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Topical Collection "Freshwater HABs and Health in a Changing World"

A topical collection in Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This collection belongs to the section "Marine and Freshwater Toxins".

Editors

Collection Editor
Dr. Lesley V. D'Anglada

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. (MC 4304T), Washington, DC 20460, USA
E-Mail
Phone: +1 202 566 1125
Fax: +1 202 566 1140
Collection Editor
Dr. Elizabeth D. Hilborn

United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27703, USA
E-Mail
Fax: +1 919 966 0655
Collection Editor
Dr. Lorraine C. Backer

National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, MS F-60, Chamblee, GA 30341, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 770 488 3450

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Public Health: Progress and Current Challenges included research papers and reviews on various aspects of HABs and public health, including HAB occurrence, human health risk assessment, water treatment techniques, and regulatory guideline development. This Special Issue touched on a number of topics that need further exploration, including characterizing cyanobacterial toxin poisonings associated with drinking contaminated water or eating contaminated food, HAB-related illnesses from exposures during recreational water activities, and understanding cyanobacteria bloom-associated fish kills and poisonings of companion animals, livestock, and wildlife. This Topical Collection entitled Freshwater HABs and Health in a Changing World serves as a forum to further discuss these topics and address challenges in assessing freshwater HAB-associated effects on public health and the environment. Manuscripts are invited that provide information about exposure assessment; health outcomes; outbreak investigations; wild and domestic animal poisonings; toxicology of cyanobacterial toxins in animals and humans, and the production of toxins in the environment. Manuscripts on the absorption, distribution, and elimination of toxins in animals and humans, and the control of toxins in the built and natural environment, as well as related topics are also invited.

Dr. Lesley V. D'Anglada
Dr. Elizabeth Hilborn
Dr. Lorraine C. Backer
Collection Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • harmful algal blooms
  • cyanobacteria
  • blue-green algae
  • cyanotoxins
  • red tides
  • public health
  • drinking water treatment
  • monitoring
  • treatment
  • prevention
  • public health surveillance
  • environmental health
  • environmental contaminants and human health

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

2017

Jump to: 2016

Open AccessArticle Eutrophication and Warming Boost Cyanobacterial Biomass and Microcystins
Toxins 2017, 9(2), 64; doi:10.3390/toxins9020064
Received: 26 December 2016 / Revised: 2 February 2017 / Accepted: 9 February 2017 / Published: 11 February 2017
PDF Full-text (2174 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Eutrophication and warming are key drivers of cyanobacterial blooms, but their combined effects on microcystin (MC) concentrations are less studied. We tested the hypothesis that warming promotes cyanobacterial abundance in a natural plankton community and that eutrophication enhances cyanobacterial biomass and MC concentrations.
[...] Read more.
Eutrophication and warming are key drivers of cyanobacterial blooms, but their combined effects on microcystin (MC) concentrations are less studied. We tested the hypothesis that warming promotes cyanobacterial abundance in a natural plankton community and that eutrophication enhances cyanobacterial biomass and MC concentrations. We incubated natural seston from a eutrophic pond under normal, high, and extreme temperatures (i.e., 20, 25, and 30 °C) with and without additional nutrients added (eutrophication) mimicking a pulse as could be expected from projected summer storms under climate change. Eutrophication increased algal- and cyanobacterial biomass by 26 and 8 times, respectively, and led to 24 times higher MC concentrations. This effect was augmented with higher temperatures leading to 45 times higher MC concentrations at 25 °C, with 11 times more cyanobacterial chlorophyll-a and 25 times more eukaryote algal chlorophyll-a. At 30 °C, MC concentrations were 42 times higher, with cyanobacterial chlorophyll-a being 17 times and eukaryote algal chlorophyll-a being 24 times higher. In contrast, warming alone did not yield more cyanobacteria or MCs, because the in situ community had already depleted the available nutrient pool. MC per potential MC producing cell declined at higher temperatures under nutrient enrichments, which was confirmed by a controlled experiment with two laboratory strains of Microcystis aeruginosa. Nevertheless, MC concentrations were much higher at the increased temperature and nutrient treatment than under warming alone due to strongly promoted biomass, lifting N-imitation and promotion of potential MC producers like Microcystis. This study exemplifies the vulnerability of eutrophic urban waters to predicted future summer climate change effects that might aggravate cyanobacterial nuisance. Full article
Figures

