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Minerals, Volume 7, Issue 3 (March 2017)

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Cover Story We identify that sequestration of SO42− as sparingly-soluble metal sulfides in an engineered [...] Read more.
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Research

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Open AccessArticle Flotation and Adsorption of a New Polysaccharide Depressant on Pyrite and Talc in the Presence of a Pre-Adsorbed Xanthate Collector
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 40; doi:10.3390/min7030040
Received: 7 February 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 15 March 2017 / Published: 16 March 2017
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Abstract
The flotation and adsorption of a new polysaccharide konjac gum (KG) on pyrite and talc in the presence of pre-adsorbed potassium butyl xanthate (PBX) is investigated. The micro-flotation results show that KG is a quality depressant for talc and that conditioning the minerals
[...] Read more.
The flotation and adsorption of a new polysaccharide konjac gum (KG) on pyrite and talc in the presence of pre-adsorbed potassium butyl xanthate (PBX) is investigated. The micro-flotation results show that KG is a quality depressant for talc and that conditioning the minerals initially with PBX before KG will increase the recovery difference between pyrite and talc. The results of artificially mixing the minerals show that compared with adding KG before PBX, when minerals are pre-adsorbed with PBX, the grade and the recovery of sulfur (S) increases by 1.96% and 5.44%, respectively. The contact angle results show that the addition of PBX before KG will increase the contact angles of pyrite, but the addition order of KG/PBX has little influence on the contact angles of talc. The adsorption tests show that KG can adsorb on pyrite and talc surfaces, while PBX can only adsorb on the pyrite surface. The addition order of KG/PBX affects the adsorption of KG and PBX on the pyrite surface but not on the talc surface. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra analysis further demonstrates the chemical adsorption of KG on pyrite and talc surfaces, while PBX chemisorbs on the pyrite surface. Based on these analyses, a schematic illustration of the reagent adsorption forms on pyrite and talc surfaces is drawn to explain the competitive adsorption of KG and PBX on mineral surfaces. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Sulfur Isotope Fractionation as an Indicator of Biogeochemical Processes in an AMD Passive Bioremediation System
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 41; doi:10.3390/min7030041
Received: 2 February 2017 / Revised: 11 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 17 March 2017
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Abstract
Sulfate, the main dissolved contaminant in acid mine drainage (AMD), is ubiquitous in watersheds affected by coal and metal mining operations worldwide. Engineered passive bioremediation systems (PBS) are low-cost technologies that remediate sulfate contamination by promoting (1) precipitation of sulfate-bearing compounds, such as
[...] Read more.
Sulfate, the main dissolved contaminant in acid mine drainage (AMD), is ubiquitous in watersheds affected by coal and metal mining operations worldwide. Engineered passive bioremediation systems (PBS) are low-cost technologies that remediate sulfate contamination by promoting (1) precipitation of sulfate-bearing compounds, such as schwertmannite and gypsum; and (2) microbially-mediated sulfate reduction (BSR) to sulfide with subsequent precipitation of sulfide minerals. In this study, chemical and sulfur isotopic data are used to infer multiple pathways for sulfate sequestration in the Tab-Simco PBS. By simultaneously monitoring sulfate concentrations and δ34SSO4 values at four sampling points across the PBS, we (1) identified that the organic layer within the bioreactor was the primary site of BSR processes contributing to sulfate sequestration; (2) observed seasonal variations of BSR processes; (3) estimated that initially the BSR processes contributed up to 30% to sulfate sequestration in the Tab-Simco bioreactor; and (4) determined that BSR contribution to sulfate sequestration continuously declined over the PBS operational lifetime. Together, our results highlight the utility of combining geochemical and microbial fingerprinting techniques to decipher complementary processes involved in sulfur cycling in a PBS as well as the value of adding the sulfur isotope approach as an essential tool to help understand, predict, prevent and mitigate sulfate contamination in AMD-impacted systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogeochemistry of Acid Mine Drainage)
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Open AccessArticle Strategies for Reduced Acid and Metalliferous Drainage by Pyrite Surface Passivation
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 42; doi:10.3390/min7030042
Received: 16 December 2016 / Revised: 13 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 17 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4465 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD) is broadly accepted to be a major global environmental problem facing the mining industry, requiring expensive management and mitigation. A series of laboratory-scale kinetic leach column (KLC) experiments, using both synthetic and natural mine wastes, were carried out
[...] Read more.
Acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD) is broadly accepted to be a major global environmental problem facing the mining industry, requiring expensive management and mitigation. A series of laboratory-scale kinetic leach column (KLC) experiments, using both synthetic and natural mine wastes, were carried out to test the efficacy of our pyrite passivation strategy (developed from previous research) for robust and sustainable AMD management. For the synthetic waste KLC tests, initial treatment with lime-saturated water was found to be of paramount importance for maintaining long-term circum-neutral pH, favourable for the formation and preservation of the pyrite surface passivating layer and reduced acid generation rate. Following the initial lime-saturated water treatment, minimal additional alkalinity (calcite-saturated water) was required to maintain circum-neutral pH for the maintenance of pyrite surface passivation. KLC tests examining natural potentially acid forming (PAF) waste, with much greater peak acidity than that of the synthetic waste, blended with lime (≈2 wt %) with and without natural non-acid-forming (NAF) waste covers, were carried out. The addition of lime and use of NAF covers maintained circum-neutral leachate pH up to 24 weeks. During this time, the net acidity generated was found to be significantly reduced by the overlying NAF cover. If the reduced rate of acidity production from the natural PAF waste is sustained, the addition of smaller (more economically-feasible) amounts of lime, together with application of NAF wastes as covers, could be trialled as a potential cost-effective AMD mitigation strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogeochemistry of Acid Mine Drainage)
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Open AccessArticle Optimal Location of Vanadium in Muscovite and Its Geometrical and Electronic Properties by DFT Calculation
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 32; doi:10.3390/min7030032
Received: 26 December 2016 / Revised: 17 February 2017 / Accepted: 17 February 2017 / Published: 24 February 2017
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Abstract
Vanadium-bearing muscovite is the most valuable component of stone coal, which is a unique source of vanadium manufacture in China. Numbers of experimental studies have been carried out to destroy the carrier muscovite’s structure for efficient extraction of vanadium. Hence, the vanadium location
[...] Read more.
Vanadium-bearing muscovite is the most valuable component of stone coal, which is a unique source of vanadium manufacture in China. Numbers of experimental studies have been carried out to destroy the carrier muscovite’s structure for efficient extraction of vanadium. Hence, the vanadium location is necessary for exploring the essence of vanadium extraction. Although most infer that vanadium may substitute for trivalent aluminium (Al) as the isomorphism in muscovite for the similar atomic radius, there is not enough experimental evidence and theoretical supports to accurately locate the vanadium site in muscovite. In this study, the muscovite model and optimal location of vanadium were calculated by density functional theory (DFT). We find that the vanadium prefers to substitute for the hexa-coordinated aluminum of muscovite for less deformation and lower substitution energy. Furthermore, the local geometry and relative electronic properties were calculated in detail. The basal theoretical research of muscovite contained with vanadium are reported for the first time. It will make a further influence on the technology development of vanadium extraction from stone coal. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effect of CaF2/CaO Composite Additive on Roasting of Vanadium-Bearing Stone Coal and Acid Leaching Kinetics
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 43; doi:10.3390/min7030043
Received: 16 February 2017 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 15 March 2017 / Published: 18 March 2017
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Abstract
In this paper, the composite additive of CaF2/CaO was used to extract vanadium from stone coal, and the effect of roasting and leaching kinetics were studied. The purpose of this manuscript is to realize and improve the vanadium recovery from stone
[...] Read more.
