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Special Issue "Bacteriophage Assembly"

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A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Hans-Wolfgang Ackermann (Website)

Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, QC, G1K 7P4, Canada
Fax: +1 418 656 7898
Interests: emphasis on electron microscopy; classification; evolution; environment and virus taxonomy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Proposed Ancestors of Phage Nucleic Acid Packaging Motors (and Cells)
Viruses 2011, 3(7), 1249-1280; doi:10.3390/v3071249
Received: 4 June 2011 / Revised: 7 July 2011 / Accepted: 12 July 2011 / Published: 20 July 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (878 KB)
Abstract
I present a hypothesis that begins with the proposal that abiotic ancestors of phage RNA and DNA packaging systems (and cells) include mobile shells with an internal, molecule-transporting cavity. The foundations of this hypothesis include the conjecture that current nucleic acid packaging [...] Read more.
I present a hypothesis that begins with the proposal that abiotic ancestors of phage RNA and DNA packaging systems (and cells) include mobile shells with an internal, molecule-transporting cavity. The foundations of this hypothesis include the conjecture that current nucleic acid packaging systems have imprints from abiotic ancestors. The abiotic shells (1) initially imbibe and later also bind and transport organic molecules, thereby providing a means for producing molecular interactions that are links in the chain of events that produces ancestors to the first molecules that are both information carrying and enzymatically active, and (2) are subsequently scaffolds on which proteins assemble to form ancestors common to both shells of viral capsids and cell membranes. Emergence of cells occurs via aggregation and merger of shells and internal contents. The hypothesis continues by using proposed imprints of abiotic and biotic ancestors to deduce an ancestral thermal ratchet-based DNA packaging motor that subsequently evolves to integrate a DNA packaging ATPase that provides a power stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacteriophage Assembly)
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Open AccessArticle A Hypothesis for Bacteriophage DNA Packaging Motors
Viruses 2010, 2(9), 1821-1843; doi:10.3390/v2091821
Received: 4 June 2010 / Revised: 12 August 2010 / Accepted: 18 August 2010 / Published: 26 August 2010
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (378 KB)
Abstract
The hypothesis is presented that bacteriophage DNA packaging motors have a cycle comprised of bind/release thermal ratcheting with release-associated DNA pushing via ATP-dependent protein folding. The proposed protein folding occurs in crystallographically observed peptide segments that project into an axial channel of [...] Read more.
The hypothesis is presented that bacteriophage DNA packaging motors have a cycle comprised of bind/release thermal ratcheting with release-associated DNA pushing via ATP-dependent protein folding. The proposed protein folding occurs in crystallographically observed peptide segments that project into an axial channel of a protein 12-mer (connector) that serves, together with a coaxial ATPase multimer, as the entry portal. The proposed cycle begins when reverse thermal motion causes the connector’s peptide segments to signal the ATPase multimer to bind both ATP and the DNA molecule, thereby producing a dwell phase recently demonstrated by single-molecule procedures. The connector-associated peptide segments activate by transfer of energy from ATP during the dwell. The proposed function of connector/ATPase symmetry mismatches is to reduce thermal noise-induced signaling errors. After a dwell, ATP is cleaved and the DNA molecule released. The activated peptide segments push the released DNA molecule, thereby producing a burst phase recently shown to consist of four mini-bursts. The constraint of four mini-bursts is met by proposing that each mini-burst occurs via pushing by three of the 12 subunits of the connector. If all four mini-bursts occur, the cycle repeats. If the mini-bursts are not completed, a second cycle is superimposed on the first cycle. The existence of the second cycle is based on data recently obtained with bacteriophage T3. When both cycles stall, energy is diverted to expose the DNA molecule to maturation cleavage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacteriophage Assembly)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Bacteriophage Assembly
Viruses 2011, 3(3), 172-203; doi:10.3390/v3030172
Received: 5 January 2011 / Revised: 9 February 2011 / Accepted: 14 February 2011 / Published: 25 February 2011
Cited by 28 | PDF Full-text (1101 KB)
Abstract
Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of [...] Read more.
Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacteriophage Assembly)

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