Next Issue

E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Table of Contents

Sensors, Volume 2, Issue 1 (January 2002), Pages 1-40

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Detection of Antioxidative Activity of Plant Extracts at the DNA-Modified Screen-Printed Electrode
Sensors 2002, 2(1), 1-10; doi:10.3390/s20100001
Received: 12 October 2001 / Accepted: 26 October 2001 / Published: 15 January 2002
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (140 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A simple procedure for the voltammetric detection of antioxidative activity of plant extracts based on the protection from DNA damage at the electrode surface is reported. A disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor fabricated as a carbon-based screen-printed electrode modified by a surface layer of
[...] Read more.
A simple procedure for the voltammetric detection of antioxidative activity of plant extracts based on the protection from DNA damage at the electrode surface is reported. A disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor fabricated as a carbon-based screen-printed electrode modified by a surface layer of the calf thymus double stranded (ds) DNA was used as a working electrode in combination with a silver/silver chloride reference electrode and a separate platinum auxiliary electrode. The [Co(phen)3]3+ ion served as the dsDNA redox marker and the [Fe(EDTA)]- complex with hydrogen peroxide under the electrochemical reduction of the iron atom were used as the DNA cleavage mixture. A remarkable antioxidative activity of phenolic antioxidants such as rosmarinic and caffeic acids as standards and the extracts of lemon balm, oregano, thyme and agrimony was found which is quite in agreement with an antiradical activity determined spectrophotometrically using 2,2’-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. Full article
Open AccessArticle A (Bio-)Chemical Field-Effect Sensor with Macroporous Si as Substrate Material and a SiO2 / LPCVD-Si3N4 Double Layer as pH Transducer
Sensors 2002, 2(1), 11-22; doi:10.3390/s20100011
Received: 29 November 2001 / Accepted: 19 December 2001 / Published: 15 January 2002
Cited by 25 | PDF Full-text (1101 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Macroporous silicon has been etched from n-type Si, using a vertical etching cell where no rear side contact on the silicon wafer is necessary. The resulting macropores have been characterised by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). After etching, SiO2 was thermally
[...] Read more.
Macroporous silicon has been etched from n-type Si, using a vertical etching cell where no rear side contact on the silicon wafer is necessary. The resulting macropores have been characterised by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). After etching, SiO2 was thermally grown on the top of the porous silicon as an insulating layer and Si3N4 was deposited by means of Low Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition (LPCVD) as transducer material to fabricate a capacitive pH sensor. In order to prepare porous biosensors, the enzyme penicillinase has been additionally immobilised inside the porous structure. Electrochemical measurements of the pH sensor and the biosensor with an Electrolyte/Insulator/Semiconductor (EIS) structure have been performed in the Capacitance/Voltage (C/V) and Constant capacitance (ConCap) mode. Full article
Open AccessArticle In-Situ Chemiresistor Sensor Package for Real-Time Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds in Soil and Groundwater
Sensors 2002, 2(1), 23-34; doi:10.3390/s20100023
Received: 14 December 2001 / Accepted: 10 January 2002 / Published: 30 January 2002
Cited by 39 | PDF Full-text (1010 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents the development of a real-time microsensor-based monitoring system that can be used to detect and characterize volatile organic compounds in soil and groundwater. The system employs an array of polymer-based microsensors (chemiresistors) packaged in a waterproof housing that is designed
[...] Read more.
This paper presents the development of a real-time microsensor-based monitoring system that can be used to detect and characterize volatile organic compounds in soil and groundwater. The system employs an array of polymer-based microsensors (chemiresistors) packaged in a waterproof housing that is designed to protect the sensor from harsh subsurface environments, including completely water-saturated conditions. The sensors and packaging have been tested in field and laboratory environments, and characterization methods are being developed that utilize contaminant-transport models and time-dependent, in-situ sensor data to identify the location of the contaminant source. Full article
Open AccessArticle Surface Plasmon Resonance Studies on Molecular Imprinting
Sensors 2002, 2(1), 35-40; doi:10.3390/s20100035
Received: 3 December 2001 / Accepted: 17 January 2002 / Published: 19 January 2002
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (90 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) members were fabricated with the print molecule L-phenylalanine ethyl ester. The elution and adsorption procedures were investigated by surface plasmon resonance in situ. The changes of refractive angle during elution procedure suggest that the MIP is prepared on
[...] Read more.
The molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) members were fabricated with the print molecule L-phenylalanine ethyl ester. The elution and adsorption procedures were investigated by surface plasmon resonance in situ. The changes of refractive angle during elution procedure suggest that the MIP is prepared on the base of the non-covalent interactions. This MIP member sensor can achieve enantioselective recognition. Full article

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Sensors Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
sensors@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Sensors
Back to Top