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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5737-5749; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115737

Effect of Urinary Bisphenol A on Androgenic Hormones and Insulin Resistance in Preadolescent Girls: A Pilot Study from the Ewha Birth & Growth Cohort

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710, Korea
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710, Korea
3
Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710, Korea
4
Colleage of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea
5
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 August 2013 / Revised: 28 October 2013 / Accepted: 28 October 2013 / Published: 1 November 2013
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Abstract

To assess the effect of urinary bisphenol A (BPA) on repeated measurements of androgenic hormones and metabolic indices, we used multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) adjusted for potential confounders at baseline. During July to August 2011, 80 preadolescent girls enrolled in the Ewha Birth & Growth Cohort study participated in a follow-up study and then forty-eight of them (60.0%) came back one year later. Baseline levels of estradiol and androstenedione were higher in the BPA group than in the non-BPA group. One year later, girls in the high BPA exposure group showed higher levels of androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, than those in the other groups (p < 0.05). In MANOVA, estradiol and androstenedione showed significant differences among groups, while dehydroepiandrosterone, insulin, and HOMA-IR showed marginally significant differences. Exposure to BPA may affect endocrine metabolism in preadolescents. However, further investigation is required to elucidate the mechanisms linking BPA with regulation of androgenic hormones. View Full-Text
Keywords: androgenic hormones; bisphenol A; child health; endocrine disruptor chemicals; insulin resistance androgenic hormones; bisphenol A; child health; endocrine disruptor chemicals; insulin resistance
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, H.A.; Kim, Y.J.; Lee, H.; Gwak, H.S.; Park, E.A.; Cho, S.J.; Kim, H.S.; Ha, E.H.; Park, H. Effect of Urinary Bisphenol A on Androgenic Hormones and Insulin Resistance in Preadolescent Girls: A Pilot Study from the Ewha Birth & Growth Cohort. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 5737-5749.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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