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Special Issue "Symmetries of Electronic Order"

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A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Sergey Borisenko

Institute for Solid State Research, IFW-Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069, Dresden, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +49 351 4659566
Fax: +49 351 4659313
Interests: unconventional superconductivity; strongly correlated electron systems; angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As we know, the symmetry of the electronic charge distribution in solids closely follows that of the crystal lattice. Depending on temperature or other factors this symmetry can be broken as a result of self-organisation of the valence electrons. Examples include superconductivity, density waves, orbital ordering, quantum magnetism or colossal magneto-resistance. A central challenge in modern condensed matter physics is to understand such many-body systems and identify the strong interactions which lead to these ordering phenomena.

The most concise and informative characteristic of the electronic order and its symmetry is the Fermi surface, a surface in reciprocal space confining the occupied electronic states. The notion of the Fermi surface developed in quantum physics made it possible to explain many physical properties of metals: their ability to conduct electric current and heat, their ductility, shininess etc. Detailed understanding of the Fermi surface and supporting low-energy electronic structure of the systems exhibiting different ordering phenomena will certainly help to unravel the underlying mechanisms of quantum electronic order and show the roots to synthesis of functional materials with desired physical properties.

Novel experimental methods, such as angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, offer a direct access to the Fermi surface and low-energy electronic structure of solids. On the other hand, the Fermi surface and electronic dispersion can also be calculated from the first principles. Using both tools, it became possible to characterize what is required most for complete understanding of particular type of the quantum electronic order - the symmetry and strength of the interactions which finally define the physical properties in those systems.

Contributions are invited on both experimental and theoretical studies of low-energy electronic structure of solids with emphasis on the Fermi surface. Possible classes of materials include, but not limited to:

  • superconductors,
  • spin density waves compounds,
  • charge density waves compounds,
  • orbitally ordered systems,
  • topological insulators,
  • carbon-based materials,
  • nano-structures

Dr. Sergey Borisenko
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • fermi surface
  • photoemission spectroscopy
  • spectral function
  • ab-initio calculations
  • electronic structure

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Fermi Surface Reconstruction due to Hidden Rotating Antiferromagnetism in N and P-Type High-TC Cuprates
Symmetry 2013, 5(2), 215-232; doi:10.3390/sym5020215
Received: 13 December 2012 / Revised: 17 April 2013 / Accepted: 18 April 2013 / Published: 7 May 2013
PDF Full-text (2284 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Fermi surface calculated within the rotating antiferromagnetism theory undergoes a topological change when doping changes from p-type to n-type, in qualitative agreement with experimental data for n-type cuprate Nd2−xCexCuO4 and p-type La2−xSrxCuO4. Also, the reconstruction of the Fermi surface, observed experimentally close
[...] Read more.
The Fermi surface calculated within the rotating antiferromagnetism theory undergoes a topological change when doping changes from p-type to n-type, in qualitative agreement with experimental data for n-type cuprate Nd2−xCexCuO4 and p-type La2−xSrxCuO4. Also, the reconstruction of the Fermi surface, observed experimentally close to optimal doping in p-type cuprates, and slightly higher than optimal doping in the overdoped regime for this n-type high-TC cuprate, is well accounted for in this theory. This reconstruction is a consequence of the quantum criticality caused by the disappearance of rotating antiferromagnetism. The present results are in qualitative agreement with recently observed quantum oscillations in some high-TC cuprates. This paper presents new results about the application of the rotating antiferromagnetism theory to the study of the electronic structure for n-type materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symmetries of Electronic Order)
Open AccessArticle One-Sign Order Parameter in Iron Based Superconductor
Symmetry 2012, 4(1), 251-264; doi:10.3390/sym4010251
Received: 2 March 2012 / Revised: 14 March 2012 / Accepted: 16 March 2012 / Published: 21 March 2012
Cited by 74 | PDF Full-text (2311 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The onset of superconductivity at the transition temperature is marked by the onset of order, which is characterized by an energy gap. Most models of the iron-based superconductors find a sign-changing (s±) order parameter [1–6], with the physical implication that pairing is driven
[...] Read more.
The onset of superconductivity at the transition temperature is marked by the onset of order, which is characterized by an energy gap. Most models of the iron-based superconductors find a sign-changing (s±) order parameter [1–6], with the physical implication that pairing is driven by spin fluctuations. Recent work, however, has indicated that LiFeAs has a simple isotropic order parameter [7–9] and spin fluctuations are not necessary [7,10], contrary to the models [1–6]. The strength of the spin fluctuations has been controversial [11,12], meaning that the mechanism of superconductivity cannot as yet be determined. We report the momentum dependence of the superconducting energy gap, where we find an anisotropy that rules out coupling through spin fluctuations and the sign change. The results instead suggest that orbital fluctuations assisted by phonons [13,14] are the best explanation for superconductivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symmetries of Electronic Order)
Figures

