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Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2030046

Analyzing Iterative Training Game Design: A Multi-Method Postmortem Analysis of CYCLES Training Center and CYCLES Carnivale

1
Department of Media Studies and Production, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
2
School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA
3
Department of Journalism and Technical Communication, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
4
1st Playable Productions, Troy, NY 12180, USA
5
Sarah M. Taylor LLC, Sedgwick, ME 04676, USA
6
Department of Communication, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
7
College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12222, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 June 2018 / Revised: 31 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Computer Interaction in Education)
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Abstract

That games can be used to teach specific content has been demonstrated numerous times. However, although specific game features have been conjectured to have an impact on learning outcomes, little empirical research exists on the impact of iterative design on learning outcomes. This article analyzes two games that have been developed to train an adult audience to recognize and avoid relying on six cognitive biases (three per game) in their decision making. The games were developed iteratively and were evaluated through a series of experiments. Although the experimental manipulations did not find a significant impact of the manipulated game features on the learning outcomes, each game iteration proved more successful than its predecessors at training players. Here, we outline a mixed-methods approach to postmortem game design analysis that helps us understand what might account for the improvement across games, and to identify new variables for future experimental training game studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: quantitative; video games; training; learning; game design; post mortem; cognitive biases quantitative; video games; training; learning; game design; post mortem; cognitive biases
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Shaw, A.; McKernan, B.; Martey, R.M.; Stromer-Galley, J.; Saulnier, E.T.; McLaren, E.; Rhodes, M.G.; Folkestad, J.E.; Taylor, S.M.; Kenski, K.; Clegg, B.A.; Stralkowski, T. Analyzing Iterative Training Game Design: A Multi-Method Postmortem Analysis of CYCLES Training Center and CYCLES Carnivale. Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2, 46.

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Multimodal Technologies Interact. EISSN 2414-4088 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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