E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Emerging Acoustic Wave-Based Sensors"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Fabien J. Josse (Website)

Microsensors Research Labs, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
Fax: +1 414 288 5579
Interests: liquid-phase sensors; chemical sensors; biosensors; MEMS-based bio-chemical sensors; sensor drift; sensor signal estimation and processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Acoustic wave-based sensors have been around for almost half a century but the field continues to produce exciting new developments, driven in part by (1) new demands and (2) increasing need for miniaturization. There are various types of acoustic wave devices and based on their design, they can be used to develop physical (e.g., torque or pressure) and bio-chemical (e.g., concentration and identification of analytes and bio-molecules, etc.) sensors. Furthermore, depending on their mode of operation, they can be applied in the gas phase (e.g., Rayleigh surface acoustic wave) or liquid phase (e.g., shear horizontally (SH) polarized acoustic wave). While acoustic wave-based sensors are being developed for numerous applications, research has continued in the field for improved and new devices to take advantage of their high sensitivity to both mechanical and electrical loadings perturbation. For example, acoustic wave-based sensors utilizing the thickness shear-mode resonator (TSMR) are still opening up new possibilities such as lateral field excited (LFE) acoustic wave sensors, and more recently, film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) sensors. These high sensitivity sensor platforms can all be miniaturized using MEMS fabrication techniques, and thus can be integrated on a chip together with the driving circuitry.

The sensitivity of acoustic wave devices to surface viscoelastic properties has also led to new developments in the field of bio-chemical sensors. One of the key challenges in the field of chemical sensors is specificity. A number of approaches, including (1) the development of systems combining acoustic and optical detection and (2) the use of acoustic wave-based sensor elements with various analyte specific coatings into a sensor array, have been used to address this challenge. Both physical and chemical sensors can also be operated in wireless or passive mode. This has permitted the development of remote sensing devices.

This special issue is intended to highlight current trends in acoustic wave-based sensor technology. Its purpose is to give an up-to-date overview and new developments in the field, but also to invite the reader to envision emerging developments and help define the future of this exciting technology.

Prof. Dr. Fabien J. Josse
Guest Editor

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Vibration Sensors
Sensors 2011, 11(12), 11809-11832; doi:10.3390/s111211809
Received: 5 November 2011 / Revised: 5 December 2011 / Accepted: 15 December 2011 / Published: 19 December 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (676 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of [...] Read more.
In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Acoustic Wave-Based Sensors)
Open AccessArticle Highly Mass-Sensitive Thin Film Plate Acoustic Resonators (FPAR)
Sensors 2011, 11(7), 6942-6953; doi:10.3390/s110706942
Received: 8 May 2011 / Revised: 8 June 2011 / Accepted: 28 June 2011 / Published: 4 July 2011
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (428 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated [...] Read more.
The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated with hexamethyl-disiloxane(HMDSO)-plasma-polymerized thin films of various thicknesses. Systematic data on frequency shift and insertion loss versus film thickness are presented. FPARs demonstrate high mass-loading sensitivity as well as good tolerance towards the HMDSO viscous losses. Initial measurements in gas phase environment are further presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Acoustic Wave-Based Sensors)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Sensors Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
sensors@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Sensors
Back to Top