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Special Issue "Delft Workshop 2008-2009—Sensors and Imagers: a VLSI Perspective"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Edoardo Charbon

Chair of VLSI Design, Department of Microelectronics, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands

Special Issue Information

Symposium:

Sensors and Sensor Networks: A VLSI Design Perspective
1 December 2008 - TU Delft
Fac. AE (L&R)
Collegezaal C
Kluyverweg 1
Delft, The Netherlands
http://cas.et.tudelft.nl/

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle SirT1—A Sensor for Monitoring Self-Renewal and Aging Process in Retinal Stem Cells
Sensors 2010, 10(6), 6172-6194; doi:10.3390/s100606172
Received: 8 January 2010 / Revised: 28 February 2010 / Accepted: 3 May 2010 / Published: 21 June 2010
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (763 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Retinal stem cells bear potency of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into many retinal cells. Utilizing appropriate sensors one can effectively detect the self-renewal and aging process abilities. Silencing information regulator (SirT1), a member of the sirtuin family, is a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase [...] Read more.
Retinal stem cells bear potency of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into many retinal cells. Utilizing appropriate sensors one can effectively detect the self-renewal and aging process abilities. Silencing information regulator (SirT1), a member of the sirtuin family, is a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase and an essential mediator for longevity in normal cells by calorie restriction. We firstly investigate the SirT1 mRNA expression in retinal stem cells from rats and 19 human eyes of different ages. Results revealed that SirT1 expression was significantly decreased in in vivo aged eyes, associated with poor self-renewal abilities. Additionally, SirT1 mRNA levels were dose-dependently increased in resveratrol- treated retinal stem cells. The expression of SirT1 on oxidative stress-induced damage was significantly decreased, negatively correlated with the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with resveratrol could effectively further reduce oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment in retinal stem cells. Importantly, the anti-oxidant effects of resveratrol in H2O2-treated retinal stem cells were significantly abolished by knockdown of SirT1 expression (sh-SirT1). SirT1 expression provides a feasible sensor in assessing self-renewal and aging process in retinal stem cells. Resveratrol can prevent reactive oxygen species-induced damages via increased retinal SirT1 expression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delft Workshop 2008-2009—Sensors and Imagers: a VLSI Perspective)
Open AccessArticle Ultra-High-Speed Image Signal Accumulation Sensor
Sensors 2010, 10(4), 4100-4113; doi:10.3390/s100404100
Received: 24 March 2010 / Revised: 8 April 2010 / Accepted: 16 April 2010 / Published: 23 April 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1901 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Averaging of accumulated data is a standard technique applied to processing data with low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), such as image signals captured in ultra-high-speed imaging. The authors propose an architecture layout of an ultra-high-speed image sensor capable of on-chip signal accumulation. The [...] Read more.
Averaging of accumulated data is a standard technique applied to processing data with low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), such as image signals captured in ultra-high-speed imaging. The authors propose an architecture layout of an ultra-high-speed image sensor capable of on-chip signal accumulation. The very high frame rate is enabled by employing an image sensor structure with a multi-folded CCD in each pixel, which serves as an in situ image signal storage. The signal accumulation function is achieved by direct connection of the first and the last storage elements of the in situ storage CCD. It has been thought that the multi-folding is achievable only by driving electrodes with complicated and impractical layouts. Simple configurations of the driving electrodes to overcome the difficulty are presented for two-phase and four-phase transfer CCD systems. The in situ storage image sensor with the signal accumulation function is named Image Signal Accumulation Sensor (ISAS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delft Workshop 2008-2009—Sensors and Imagers: a VLSI Perspective)
Figures

