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Special Issue "Animal Management Following Natural Disasters"

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A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Leslie Irvine

University of Colorado, Department of Sociology, Ketchum 223, 492-7039, UCB 327 Boulder, CO 80309, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human-animal relationships; animal selfhood; animal sheltering; animal welfare in disasters

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Disasters involving animals entail social, economic, moral, and psychological concerns. These include public health and safety, the human-animal bond, economic impact, and ethical and moral questions. This volume will advance knowledge on the topic of animals in disasters.

Manuscripts of original research using methods appropriate to the topic will be considered. Topics could include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) reducing animals’ vulnerability to disasters; (2) the role of the human-animal bond in post-disaster coping; (3) innovative rescue and response strategies; (4) improving preparedness; and (5) helping low-income and minority populations identify risks and create action plans.

Prof. Dr. Leslie Irvine
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 600 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • Disasters
  • Pets/companion animals
  • Livestock
  • Laboratory animals
  • Wildlife
  • Preparedness
  • Response

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Challenges of Managing Animals in Disasters in the U.S.
Animals 2015, 5(2), 173-192; doi:10.3390/ani5020173
Received: 8 July 2014 / Revised: 30 October 2014 / Accepted: 15 February 2015 / Published: 26 March 2015
PDF Full-text (687 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Common to many of the repeated issues surrounding animals in disasters in the U.S. is a pre-existing weak animal health infrastructure that is under constant pressure resulting from pet overpopulation. Unless this root cause is addressed, communities remain vulnerable to similar issues with
[...] Read more.
Common to many of the repeated issues surrounding animals in disasters in the U.S. is a pre-existing weak animal health infrastructure that is under constant pressure resulting from pet overpopulation. Unless this root cause is addressed, communities remain vulnerable to similar issues with animals they and others have faced in past disasters. In the US the plight of animals in disasters is frequently viewed primarily as a response issue and frequently handled by groups that are not integrated with the affected community’s emergency management. In contrast, animals, their owners, and communities would greatly benefit from integrating animal issues into an overall emergency management strategy for the community. There is no other factor contributing as much to human evacuation failure in disasters that is under the control of emergency management when a threat is imminent as pet ownership. Emergency managers can take advantage of the bond people have with their animals to instill appropriate behavior amongst pet owners in disasters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)
Open AccessArticle No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks
Animals 2014, 4(2), 214-240; doi:10.3390/ani4020214
Received: 14 February 2014 / Revised: 14 April 2014 / Accepted: 22 April 2014 / Published: 7 May 2014
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (137 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential
[...] Read more.
Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or ‘piggybacking’ disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general). Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required to overcome the challenges in accessing and engaging vulnerable groups. As the survival of humans and animals are so often intertwined, the benefits of increasing the resilience of vulnerable communities through animal attachment is twofold: human and animal lives can be saved together. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)
Open AccessCommunication Characteristics of a Canine Distemper Virus Outbreak in Dichato, Chile Following the February 2010 Earthquake
Animals 2013, 3(3), 843-854; doi:10.3390/ani3030843
Received: 15 July 2013 / Revised: 15 August 2013 / Accepted: 15 August 2013 / Published: 27 August 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (83 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Following the earthquake and tsunami disaster in Chile in February 2010, residents of Dichato reported high morbidity and mortality in dogs, descriptions of which resembled canine distemper virus (CDV). To assess the situation, free vaccine clinics were offered in April and May. Owner
[...] Read more.
Following the earthquake and tsunami disaster in Chile in February 2010, residents of Dichato reported high morbidity and mortality in dogs, descriptions of which resembled canine distemper virus (CDV). To assess the situation, free vaccine clinics were offered in April and May. Owner information, dog history and signalment were gathered; dogs received physical examinations and vaccines protecting against CDV, and other common canine pathogens. Blood was collected to screen for IgM antibodies to CDV. In total, 208 dogs received physical exams and vaccines were given to 177. IgM antibody titres to CDV were obtained for 104 dogs. Fifty-four dogs (51.9%) tested positive for CDV at the cut off titre of >1:50, but a total of 91.4% of dogs had a detectable titre >1:10. Most of the positive test results were in dogs less than 2 years of age; 33.5% had been previously vaccinated against CDV, and owners of 84 dogs (42.2%) reported clinical signs characteristic of CDV in their dogs following the disaster. The presence of endemic diseases in dog populations together with poor pre-disaster free-roaming dog management results in a potential for widespread negative effects following disasters. Creation of preparedness plans that include animal welfare, disease prevention and mitigation should be developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)
Open AccessArticle Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene
Animals 2012, 2(4), 529-539; doi:10.3390/ani2040529
Received: 10 July 2012 / Revised: 19 September 2012 / Accepted: 25 September 2012 / Published: 28 September 2012
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (105 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards
[...] Read more.
Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)
Open AccessArticle Companion Animals, Natural Disasters and the Law: An Australian Perspective
Animals 2012, 2(3), 380-394; doi:10.3390/ani2030380
Received: 1 August 2012 / Revised: 20 August 2012 / Accepted: 22 August 2012 / Published: 27 August 2012
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (87 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article examines the regulation of companion animal welfare during disasters, with some context provided by two recent major disaster events in Australia. Important general lessons for improved disaster management were identified in subsequent inquiries. However, the interests of companion animals continue to