Open AccessArticle An Application of the Extended Global SO(3) × SO(3) × U(1) Symmetry of the Hubbard Model on a Square Lattice: The Spinon, η-Spinon, and c Fermion Description
Symmetry 2011, 3(4), 780-827; doi:10.3390/sym3040780
Received: 17 October 2011 / Revised: 24 November 2011 / Accepted: 30 November 2011 / Published: 12 December 2011
PDF Full-text (582 KB)
Abstract
In this paper we review recent results on the preliminary applications of the new-found extended global SO(3) × SO(3) × U(1) symmetry of the Hubbard model on a bipartite lattice. Our results refer to the particular case of the bipartite square lattice. Specifically,
[...] Read more.
In this paper we review recent results on the preliminary applications of the new-found extended global SO(3) × SO(3) × U(1) symmetry of the Hubbard model on a bipartite lattice. Our results refer to the particular case of the bipartite square lattice. Specifically, we review a general description for such a model with nearest-neighbor transfer integral t and on-site repulsion U on a square lattice with N2a 1 sites consistent with its extended global symmetry. It refers to three types of elementary objects whose occupancy configurations generate the state representations of the model extended global symmetry. Such objects emerge from a suitable electron-rotated-electron unitary transformation. An application to the spin spectrum of the parent compound La2CuO4 is shortly reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symmetries of Electronic Order)
Open AccessArticle d-Wave Superconductivity and s-Wave Charge Density Waves: Coexistence between Order Parameters of Different Origin and Symmetry
Symmetry 2011, 3(4), 699-749; doi:10.3390/sym3040699
Received: 26 May 2011 / Revised: 8 October 2011 / Accepted: 11 October 2011 / Published: 20 October 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (2379 KB)
Abstract
A review of the theory describing the coexistence between d-wave superconductivity and s-wave charge-density-waves (CDWs) is presented. The CDW gapping is identified with pseudogapping observed in high-Tc oxides. According to the cuprate specificity, the analysis is carried out for the
[...] Read more.
A review of the theory describing the coexistence between d-wave superconductivity and s-wave charge-density-waves (CDWs) is presented. The CDW gapping is identified with pseudogapping observed in high-Tc oxides. According to the cuprate specificity, the analysis is carried out for the two-dimensional geometry of the Fermi surface (FS). Phase diagrams on the σ0 − α plane—here, σ0 is the ratio between the energy gaps in the parent pure CDW and superconducting states, and the quantity 2α is connected with the degree of dielectric (CDW) FS gapping—were obtained for various possible configurations of the order parameters in the momentum space. Relevant tunnel and photoemission experimental data for high-Tc oxides are compared with theoretical predictions. A brief review of the results obtained earlier for the coexistence between s-wave superconductivity and CDWs is also given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symmetries of Electronic Order)
Open AccessArticle Symmetry Aspects of the Band Structure and Motion Equations Applied in Calculating the Cyclotron Frequency of Electrons in Metals
Symmetry 2011, 3(3), 541-563; doi:10.3390/sym3030541
Received: 21 July 2011 / Accepted: 1 August 2011 / Published: 10 August 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (414 KB)
Abstract
Cyclotron frequency of a crystal electron is, in general, not an easily accessible parameter. Nevertheless, its calculation can be simplified when the symmetry properties of the band structure and those of the motion equations in the magnetic field are simultaneously taken into account.
[...] Read more.
Cyclotron frequency of a crystal electron is, in general, not an easily accessible parameter. Nevertheless, its calculation can be simplified when the symmetry properties of the band structure and those of the motion equations in the magnetic field are simultaneously taken into account. In effect, a combined symmetry of the electron Hamiltonian and that of the Lorentz equation provide us with a non-linear oscillator problem of high symmetry. In the next step, the kinetic energy of the oscillator can be separated from the whole of electron energy and applied in a new kind of calculation of the cyclotron frequency which is much more simple than before. In consequence, a detailed approach to the electron circulation, also in more complex band structures, becomes a relatively easy task. For different crystal lattices of cubic symmetry taken as examples the cyclotron frequency of the present and a former method are compared numerically giving the same results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symmetries of Electronic Order)

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