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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 436; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040436

Non-Responsive Feeding Practices, Unhealthy Eating Behaviors, and Risk of Child Overweight and Obesity in Southeast Asia: A Systematic Review

1
Department of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts—Boston, Boston, MA 02125, USA
2
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02125, USA
3
Department of Nursing, University of Massachusetts—Boston, Boston, MA 02125, USA
4
Health Studies and Department of Kinesiology, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA
5
Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA
6
Boromarajonani Nursing College Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai 50180, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 25 February 2017 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 12 April 2017 / Published: 19 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [428 KB, uploaded 19 April 2017]   |  

Abstract

Childhood obesity is increasing dramatically in many Southeast Asian countries, and becoming a significant public health concern. This review summarizes the evidence on associations between parental feeding practices, child eating behaviors, and the risk of overweight and obesity in Southeast Asian children 2–12 years old. We systematically searched five electronic academic/research (PubMed, PsycINFO, ProQuest Nursing, Medline, and CINAHL) databases using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement for peer-reviewed studies published in English between January 2000 and December 2016. Fourteen observational studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Reviewed studies were examined separately for preschool- and school-aged children and revealed that non-responsive parental feeding practices and unhealthy child eating behaviors were associated with a risk of child overweight and obesity in several Southeast Asian countries. Nonetheless, due to the small number of identified studies (n = 14) and because only about half of the Southeast Asian countries (Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, the Philippines, and Malaysia) were represented (5/11) in the examined studies, additional research is needed to further understand the factors associated with childhood obesity among children in Southeast Asia to develop interventions that are tailored to the specific needs of Southeast Asian countries and designed to address practices and behaviors that may promote childhood obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: feeding practices; eating behaviors; obesity; children; parents; Southeast Asia feeding practices; eating behaviors; obesity; children; parents; Southeast Asia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cristina Lindsay, A.; Sitthisongkram, S.; Greaney, M.L.; Wallington, S.F.; Ruengdej, P. Non-Responsive Feeding Practices, Unhealthy Eating Behaviors, and Risk of Child Overweight and Obesity in Southeast Asia: A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 436.

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