In this paper, the composite additive of CaF2/CaO was used to extract vanadium from stone coal, and the effect of roasting and leaching kinetics were studied. The purpose of this manuscript is to realize and improve the vanadium recovery from stone coal using the composite additive. The experimental results indicated that the roasted clinker can be obtained under the conditions of CaF2/CaO at a mass ratio of 2:3 and a total additive amount of 10 wt %, a roasting temperature 850 °C, and a roasting time of 90 min. The leaching rate of vanadium can reach 86.74%, which increased by 16.4% compared with that of blank roasting under the conditions including a leaching temperature of 950 °C, a sulfuric acid concentration of 15% (v/v), a leaching time of 2 h, and a ratio of liquid to solid of 3 mL/g. The phase transformation analysis indicated that the muscovite structure was effectively destroyed during the roasting process comparing with no additives, which provided the basis for vanadium dissociation. Roasting can promote the formation of calcium vanadate, which is beneficial to the leaching of vanadium. The vanadium leaching kinetic analysis indicated that the activation energy of the acid leaching reaction decreased from 42.50 KJ/mol in the blank roasting to 22.56 KJ/mol in the calcified roasting, and the reaction order, with respect to the sulfuric acid concentration, decreased from 1.15 to 0.85. Calcified roasting has a better mineral activation than blank roasting, which can accelerate the leaching of vanadium and reduce the dependence on high-temperature and high acid levels in the leaching process. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Mechanism of Enhancing Extraction of Vanadium from Stone Coal by Roasting with MgO
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 33; doi:10.3390/min7030033
Received: 12 January 2017 / Revised: 3 February 2017 / Accepted: 23 February 2017 / Published: 27 February 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3760 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, the extraction of vanadium from stone coal by roasting with MgO and leaching with sulfuric acid has been investigated, and the mechanism analysis of stone coal roasting with MgO was studied. The results indicated that under the conditions that the
[...] Read more.
In this paper, the extraction of vanadium from stone coal by roasting with MgO and leaching with sulfuric acid has been investigated, and the mechanism analysis of stone coal roasting with MgO was studied. The results indicated that under the conditions that the mass fraction of the particles with grain size of 0–0.074 mm in raw ore was 75%, the roasting temperature was 500 °C, the roasting time was 1 h, MgO addition was 3 wt %, the sulfuric acid concentration was 20 vol %, the liquid-to-solid ratio was 1.5 mL/g, the leaching temperature was 95 °C, and leaching time was 2 h, resulting in a vanadium leaching efficiency of 86.63%, which increased by 7.73% compared with that of blank roasting. The mechanism analysis showed that the degree of calcite decomposition was low and, thus, magnesium vanadate was more easily formed than calcium vanadate below 500 °C. Moreover, magnesium vanadate was easier to dissolve than calcium vanadate during the sulfuric acid leaching process. Thus, the vanadium leaching efficiency was enhanced by using MgO as a roasting additive below 500 °C. Additionally, at high temperature the formation of tremolite would consume calcium oxide produced from the decomposition of calcite, thus, the formation of calcium vanadate was hindered, and V2O5 would react with MgO to form magnesium vanadate. Therefore, the vanadium leaching efficiency of roasting with MgO was higher than that of blank roasting at high temperature. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Temperature-Induced Desorption of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Confined on ZSM-5: An In Situ Synchrotron XRD Powder Diffraction Study
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 34; doi:10.3390/min7030034
Received: 29 December 2016 / Revised: 6 February 2017 / Accepted: 16 February 2017 / Published: 28 February 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2049 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The temperature-induced desorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) from aqueous solutions onto hydrophobic ZSM-5 was studied by in situ synchrotron powder diffraction and chromatographic techniques. This kind of information is crucial for designing and optimizing the regeneration treatment of such zeolite. The
[...] Read more.
