Next Article in Journal
Surveillance and Correlation of Antibiotic Consumption and Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northeast China, 2003–2011
Next Article in Special Issue
The Effects of Vision-Related Aspects on Noise Perception of Wind Turbines in Quiet Areas
Previous Article in Journal
Annoyance and Worry in a Petrochemical Industrial Area—Prevalence, Time Trends and Risk Indicators
Previous Article in Special Issue
Do Quiet Areas Afford Greater Health-Related Quality of Life than Noisy Areas?
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(4), 1439-1461; doi:10.3390/ijerph10041439

How Pleasant Sounds Promote and Annoying Sounds Impede Health: A Cognitive Approach

ALICE Institute, Artificial Intelligence, University of Groningen, Broerstraat 4. Groningen 9747 AG, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 February 2013 / Revised: 19 March 2013 / Accepted: 21 March 2013 / Published: 8 April 2013
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [417 KB, uploaded 19 June 2014]   |  

Abstract

This theoretical paper addresses the cognitive functions via which quiet and in general pleasurable sounds promote and annoying sounds impede health. The article comprises a literature analysis and an interpretation of how the bidirectional influence of appraising the environment and the feelings of the perceiver can be understood in terms of core affect and motivation. This conceptual basis allows the formulation of a detailed cognitive model describing how sonic content, related to indicators of safety and danger, either allows full freedom over mind-states or forces the activation of a vigilance function with associated arousal. The model leads to a number of detailed predictions that can be used to provide existing soundscape approaches with a solid cognitive science foundation that may lead to novel approaches to soundscape design. These will take into account that louder sounds typically contribute to distal situational awareness while subtle environmental sounds provide proximal situational awareness. The role of safety indicators, mediated by proximal situational awareness and subtle sounds, should become more important in future soundscape research.
Keywords: quietness; quiet areas; quality-of-life; soundscape; mind-states; pleasure; annoyance; needs; arousal; attention; audition; core affect; motivation; safety quietness; quiet areas; quality-of-life; soundscape; mind-states; pleasure; annoyance; needs; arousal; attention; audition; core affect; motivation; safety
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Andringa, T.C.; Lanser, J.J.L. How Pleasant Sounds Promote and Annoying Sounds Impede Health: A Cognitive Approach. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1439-1461.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top