2016

Jump to: 2017

Open AccessArticle miR-541 Contributes to Microcystin-LR-Induced Reproductive Toxicity through Regulating the Expression of p15 in Mice
Toxins 2016, 8(9), 260; doi:10.3390/toxins8090260
Received: 19 June 2016 / Accepted: 31 August 2016 / Published: 6 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8372 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Microcystin-leucine arginine (MC-LR) is a harmful cyanotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. MC-LR can exert endocrine-disrupting activities in many organisms. We have previously demonstrated that MC-LR exerts both acute and chronic reproductive toxicity in male mice, resulting in a decline in sperm quality and damage
[...] Read more.
Microcystin-leucine arginine (MC-LR) is a harmful cyanotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. MC-LR can exert endocrine-disrupting activities in many organisms. We have previously demonstrated that MC-LR exerts both acute and chronic reproductive toxicity in male mice, resulting in a decline in sperm quality and damage to testicular structure. Moreover, we also observed extensive alterations in a panel of microRNAs in spermatogonial cells after exposure to MC-LR. In this study, we have confirmed that miR-541 was significantly increased both in GC-1 cells (in vitro) and in mouse testes (in vivo) after exposure to MC-LR. Our data support that p15 was the target gene of miR-541. Increase in miR-541 led to a reduction of p15 and murine double minute2 (MDM2), promoting the activation of p53 signaling and MC-LR-mediated cell apoptosis. Moreover, cells responded to MC-LR with reduced viability and increased apoptosis. Consistently, inhibiting miR-541 could upregulate the expression of p15 and MDM2, resulting in the downregulation of phospho-p53. Downregulation of miR-541 promoted cell viability by reducing MC-LR-induced cell apoptosis. In conclusion, we demonstrate here a crucial role for miR-541 in MC-LR-induced toxic effects on the reproductive system, in an attempt to provide a rational strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of MC-LR-induced impairment in the reproductive system. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Development of Toxicological Risk Assessment Models for Acute and Chronic Exposure to Pollutants
Toxins 2016, 8(9), 251; doi:10.3390/toxins8090251
Received: 17 June 2016 / Revised: 24 August 2016 / Accepted: 25 August 2016 / Published: 31 August 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1254 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Alert level frameworks advise agencies on a sequence of monitoring and management actions, and are implemented so as to reduce the risk of the public coming into contact with hazardous substances. Their effectiveness relies on the detection of the hazard, but with many
[...] Read more.
Alert level frameworks advise agencies on a sequence of monitoring and management actions, and are implemented so as to reduce the risk of the public coming into contact with hazardous substances. Their effectiveness relies on the detection of the hazard, but with many systems not receiving any regular monitoring, pollution events often go undetected. We developed toxicological risk assessment models for acute and chronic exposure to pollutants that incorporate the probabilities that the public will come into contact with undetected pollution events, to identify the level of risk a system poses in regards to the pollutant. As a proof of concept, we successfully demonstrated that the models could be applied to determine probabilities of acute and chronic illness types related to recreational activities in waterbodies containing cyanotoxins. Using the acute model, we identified lakes that present a ‘high’ risk to develop Day Away From Work illness, and lakes that present a ‘low’ or ‘medium’ risk to develop First Aid Cases when used for swimming. The developed risk models succeeded in categorising lakes according to their risk level to the public in an objective way. Modelling by how much the probability of public exposure has to decrease to lower the risks to acceptable levels will enable authorities to identify suitable control measures and monitoring strategies. We suggest broadening the application of these models to other contaminants. Full article
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