The temperature-induced desorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) from aqueous solutions onto hydrophobic ZSM-5 was studied by in situ synchrotron powder diffraction and chromatographic techniques. This kind of information is crucial for designing and optimizing the regeneration treatment of such zeolite. The evolution of the structural features monitored by full profile Rietveld refinements revealed that a monoclinic (P21/n) to orthorhombic (Pnma) phase transition occurred at about 100 °C. The MTBE desorption process caused a remarkable change in the unit-cell parameters. Complete MTBE desorption was achieved upon heating at about 250 °C. Rietveld analysis demonstrated that the desorption process occurred without any significant zeolite crystallinity loss, but with slight deformations in the channel apertures. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Recycling Y and Eu from Waste Fluorescent Powder and High Temperature Solid-State Synthesis of Y2O3:Eu Phosphors
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 44; doi:10.3390/min7030044
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 15 March 2017 / Published: 20 March 2017
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Abstract
Y2O3:Eu were prepared through precursors synthesized by leaching tests, removing impurities, enrichment of Y and Eu from residual purified liquors, annealing treatment, and high temperature solid-state reaction method, which is the most suitable for large-scale production. The analysis of
[...] Read more.
Y2O3:Eu were prepared through precursors synthesized by leaching tests, removing impurities, enrichment of Y and Eu from residual purified liquors, annealing treatment, and high temperature solid-state reaction method, which is the most suitable for large-scale production. The analysis of product shows that the purity is 99.42%. The resultant powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL). Compared with the commercial phosphors, the XRD spectrum of the product samples revealed the synthesized particles to have a pure cubic Y2O3:Eu structure without any impurities in the crystalline phase. On the morphology, the Y2O3:Eu particles synthesized by a combustion and high temperature solid state process with sintering aids, were large and uniform. For luminescence property, the emission intensity of Y2O3:Eu phosphors synthesized by combustion process and high temperature solid state process with sintering aids were higher than those without sintering aids, at 1400 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Resources and the Environment)
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Open AccessArticle On the Origin of Bastnaesite-(La,Nd,Y) in the Nissi (Patitira) Bauxite Laterite Deposit, Lokris, Greece
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 45; doi:10.3390/min7030045
Received: 23 November 2016 / Revised: 6 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 21 March 2017
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Abstract
A detailed geochemical study and a thorough mineralogical description of the rare-earth elements (REE)-minerals and associated minerals were carried out in two vertical profiles of approximately 4 m length, from the Nissi (Patitira) bauxite laterite deposit, Lokris, Greece, characterized by the presence of
[...] Read more.
A detailed geochemical study and a thorough mineralogical description of the rare-earth elements (REE)-minerals and associated minerals were carried out in two vertical profiles of approximately 4 m length, from the Nissi (Patitira) bauxite laterite deposit, Lokris, Greece, characterized by the presence of goethite in small sizes resembling bacterial cell coated by goethite and a significant REE enrichment. The enrichment of the REE concentrated in bastnaesite-group minerals, the intergrowths between REE-minerals and Al–Ni–silicates with significant sulfur contents and their association with goethite microtextures interpreted as bacteriomorphic, indicate REE remobilization along with iron bio-leaching and re-precipitation on karstified limestone. In addition to the previous-reported hydroxylbastnaesites, a (La,Nd,Y)(CO3)F member of the bastnaesite-group associated with Al–Ni–silicates were identified, the stability of which may reflect the dependence on the source rocks and the local variations of pH-Eh. Interaction between downward percolating water and carbonate rocks seems to be a very effective mechanism for REE fluorocarbonates deposition under alkaline and reducing conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rare-Earth Carbonates)
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Open AccessArticle Visual Exploration of the Spatiotemporal Evolution Law of Overburden Failure and Mining-Induced Fractures: A Case Study of the Wangjialing Coal Mine in China
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 35; doi:10.3390/min7030035
Received: 9 November 2016 / Accepted: 22 February 2017 / Published: 2 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5123 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The borehole television approach is an effective way of detecting mining-induced fractures in overburden strata as it can visualize fractures to facilitate a quantitative analysis of size, quantity, length, and other features. In this article, the borehole television approach is applied on panel
[...] Read more.
