste practices. As this interaction among people—their participation and empowerment—are critical in all phases of waste service provision, “education and promotion” around waste issues plays a key role. It fosters social acceptance, behaviour change and even willingness to pay and thus provides the basis for a long-term solution for sustainable solid waste management. Besides public waste education and promotion, also developing capacity of skilled waste managers through education remains a challenge especially when considering the large deficits of waste management in low and middle-income countries. New education approaches and technologies open windows of opportunity. There are also now an increasing number of community-based organisations, non-government organisations, private institutions, and government bodies dedicated to waste education and promotion. Many of these have significant results and learnings from their programs.

This Special Issue of Recycling provides the opportunity to share new research insights comprising tools, case studies and impact studies of expert and public waste education and promotion.

Dr. Christian Zurbrügg
Dr. Ian Williams
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Recycling is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Public waste awareness
  • Capacity development
  • Teaching waste management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Households’ Perception of Financial Incentives in Endorsing Sustainable Waste Recycling in Nigeria
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 31 May 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
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Abstract
Recycling is viewed as a central aspect in sustainability and mainly as pro-environmental consumer behavior. The purpose of this study is to examine the perception of households on financial incentives in endorsing sustainable recycling for municipal solid waste in Nigeria. The study was
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Recycling is viewed as a central aspect in sustainability and mainly as pro-environmental consumer behavior. The purpose of this study is to examine the perception of households on financial incentives in endorsing sustainable recycling for municipal solid waste in Nigeria. The study was conducted in the Shomolu Local Government Area, Lagos State, Nigeria. The study also covers drivers for household willingness to recycle municipal solid waste on environmental risk, behavioral economics, resource value, economic benefit, convenience, knowledge, legislation, and belief. The result from the study asserts the hypothesis that financial incentives for recycling are vital for reducing and managing municipal solid waste sustainably. The most important driver for household willingness to recycle municipal solid waste is the detrimental environmental impacts. A moderate to positive relationship exists between households’ perception of financial incentives for recycling and drivers for household willingness to recycle municipal solid waste. The study recommends adopting the extended producer responsibility (EPR) model, reverse vending options, amongst other approaches, in an effort to promote recycling culture among citizens and residents in Nigeria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Management Education and Promotion)
Open AccessArticle Procedural Information and Behavioral Control: Longitudinal Analysis of the Intention-Behavior Gap in the Context of Recycling
Received: 3 December 2017 / Revised: 18 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 22 January 2018
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Abstract
The theory of planned behavior states that individuals act on their intentions, especially when they have behavioral control. The current study examines how seeking recycling-related procedural information—i.e., information about how and where to recycle—is related to behavioral control. Hypothesis testing used hierarchical ordinary
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The theory of planned behavior states that individuals act on their intentions, especially when they have behavioral control. The current study examines how seeking recycling-related procedural information—i.e., information about how and where to recycle—is related to behavioral control. Hypothesis testing used hierarchical ordinary least squares regression analysis of longitudinal data from 553 survey respondents. Results supported seven hypotheses. Most notably, procedural information seeking both mediated and moderated the relationship between intention and behavior. Further, the moderation effect was itself mediated by behavioral control. The argument for this mediated moderation is that information seeking enhances behavioral control, and it is primarily behavioral control that moderates the relationship between intention and behavior. These results have implications for the theory of planned behavior and, more generally, for how individuals use information to support their behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Management Education and Promotion)
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