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A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Dr. Peter Iver Kaufman

Jepson School, University of Richmond, Room 133, Jepson Hall, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 804-289-8003
Fax: +1 804 2876062
Interests: christian traditions: late antique, medieval and early modern European spirituality, politics and drama

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Members of the editorial board of RELIGIONS are a varied lot. Their areas of special scholarly interest stretch across the health sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities--as does the journal's interest. A collection of RELIGIONS special topics issues would demonstrate as much, but we will occasionally circulate a single issue that exhibits both the variety and the quality of our editors' work.

Peter Iver Kaufman
Editor-in-Chief

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Islam and Roman Catholicism as Transnational Political Phenomena: Notes for a Comparative Research Agenda
Religions 2011, 2(4), 536-548; doi:10.3390/rel2040536
Received: 9 August 2011 / Revised: 19 September 2011 / Accepted: 29 September 2011 / Published: 30 September 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we offer some preliminary insights into a comparison of Islam and Roman Catholicism as transnational or “transcivilizational” political phenomena. We note that both traditions are monotheistic, offer universalist theologies, and have played important political roles both historically and in contemporary
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In this paper, we offer some preliminary insights into a comparison of Islam and Roman Catholicism as transnational or “transcivilizational” political phenomena. We note that both traditions are monotheistic, offer universalist theologies, and have played important political roles both historically and in contemporary national and international politics. The comparison provides some additional insights into the role of ‘the sacred’ in politics at various levels, and presents the possibility of an intermediate level of analysis in comparative politics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Editors Issue)
Open AccessArticle Hamlet’s Religions
Religions 2011, 2(3), 427-448; doi:10.3390/rel2030427
Received: 6 June 2011 / Revised: 8 August 2011 / Accepted: 16 August 2011 / Published: 6 September 2011
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Abstract
Pastoral challenges prompted pietists among Elizabethan Catholics and Calvinists to commend what historians now call an inward turn whereby the faithful, in a sense, become their own confessors. This article suggests that spiritual exercises or soliloquies Shakespeare scripted for his Hamlet (and, less
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Pastoral challenges prompted pietists among Elizabethan Catholics and Calvinists to commend what historians now call an inward turn whereby the faithful, in a sense, become their own confessors. This article suggests that spiritual exercises or soliloquies Shakespeare scripted for his Hamlet (and, less so, for Angelo in Measure for Measure) compare favorably with the devotional literature that underscored the importance of self-analysis, intra-psychic conflict, and contrition. The argument here is not that the playwright’s piety resembled his Hamlet’s but that the latter reflected efforts to structure desire in the religions of the time struggling for survival and recognition. References to passages in Shakespeare plays (act, scene) appear parenthetically in the text. Unless otherwise indicated in the bibliography appended to this article, all early printed material is accessible at the Early English Books database, http://eebo.chadwyck.com/home, verified June 1, 2011. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Editors Issue)
Open AccessArticle A Political End to a Pioneering Career: Marianne Beth and the Psychology of Religion
Religions 2011, 2(3), 247-263; doi:10.3390/rel2030247
Received: 3 June 2011 / Revised: 23 June 2011 / Accepted: 5 July 2011 / Published: 6 July 2011
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Abstract
Although forgotten in both Religionswissenschaft (the Science of Religion) and psychology, Marianne Beth (1880-1984), initially trained as a lawyer and already in 1928 called a “leading European woman”, must be considered as one of the female pioneers of these fields. She has been
[...] Read more.
Although forgotten in both Religionswissenschaft (the Science of Religion) and psychology, Marianne Beth (1880-1984), initially trained as a lawyer and already in 1928 called a “leading European woman”, must be considered as one of the female pioneers of these fields. She has been active especially in the psychology of religion, a field in which she, together with her husband Karl Beth, founded a research institute, an international organization and a journal. In 1932, the Beths organized in Vienna (where Karl was a professor) the largest conference ever in the history of the psychology of religion. Because of her Jewish descent, Marianne Beth fled to the USA when Austria was annexed by Nazi Germany in 1938. This brought an abrupt end to her career as researcher and writer. The article reconstructs Marianne Beth’s path into psychology, analyzes some of her work and puts her achievements in an international perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Editors Issue)
Open AccessArticle Eastern Orthodox Christianity and the Uses of the Past in Contemporary Greece
Religions 2011, 2(2), 95-113; doi:10.3390/rel2020095
Received: 15 March 2011 / Revised: 12 April 2011 / Accepted: 4 May 2011 / Published: 11 May 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (396 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The article examines the use of Orthodox Christianity in the debates over the cultural heritage of contemporary Greece. Since the birth of modern Greece, Orthodox Christianity has been used as one of the foundational cultural markers for the construction of Modern Greek national
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The article examines the use of Orthodox Christianity in the debates over the cultural heritage of contemporary Greece. Since the birth of modern Greece, Orthodox Christianity has been used as one of the foundational cultural markers for the construction of Modern Greek national identity. This employment of religion is particularly evident in the case of history in its popularized format. In contemporary cultural politics, debates over the building of a mosque in Athens or the role of Orthodoxy in history textbooks offer particular illustrations of the public significance of Orthodox Christianity. This high profile role was particularly pronounced during the reign of the late Archbishop Christodoulos (1998–2008). The article suggests that the engagement and influence of the Church on public debates depends upon the nature of the affair: The Church enjoys more authority in ecclesiastical issues and is far less influential on issues of broader interest, such as geopolitical disputes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Editors Issue)

Review

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Open AccessReview Religion and Ethnicity: Theoretical Connections
Religions 2011, 2(3), 312-329; doi:10.3390/rel2030312
Received: 12 May 2011 / Revised: 30 June 2011 / Accepted: 22 July 2011 / Published: 26 July 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (236 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The religion literature in Sociology remains largely disconnected from the ethnicity and immigration literature despite enduring connections between religion and ethnicity. This review helps to close this gap. It shows how the dominant theories in each discipline follow a similar trajectory and examines
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The religion literature in Sociology remains largely disconnected from the ethnicity and immigration literature despite enduring connections between religion and ethnicity. This review helps to close this gap. It shows how the dominant theories in each discipline follow a similar trajectory and examines how exploring the theoretical connections between religion and ethnicity can advance our understanding of each social phenomenon. In particular, it can illuminate why America remains so religious as well as why America’s religious congregations continue to be so divided along ethnic and racial lines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Editors Issue)

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