The borehole television approach is an effective way of detecting mining-induced fractures in overburden strata as it can visualize fractures to facilitate a quantitative analysis of size, quantity, length, and other features. In this article, the borehole television approach is applied on panel 20105 of the Wangjialing Coal Mine in China to investigate the overburden movement and spatiotemporal evolution law of mining-induced fractures from the coal seam to ground surface. The results revealed that the overburden strata experienced the phases of roof caving, generation of fracture, bed separation, dislocations, fracture propagation, surface subsidence, and closing of fractures. The process can be divided into the initiation stage, the active stage, and the degradation stage along the mining direction. For exploited working faces, the caved zone height is 2.9–4.11 times the mining height, and the height of the fractured zone is 19.35–22.19 times the mining height. The height range of the three parts in the fractured zone is 24–26, 40–45, and 30–35 m. Significant fractures were observed in the bending zone. Step subsidence and cracks, which indicate severe damages, were observed on the ground surface above the goaf. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Recovery Process of Li, Al and Si from Lepidolite by Leaching with HF
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 36; doi:10.3390/min7030036
Received: 5 January 2017 / Accepted: 1 March 2017 / Published: 3 March 2017
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Abstract
This work describes the development of a new process for the recovery of Li, Al and Si along with the proposal of a flow sheet for the precipitation of those metals. The developed process is comprised of lepidolite acid digestion with hydrofluoric acid,
[...] Read more.
This work describes the development of a new process for the recovery of Li, Al and Si along with the proposal of a flow sheet for the precipitation of those metals. The developed process is comprised of lepidolite acid digestion with hydrofluoric acid, and the subsequent precipitation of the metals present in the leach liquor. The leaching operational parameters studied were: reaction time, temperature and HF concentration. The experimental results indicate that the optimal conditions to achieve a Li extraction higher than 90% were: solid-liquid ratio, 1.82% (w/v); temperature, 123 °C; HF concentration, 7% (v/v); stirring speed, 330 rpm; and reaction time, 120 min. Al and Si can be recovered as Na3AlF6 and K2SiF6. LiF was separated from the leach liquor during water evaporation, with recovery values of 92%. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Mining-Related Selenium Contamination in Alaska, and the State of Current Knowledge
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 46; doi:10.3390/min7030046
Received: 9 December 2016 / Revised: 10 March 2017 / Accepted: 12 March 2017 / Published: 21 March 2017
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Abstract
Selenium pollution has been a topic of extensive research dating back further than the last decade and has attracted significant attention from several environmental and regulatory agencies in order to monitor and control its discharge from myriad industrial sources. The mining industry is
[...] Read more.
Selenium pollution has been a topic of extensive research dating back further than the last decade and has attracted significant attention from several environmental and regulatory agencies in order to monitor and control its discharge from myriad industrial sources. The mining industry is a prime contributor of hazardous selenium release in the aquatic systems and is responsible for both acute and chronic impacts on living organisms. Herein we provide an overview of selenium contamination issues, with a specific focus on selenium release from mining industries, including a discussion of various technologies commonly employed to treat selenium-impacted waters from mining discharge. Different cases pertaining to selenium release from Alaskan mines (during years 2000–2015) are also presented, along with measures taken to mitigate high concentration releases. For continued resource exploration and economic development activities, as well as environmental preservation, it is important to fundamentally understand such emerging and pressing issues as selenium contamination and investigate efficient technological approaches to counter these challenges. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Reducing the Entrainment of Gangue Fines in Low Grade Microcrystalline Graphite Ore Flotation Using Multi-Stage Grinding-Flotation Process
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 38; doi:10.3390/min7030038
Received: 14 October 2016 / Revised: 5 March 2017 / Accepted: 6 March 2017 / Published: 14 March 2017
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Abstract
A suitable grinding fineness and flow-sheet could potentially reduce the mechanical entrainment of gangue minerals in the flotation process of microcrystalline graphite. In this study, the suitable grinding fineness of a commercial graphite ore was estimated by mineralogy analysis and laboratory grind-flotation tests.
[...] Read more.