Open AccessArticle A CMOS Time-Resolved Fluorescence Lifetime Analysis Micro-System
Sensors 2009, 9(11), 9255-9274; doi:10.3390/s91109255
Received: 2 September 2009 / Revised: 25 September 2009 / Accepted: 13 November 2009 / Published: 18 November 2009
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (3709 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We describe a CMOS-based micro-system for time-resolved fluorescence lifetime analysis. It comprises a 16 × 4 array of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) fabricated in 0.35 μm high-voltage CMOS technology with in-pixel time-gated photon counting circuitry and a second device incorporating an 8 [...] Read more.
We describe a CMOS-based micro-system for time-resolved fluorescence lifetime analysis. It comprises a 16 × 4 array of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) fabricated in 0.35 μm high-voltage CMOS technology with in-pixel time-gated photon counting circuitry and a second device incorporating an 8 × 8 AlInGaN blue micro-pixellated light-emitting diode (micro-LED) array bump-bonded to an equivalent array of LED drivers realized in a standard low-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology, capable of producing excitation pulses with a width of 777 ps (FWHM). This system replaces instrumentation based on lasers, photomultiplier tubes, bulk optics and discrete electronics with a PC-based micro-system. Demonstrator lifetime measurements of colloidal quantum dot and Rhodamine samples are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delft Workshop 2008-2009—Sensors and Imagers: a VLSI Perspective)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography: Design and Applications
Sensors 2010, 10(3), 1890-1917; doi:10.3390/s100301890
Received: 15 January 2010 / Revised: 10 February 2010 / Accepted: 28 February 2010 / Published: 9 March 2010
Cited by 62 | PDF Full-text (1165 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article reports recent advances and progress in the field of electrical capacitance volume tomography (ECVT). ECVT, developed from the two-dimensional electrical capacitance tomography (ECT), is a promising non-intrusive imaging technology that can provide real-time three-dimensional images of the sensing domain. Images [...] Read more.
This article reports recent advances and progress in the field of electrical capacitance volume tomography (ECVT). ECVT, developed from the two-dimensional electrical capacitance tomography (ECT), is a promising non-intrusive imaging technology that can provide real-time three-dimensional images of the sensing domain. Images are reconstructed from capacitance measurements acquired by electrodes placed on the outside boundary of the testing vessel. In this article, a review of progress on capacitance sensor design and applications to multi-phase flows is presented. The sensor shape, electrode configuration, and the number of electrodes that comprise three key elements of three-dimensional capacitance sensors are illustrated. The article also highlights applications of ECVT sensors on vessels of various sizes from 1 to 60 inches with complex geometries. Case studies are used to show the capability and validity of ECVT. The studies provide qualitative and quantitative real-time three-dimensional information of the measuring domain under study. Advantages of ECVT render it a favorable tool to be utilized for industrial applications and fundamental multi-phase flow research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delft Workshop 2008-2009—Sensors and Imagers: a VLSI Perspective)
Figures

Open AccessReview Nano-Bio-Technology and Sensing Chips: New Systems for Detection in Personalized Therapies and Cell Biology
Sensors 2010, 10(1), 526-543; doi:10.3390/s100100526
Received: 24 November 2009 / Revised: 30 December 2009 / Accepted: 5 January 2010 / Published: 12 January 2010
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (525 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Further advances in molecular medicine and cell biology also require new electrochemical systems to detect disease biomarkers and therapeutic compounds. Microelectronic technology offers powerful circuits and systems to develop innovative and miniaturized biochips for sensing at the molecular level. However, microelectronic biochips [...] Read more.
Further advances in molecular medicine and cell biology also require new electrochemical systems to detect disease biomarkers and therapeutic compounds. Microelectronic technology offers powerful circuits and systems to develop innovative and miniaturized biochips for sensing at the molecular level. However, microelectronic biochips proposed in the literature often do not show the right specificity, sensitivity, and reliability required by biomedical applications. Nanotechnology offers new materials and solutions to improve the surface properties of sensing probes. The aim of the present paper is to review the most recent progress in Nano-Bio-Technology in the area of the development of new electrochemical systems for molecular detection in personalized therapy and cell culture monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delft Workshop 2008-2009—Sensors and Imagers: a VLSI Perspective)

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