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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(5), 541; doi:10.3390/ijerph14050541

Violence Victimization in Korean Adolescents: Risk Factors and Psychological Problems

1
Department of Research Planning, Mental Health Research Institute, National Center for Mental Health 127, Yongmasan-ro, Gwangin-gu, Seoul 04933, Korea
2
Department of Psychology, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wing Hong Chui
Received: 1 April 2017 / Revised: 8 May 2017 / Accepted: 18 May 2017 / Published: 19 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [299 KB, uploaded 19 May 2017]

Abstract

We examined the risk factors for and psychological problems associated with violence victimization in a nationwide representative sample of Korean adolescents. Data from the 2016 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey was used. Participants were asked about their experience of being a victim of violence that required medical treatment during the past 12 months, as well as their perceived health, happiness, sleep satisfaction, stress, depressed mood, and suicidality. The 12-month prevalence of violence victimization requiring medical treatment was 2.4%. The results indicated that adolescents were at an increased risk for violence victimization if they were male, older, had parents of a foreign nationality, did not reside with their family, worked part time, resided in small cities or rural areas, were high or low in socioeconomic status (SES), exhibited high or low levels of academic performance, used alcohol or tobacco, and were sexually active. In addition, while violence victimization was negatively associated with perceived health and happiness, it was positively associated with perceived stress, depressed mood, and suicidality. The results indicate that a social disadvantage, involvement in risky behavior, and psychological problems are associated with violence victimization. Effective violence prevention efforts should thus target high-risk groups, and clinical attention is needed to address the psychological costs associated with violence victimization. View Full-Text
Keywords: risk factors; violence; victim; adolescents; bullying risk factors; violence; victim; adolescents; bullying
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Park, S.; Lee, Y.; Jang, H.; Jo, M. Violence Victimization in Korean Adolescents: Risk Factors and Psychological Problems. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 541.

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