A suitable grinding fineness and flow-sheet could potentially reduce the mechanical entrainment of gangue minerals in the flotation process of microcrystalline graphite. In this study, the suitable grinding fineness of a commercial graphite ore was estimated by mineralogy analysis and laboratory grind-flotation tests. The target grind size of this ore should be 92% passing 74 μm based on the mineralogical evaluation and the flotation performance. A comparison of a single-stage and a three-stage grinding circuit was conducted. Experimental results demonstrated that the three-stage grinding circuit could effectively improve the separation effect, which was attributed to the reduction of slimes. In the end, a more desirable beneficiation result was obtained with the application of three-stage grinding-flotation process by minimizing gangue entrainment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flotation in Mineral Processing)
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Open AccessArticle The Use of Integrated Fluid Inclusion Studies for Constraining Petroleum Charge History at Parsons Pond, Western Newfoundland, Canada
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 39; doi:10.3390/min7030039
Received: 10 January 2017 / Revised: 22 February 2017 / Accepted: 27 February 2017 / Published: 12 March 2017
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Abstract
This study, based on fluid inclusion petrography, microthermometry and ultraviolet microspectroscopy of inclusion oil, investigates the petroleum charge history at Parsons Pond, western Newfoundland. To address this matter, drill core and cuttings samples of allochthonous and autochthonous strata in the Parson’s Pond area
[...] Read more.
This study, based on fluid inclusion petrography, microthermometry and ultraviolet microspectroscopy of inclusion oil, investigates the petroleum charge history at Parsons Pond, western Newfoundland. To address this matter, drill core and cuttings samples of allochthonous and autochthonous strata in the Parson’s Pond area were collected from three exploration wells. Fluid inclusions were examined from fragments of calcite and quartz veins, diagenetic cements in sandstone, and in large hydrothermal dolomite and calcite crystals. Primary aqueous inclusions in authigenic sandstone cements indicate that cementation occurred at relatively shallow depths and low temperatures (<50 °C). Hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions (petroleum, wet gas and gas) are generally restricted to calcite and quartz veins, indicating that petroleum and gas migration at Parson’s Pond is fracture-controlled. No hydrocarbons were observed in the diagenetic cements of the essentially tight sandstones. Fluid inclusion microthermometry and ultraviolet microspectroscopy indicate the presence of multiple generations of hydrocarbon fluid, ranging in composition from ~33 API gravity petroleum to pure CH4. Petrographic evidence suggests that hydrocarbons were generated multiple times during progressive burial and heating. In addition, the distribution of hydrocarbon bearing inclusions with depth suggests that deeper levels are gas-prone, with petroleum confined to relatively shallow depths. Although only gas flow was encountered during the drilling of exploration wells at Parson’s Pond, the presence of petroleum-bearing fluid inclusions in calcite and quartz veins indicates that the historical production from shallow wells in the Parsons Pond area likely tapped small reservoirs of fractured petroliferous strata. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluid Inclusions: Study Methods, Applications and Case Histories)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Application of Mineral Sorbents for Removal of Petroleum Substances: A Review
Minerals 2017, 7(3), 37; doi:10.3390/min7030037
Received: 15 December 2016 / Revised: 23 February 2017 / Accepted: 4 March 2017 / Published: 8 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (547 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Environmental pollution with petroleum products has become a major problem worldwide, and is a consequence of industrial growth. The development of sustainable methods for the removal of petroleum substances and their derivatives from aquatic and terrestrial environments and from air has therefore become
[...] Read more.
Environmental pollution with petroleum products has become a major problem worldwide, and is a consequence of industrial growth. The development of sustainable methods for the removal of petroleum substances and their derivatives from aquatic and terrestrial environments and from air has therefore become extremely important today. Advanced technologies and materials dedicated to this purpose are relatively expensive; sorption methods involving mineral sorbents are therefore popular and are widely described in the scientific literature. Mineral materials are easily available, low-cost, universal adsorbents and have a number of properties that make them suitable for the removal of petroleum substances. This review describes recent works on the use of natural, synthetic and modified mineral adsorbents for the removal of petroleum substances and their derivatives from roads, water and air. Full article
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