[...] Read more.
This article examines the regulation of companion animal welfare during disasters, with some context provided by two recent major disaster events in Australia. Important general lessons for improved disaster management were identified in subsequent inquiries. However, the interests of companion animals continue to be inadequately addressed. This is because key assumptions underpinning disaster planning for companion animals—the primacy of human interests over animal interests and that individuals will properly address companion animal needs during times of disaster—are open to question. In particular these assumptions fail to recognise the inherent value of companion animals, underestimate the strong bond shared by some owners and their animals and, at the same time, overestimate the capacity of some owners to adequately meet the needs of their animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Effects of Severe Floods and Droughts on Wildlife of the Pantanal Wetland (Brazil)—A Review
Animals 2012, 2(4), 591-610; doi:10.3390/ani2040591
Received: 7 September 2012 / Revised: 25 September 2012 / Accepted: 9 October 2012 / Published: 18 October 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (127 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Flooding throughout the Pantanal is seasonal. The complex vegetative cover and high seasonal productivity support a diverse and abundant fauna. A gradient in flood level supports a range of major habitats in a complex mosaic with annual seasonality. The rivers and streams are
[...] Read more.
Flooding throughout the Pantanal is seasonal. The complex vegetative cover and high seasonal productivity support a diverse and abundant fauna. A gradient in flood level supports a range of major habitats in a complex mosaic with annual seasonality. The rivers and streams are lined with gallery forests, and other arboreal habitats exist in the more elevated areas. The remainder is either grasslands or seasonally flooded grasslands. The regional flora and fauna are adapted to annual water fluctuation. However, an inter-annual series of higher or lower rainfalls has caused either severe floods or drastic dry seasons. Large scale climate phenomena such as greenhouse gases, El Niño and La Niña influence the seasonality of floods and droughts in the Pantanal. Knowledge of severe floods and droughts, which characterize natural disasters, is fundamental for wildlife management and nature conservation of the Pantanal. Plants and wild animals, for example, are affected by tree mortality in riparian forest after extreme flooding, with consequent habitat modification for wild animals. In addition, human activities are also affected since cattle ranching and ecotourism are economically important in the region, and when seasons with unusual floods or droughts occur, areas with human settlements are impacted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessCase Report Challenges Encountered During the Veterinary Disaster Response: An Example from Chile
Animals 2013, 3(4), 1073-1085; doi:10.3390/ani3041073
Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 11 November 2013 / Accepted: 13 November 2013 / Published: 21 November 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (839 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Large-scale disasters have immeasurable effects on human and animal communities. Evaluating and reporting on the response successes and difficulties encountered serves to improve existing preparedness documents and provide support to those in the process of developing plans. Although the majority of disasters occur
[...] Read more.
Large-scale disasters have immeasurable effects on human and animal communities. Evaluating and reporting on the response successes and difficulties encountered serves to improve existing preparedness documents and provide support to those in the process of developing plans. Although the majority of disasters occur in low and middle income nations, less than 1% of the disaster literature originates from these countries. This report describes a response to a disease outbreak in domestic dogs in Dichato, Chile following the 2010 earthquake/tsunami. With no national plan coordinating the companion animal response, there was a chaotic approach among animal welfare organizations towards rescue, diagnosis, treatment and record-keeping. Similar to the medical response following the 1985 earthquake near Santiago, we experienced problems within our own teams in maintenance of data integrity and protocol compliance. Loss of infrastructure added complications with transportation, communications and acquisition of supplies. Similar challenges likely occur in most disasters, but can be reduced through pro-active planning at national and local levels. There is sufficient information to support the human and animal welfare benefits of including companion animals in national planning, and lessons learned through this and other experiences can assist planners in the development of comprehensive and locally relevant contingency plans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)
Open AccessOpinion Review of the Risks of Some Canine Zoonoses from Free-Roaming Dogs in the Post-Disaster Setting of Latin America
Animals 2013, 3(3), 855-865; doi:10.3390/ani3030855
Received: 26 July 2013 / Revised: 15 August 2013 / Accepted: 15 August 2013 / Published: 27 August 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (79 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the absence of humane and sustainable control strategies for free-roaming dogs (FRD) and the lack of effective disaster preparedness planning in developing regions of the world, the occurrence of canine zoonoses is a potentially important yet unrecognized issue. The existence of large
[...] Read more.
In the absence of humane and sustainable control strategies for free-roaming dogs (FRD) and the lack of effective disaster preparedness planning in developing regions of the world, the occurrence of canine zoonoses is a potentially important yet unrecognized issue. The existence of large populations of FRDs in Latin America predisposes communities to a host of public health problems that are all potentially exacerbated following disasters due to social and environmental disturbances. There are hundreds of recognized canine zoonoses but a paucity of recommendations for the mitigation of the risk of emergence following disasters. Although some of the symptoms of diseases most commonly reported in human populations following disasters resemble a host of canine zoonoses, there is little mention in key public health documents of FRDs posing any significant risk. We highlight five neglected canine zoonoses of importance in Latin America, and offer recommendations for pre- and post-disaster preparedness and planning to assist in mitigation of the transmission of canine zoonoses arising from FRDs following disasters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Management Following Natural Disasters)

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