Next Article in Journal
Dendritic Cells in Human Pneumovirus and Metapneumovirus Infections
Next Article in Special Issue
Feline Foamy Virus-Based Vectors: Advantages of an Authentic Animal Model
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Bacterial Chaperones in the Circulative Transmission of Plant Viruses by Insect Vectors
Previous Article in Special Issue
Influence of Naturally Occurring Simian Foamy Viruses (SFVs) on SIV Disease Progression in the Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Model
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Viruses 2013, 5(6), 1536-1552; doi:10.3390/v5061536

Simian Foamy Virus in Non-Human Primates and Cross-Species Transmission to Humans in Gabon: An Emerging Zoonotic Disease in Central Africa?

1
Unité de Rétrovirologie, Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville BP 769, Gabon
2
Institut Pasteur de Bangui, Bangui BP 923, Central African Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 May 2013 / Revised: 9 June 2013 / Accepted: 10 June 2013 / Published: 19 June 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Foamy Virus (FV) Research)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [19770 KB, uploaded 12 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

It is now known that all human retroviruses have a non-human primate counterpart. It has been reported that the presence of these retroviruses in humans is the result of interspecies transmission. Several authors have described the passage of a simian retrovirus, simian foamy virus (SFV), from primates to humans. To better understand this retroviral “zoonosis” in natural settings, we evaluated the presence of SFV in both captive and wild non-human primates and in humans at high risk, such as hunters and people bitten by a non-human primate, in Gabon, central Africa. A high prevalence of SFV was found in blood samples from non-human primates and in bush meat collected across the country. Mandrills were found to be highly infected with two distinct strains of SFV, depending on their geographical location. Furthermore, samples collected from hunters and non-human primate laboratory workers showed clear, extensive cross-species transmission of SFV. People who had been bitten by mandrills, gorillas and chimpanzees had persistent SFV infection with low genetic drift. Thus, SFV is presumed to be transmitted from non-human primates mainly through severe bites, involving contact between infected saliva and blood. In this review, we summarize and discuss our five-year observations on the prevalence and dissemination of SFV in humans and non-human primates in Gabon.
Keywords: SFV; mandrills; wild-born non-human primates; interspecies transmission; Gabon; central Africa SFV; mandrills; wild-born non-human primates; interspecies transmission; Gabon; central Africa
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Mouinga-Ondémé, A.; Kazanji, M. Simian Foamy Virus in Non-Human Primates and Cross-Species Transmission to Humans in Gabon: An Emerging Zoonotic Disease in Central Africa? Viruses 2013, 5, 1536-1552.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Viruses EISSN 1999-4915 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top