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Microarrays, Volume 2, Issue 4 (December 2013), Pages 284-339

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Copy Number Studies in Noisy Samples
Microarrays 2013, 2(4), 284-303; doi:10.3390/microarrays2040284
Received: 20 September 2013 / Revised: 24 October 2013 / Accepted: 25 October 2013 / Published: 6 November 2013
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Abstract
System noise was analyzed in 77 Affymetrix 6.0 samples from a previous clinical study of copy number variation (CNV). Twenty-three samples were classified as eligible for CNV detection, 29 samples as ineligible and 25 were classified as being of intermediate quality. New software
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System noise was analyzed in 77 Affymetrix 6.0 samples from a previous clinical study of copy number variation (CNV). Twenty-three samples were classified as eligible for CNV detection, 29 samples as ineligible and 25 were classified as being of intermediate quality. New software (“noise-free-cnv”) was developed to visualize the data and reduce system noise. Fresh DNA preparations were more likely to yield eligible samples (p < 0.001). Eligible samples had higher rates of successfully genotyped SNPs (p < 0.001) and lower variance of signal intensities (p < 0.001), yielded fewer CNV findings after Birdview analysis (p < 0.001), and showed a tendency to yield fewer PennCNV calls (p = 0.053). The noise-free-cnv software visualized trend patterns of noise in the signal intensities across the ordered SNPs, including a wave pattern of noise, being co-linear with the banding pattern of metaphase chromosomes, as well as system deviations of individual probe sets (per-SNP noise). Wave noise and per-SNP noise occurred independently and could be separately removed from the samples. We recommend a two-step procedure of CNV validation, including noise reduction and visual inspection of all CNV calls, prior to molecular validation of a selected number of putative CNVs. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview Chromosomal Microarrays in Prenatal Diagnosis: Time for a Change of Policy?
Microarrays 2013, 2(4), 304-317; doi:10.3390/microarrays2040304
Received: 22 October 2013 / Revised: 19 November 2013 / Accepted: 27 November 2013 / Published: 5 December 2013
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Abstract
Microarrays have replaced conventional karyotyping as a first-tier test for unbalanced chromosome anomalies in postnatal cytogenetics mainly due to their unprecedented resolution facilitating the detection of submicroscopic copy number changes at a rate of 10–20% depending on indication for testing. A number of
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Microarrays have replaced conventional karyotyping as a first-tier test for unbalanced chromosome anomalies in postnatal cytogenetics mainly due to their unprecedented resolution facilitating the detection of submicroscopic copy number changes at a rate of 10–20% depending on indication for testing. A number of studies have addressed the performance of microarrays for chromosome analyses in high risk pregnancies due to abnormal ultrasound findings and reported an excess detection rate between 5% and 10%. In low risk pregnancies, clear pathogenic copy number changes at the submicroscopic level were encountered in 1% or less. Variants of unclear clinical significance, unsolicited findings, and copy number changes with variable phenotypic consequences are the main issues of concern in the prenatal setting posing difficult management questions. The benefit of microarray testing may be limited in pregnancies with only moderately increased risks (advanced maternal age, positive first trimester test). It is suggested to not change the current policy of microarray application in prenatal diagnosis until more data on the clinical significance of copy number changes are available. Full article
Open AccessReview Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives
Microarrays 2013, 2(4), 318-339; doi:10.3390/microarrays2040318
Received: 16 October 2013 / Revised: 19 November 2013 / Accepted: 6 December 2013 / Published: 13 December 2013
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Abstract
Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and
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Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Applications of Microarrays)

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