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Future Internet, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2010), Pages 1-95

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Metadata for Name Disambiguation and Collocation
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 1-15; doi:10.3390/fi2010001
Received: 30 November 2009 / Revised: 30 December 2009 / Accepted: 2 January 2010 / Published: 5 January 2010
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (137 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Searching names of persons, families, and organizations is often difficult in online databases because different persons or organizations frequently share the same name and because a single person’s or organization’s name may appear in different forms in various online documents. Databases and search
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Searching names of persons, families, and organizations is often difficult in online databases because different persons or organizations frequently share the same name and because a single person’s or organization’s name may appear in different forms in various online documents. Databases and search engines can use metadata as a tool to solve the problem of name ambiguity and name variation in online databases. This article describes the challenges names pose in information retrieval and some emerging name metadata databases that can help ameliorate the problems. Effective name disambiguation and collocation increase search precision and recall and can improve assessment of scholarly work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metadata and Markup)
Open AccessArticle A Fully Cognitive Approach for Future Internet
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 16-29; doi:10.3390/fi2010016
Received: 16 November 2009 / Revised: 6 January 2010 / Accepted: 19 January 2010 / Published: 22 January 2010
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (135 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper deals with an autonomous cognitive network management architecture which aims at achieving inter-network (horizontal) and inter-layer (vertical) cross-optimization. The proposed architecture is based on the so-called Cognitive Managers transparently embedded in properly selected network nodes. The core of each Cognitive Manager
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This paper deals with an autonomous cognitive network management architecture which aims at achieving inter-network (horizontal) and inter-layer (vertical) cross-optimization. The proposed architecture is based on the so-called Cognitive Managers transparently embedded in properly selected network nodes. The core of each Cognitive Manager are the so-called thinking modules, which are in charge of taking consistent and coordinated decisions according to a fully cognitive approach. The thinking modules potentially avail of information coming from both the transport and the service/content layers of all networks and, based on all this inter-layer and inter-network information, take consistent and coordinated decisions impacting the different layers, aiming at the overall inter-layer, inter-network optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Network Architectures)
Open AccessCommunication Selective Redundancy Removal: A Framework for Data Hiding
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 30-40; doi:10.3390/fi2010030
Received: 30 November 2009 / Revised: 4 February 2010 / Accepted: 10 February 2010 / Published: 15 February 2010
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (85 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Data hiding techniques have so far concentrated on adding or modifying irrelevant information in order to hide a message. However, files in widespread use, such as HTML documents, usually exhibit high redundancy levels, caused by code-generation programs. Such redundancy may be removed by
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Data hiding techniques have so far concentrated on adding or modifying irrelevant information in order to hide a message. However, files in widespread use, such as HTML documents, usually exhibit high redundancy levels, caused by code-generation programs. Such redundancy may be removed by means of optimization software. Redundancy removal, if applied selectively, enables information hiding. This work introduces Selective Redundancy Removal (SRR) as a framework for hiding data. An example application of the framework is given in terms of hiding information in HTML documents. Non-uniformity across documents may raise alarms. Nevertheless, selective application of optimization techniques might be due to the legitimate use of optimization software not supporting all the optimization methods, or configured to not use all of them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Security for Next Generation Wireless and Decentralized Systems)
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Open AccessArticle Theoretical Foundations of the Web: Cognition, Communication, and Co-Operation. Towards an Understanding of Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 41-59; doi:10.3390/fi2010041
Received: 13 November 2009 / Revised: 17 February 2010 / Accepted: 18 February 2010 / Published: 19 February 2010
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (143 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Currently, there is much talk of Web 2.0 and Social Software. A common understanding of these notions is not yet in existence. The question of what makes Social Software social has thus far also remained unacknowledged. In this paper we provide a theoretical
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Currently, there is much talk of Web 2.0 and Social Software. A common understanding of these notions is not yet in existence. The question of what makes Social Software social has thus far also remained unacknowledged. In this paper we provide a theoretical understanding of these notions by outlining a model of the Web as a techno-social system that enhances human cognition towards communication and co-operation. According to this understanding, we identify three qualities of the Web, namely Web 1.0 as a Web of cognition, Web 2.0 as a Web of human communication, and Web 3.0 as a Web of co-operation. We use the terms Web 1.0, Web 2.0, Web 3.0 not in a technical sense, but for describing and characterizing the social dynamics and information processes that are part of the Internet. Full article
Open AccessArticle Dynamic QoS Evaluation of Multimedia Contents in Wireless Networks by “Double-Boomerang” Watermarking
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 60-73; doi:10.3390/fi2010060
Received: 4 January 2010 / Revised: 2 February 2010 / Accepted: 2 March 2010 / Published: 8 March 2010
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work presents a cooperative network-aware processing of multimedia content for dynamic quality of service management in wireless IP networks. Our technique can be also used for quality control in UMTS environments, exploiting the tracing watermarking recently introduced in literature. In this work,
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This work presents a cooperative network-aware processing of multimedia content for dynamic quality of service management in wireless IP networks. Our technique can be also used for quality control in UMTS environments, exploiting the tracing watermarking recently introduced in literature. In this work, we use the transmitted video-sequences to monitor the QoS in a videoconference call. The video-sequence of every active user travels on the communication link, one time as video (transparent mode), one time as watermark (hidden mode) describing a boomerang trajectory. The results obtained through our simulation trials confirm the validity of such approach. In fact, the advantages of distributing the management process are (i) an easier and more precise localization of the cause of QoS problems, (ii) a better knowledge of local situations, (iii) a lower complexity for a single QoS agent and (iv) an increase in possible actions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)

Review

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Open AccessReview Markup in Engineering Design: A Discourse
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 74-95; doi:10.3390/fi2010074
Received: 4 January 2010 / Revised: 26 February 2010 / Accepted: 2 March 2010 / Published: 11 March 2010
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (248 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Today’s engineering companies are facing unprecedented competition in a global market place. There is now a knowledge intensive shift towards whole product lifecycle support, and collaborative environments. It has become particularly important to capture information, knowledge and experiences about previous design and following
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Today’s engineering companies are facing unprecedented competition in a global market place. There is now a knowledge intensive shift towards whole product lifecycle support, and collaborative environments. It has become particularly important to capture information, knowledge and experiences about previous design and following stages during their product lifecycle, so as to retrieve and reuse such information in new and follow-on designs activities. Recently, with the rapid development and adoption of digital technologies, annotation and markup are becoming important tools for information communication, retrieval and management. Such techniques are being increasingly applied to an array of applications and different digital items, such as text documents, 2D images and 3D models. This paper presents a state-of-the-art review of recent research in markup for engineering design, including a number of core markup languages and main markup strategies. Their applications and future utilization in engineering design, including multi-viewpoint of product models, capture of information and rationale across the whole product lifecycle, integration of engineering design processes, and engineering document management, are comprehensively discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metadata and Markup)

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