Special Issue "Exemplars in Social Research"

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A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Dr. Madine VanderPlaat

Department of Sociology & Criminology, 923 Robie St., Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-902-496-8289
Interests: Immigrant women, children and families; social exclusion; health equity; citizen participation; feminist methodologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this special issue of Societies we feature some examples of the outstanding articles you can expect to find in this journal.  Our authors, all of whom serve on our editorial board,  represent a diverse range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences and bring varied and challenging perspectives to our understanding of the social realm.  They are among the world's leading scholars in their respective fields and their work exemplifies excellence in research on human societies.

Prof. Dr. Madine VanderPlaat
Editor-in-Chief

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Conflict or Concert? Extending the Simmelian Triad to Account for Positive Third Party Presence in Face-to-Face Interviews with People Living with Parkinson’s Disease
Societies 2012, 2(3), 210-221; doi:10.3390/soc2030210
Received: 29 June 2012 / Revised: 4 September 2012 / Accepted: 6 September 2012 / Published: 17 September 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (248 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A number of sociologists and other researchers have focused on the role of third parties since Simmel’s seminal conceptualization of the social organization of the triad. However, less attention has been given to third party presence in qualitative interviews, despite the fact that
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A number of sociologists and other researchers have focused on the role of third parties since Simmel’s seminal conceptualization of the social organization of the triad. However, less attention has been given to third party presence in qualitative interviews, despite the fact that third party participation in interviews with people with chronic illness and/or disability occurs frequently. Here too it is assumed that third party presence promotes conflict, ignoring the role of third parties as facilitators who enable informants to articulate their perspectives. Therefore, I focus on Simmel’s concept of the triad, concluding that the role of facilitator must be added to the types he describes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exemplars in Social Research)
Open AccessArticle Child Murder in Nazi Germany: The Memory of Nazi Medical Crimes and Commemoration of “Children’s Euthanasia” Victims at Two Facilities (Eichberg, Kalmenhof)
Societies 2012, 2(3), 157-194; doi:10.3390/soc2030157
Received: 4 June 2012 / Revised: 14 August 2012 / Accepted: 20 August 2012 / Published: 12 September 2012
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Abstract
Nazi Germany’s “children’s euthanasia” was a unique program in the history of mankind, seeking to realize a social Darwinist vision of a society by means of the systematic murder of disabled children and youths. Perpetrators extinguished “unworthy life” during childhood and adolescence by
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Nazi Germany’s “children’s euthanasia” was a unique program in the history of mankind, seeking to realize a social Darwinist vision of a society by means of the systematic murder of disabled children and youths. Perpetrators extinguished “unworthy life” during childhood and adolescence by establishing killing stations, misleadingly labeled Kinderfachabteilungen (“special children’s wards”), in existing medical or other care facilities. Part of a research project on Nazi “euthanasia” crimes and their victims, this paper uses a comparative historical perspective to trace memories of the crimes and the memorialization of their victims at the sites of two of these wards (Eichberg and Kalmenhof in Hesse, Germany). It also discusses the implications of the findings for theorizing mnemonic practices and analyzing ways in which memorials and other sites of memory deal with past trauma and atrocity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exemplars in Social Research)
Open AccessArticle Debating "the Social": Towards a Critique of Sociological Nostalgia
Societies 2012, 2(1), 14-26; doi:10.3390/soc2010014
Received: 8 December 2011 / Revised: 2 March 2012 / Accepted: 13 March 2012 / Published: 22 March 2012
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Abstract
Although sociology can be commonsensically and parsimoniously defined as the study of society, the problems of defining such terms as ‘society’, ‘the social’, and ‘the social system’ remain an ongoing irritant of sociological theory. In addition to these traditional conceptual problems, there is
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Although sociology can be commonsensically and parsimoniously defined as the study of society, the problems of defining such terms as ‘society’, ‘the social’, and ‘the social system’ remain an ongoing irritant of sociological theory. In addition to these traditional conceptual problems, there is currently a strong sense that ‘society’ as an empirical reality and ‘society’ as a concept are in crisis. Given the contemporary view of ‘the end of the social’ there is also manifestly a potent and nostalgic interest in the past as a time of comforting solidarity and meaningfulness. To clarify this debate, we start by making a distinction between three approaches to society, namely structure, solidarity and creation. Nostalgia hinges around the certainties that followed from reliable social structures, and from the comfort of community. We illustrate these forms of nostalgia through an examination of the social philosophy of Alasdair MacIntyre. Recognizing that his criticisms of the loss of virtue represent a powerful indictment of modernity, we argue that past societies were also fractured by moral discord. More importantly, MacIntyre rules out the possibility of moral re-invention by excluding the rise of human rights as a moral framework. In conclusion, the forms of social creativity may not enjoy the ‘sticky’ solidarity of the past, but they do testify Georg Simmel’s idea of the social (Vergesellschaftung). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exemplars in Social Research)

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