Next Article in Journal
Body Burden of Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethene (DDE) and Childhood Pulmonary Function
Previous Article in Journal
Comprehensive Survey on Improved Focality and Penetration Depth of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Employing Multi-Coil Arrays
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1384; doi:10.3390/ijerph14111384

Comparison of Ground-Based and Satellite-Derived Solar UV Index Levels at Six South African Sites

1
LACy, Laboratoire de l’Atmosphère et des Cyclones (UMR 8105 CNRS, Université de La Réunion, Météo-France), Saint-Denis de La Réunion 97744, France
2
School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041, South Africa
3
South African Weather Service, Private Bag X097, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
4
Environment and Health Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
5
Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 September 2017 / Revised: 31 October 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 14 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [9953 KB, uploaded 15 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

South Africa has been measuring the ground-based solar UV index for more than two decades at six sites to raise awareness about the impacts of the solar UV index on human health. This paper is an exploratory study based on comparison with satellite UV index measurements from the OMI/AURA experiment. Relative UV index differences between ground-based and satellite-derived data ranged from 0 to 45% depending on the site and year. Most of time, these differences appear in winter. Some ground-based stations’ data had closer agreement with satellite-derived data. While the ground-based instruments are not intended for long-term trend analysis, they provide UV index information for public awareness instead, with some weak signs suggesting such long-term trends may exist in the ground-based data. The annual cycle, altitude, and latitude effects clearly appear in the UV index data measured in South Africa. This variability must be taken into account for the development of an excess solar UV exposure prevention strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: solar ultraviolet radiation; UV index; ground-based measurements; satellite-derived data; OMI/AURA; South Africa solar ultraviolet radiation; UV index; ground-based measurements; satellite-derived data; OMI/AURA; South Africa
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Cadet, J.-M.; Bencherif, H.; Portafaix, T.; Lamy, K.; Ncongwane, K.; Coetzee, G.J.R.; Wright, C.Y. Comparison of Ground-Based and Satellite-Derived Solar UV Index Levels at Six South African Sites. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1384.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top