Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Future Internet, Volume 6, Issue 2 (June 2014), Pages 190-413

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-10
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle The Problems and Challenges of Managing Crowd Sourced Audio-Visual Evidence
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 190-202; doi:10.3390/fi6020190
Received: 8 January 2014 / Revised: 25 February 2014 / Accepted: 26 February 2014 / Published: 1 April 2014
PDF Full-text (203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A number of recent incidents, such as the Stanley Cup Riots, the uprisings in the Middle East and the London riots have demonstrated the value of crowd sourced audio-visual evidence wherein citizens submit audio-visual footage captured on mobile phones and other devices to
[...] Read more.
A number of recent incidents, such as the Stanley Cup Riots, the uprisings in the Middle East and the London riots have demonstrated the value of crowd sourced audio-visual evidence wherein citizens submit audio-visual footage captured on mobile phones and other devices to aid governmental institutions, responder agencies and law enforcement authorities to confirm the authenticity of incidents and, in the case of criminal activity, to identify perpetrators. The use of such evidence can present a significant logistical challenge to investigators, particularly because of the potential size of data gathered through such mechanisms and the added problems of time-lining disparate sources of evidence and, subsequently, investigating the incident(s). In this paper we explore this problem and, in particular, outline the pressure points for an investigator. We identify and explore a number of particular problems related to the secure receipt of the evidence, imaging, tagging and then time-lining the evidence, and the problem of identifying duplicate and near duplicate items of audio-visual evidence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary and Future Digital Forensics)
Open AccessArticle Routing Diverse Evacuees with the Cognitive Packet Network Algorithm
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 203-222; doi:10.3390/fi6020203
Received: 19 February 2014 / Revised: 2 April 2014 / Accepted: 3 April 2014 / Published: 17 April 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (355 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Regarding mobility, health conditions and personal preferences, evacuees can be categorized into different classes in realistic environments. Previous emergency navigation algorithms that direct evacuees with a single decision rule cannot fulfil civilians’ distinct service requirements and increase the likelihood of inducing destructive crowd
[...] Read more.
Regarding mobility, health conditions and personal preferences, evacuees can be categorized into different classes in realistic environments. Previous emergency navigation algorithms that direct evacuees with a single decision rule cannot fulfil civilians’ distinct service requirements and increase the likelihood of inducing destructive crowd behaviours, such as clogging, pushing and trampling, due to diverse mobility. This paper explores a distributed emergency navigation algorithm that employs the cognitive packet network concept to tailor different quality of service needs to different categories of evacuees. In addition, a congestion-aware algorithm is presented to predict the future congestion degree of a path with respect to the observed population density, arrival rate and service rate of each route segment. Experiments are implemented in a simulated environment populated with autonomous agents. Results show that our algorithm can increase the number of survivors while providing improved quality of service. Full article
Open AccessArticle An Ontology of the Appropriate Assessment of Municipal Master Plans Related to Sardinia (Italy)
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 223-241; doi:10.3390/fi6020223
Received: 6 March 2014 / Revised: 26 March 2014 / Accepted: 11 April 2014 / Published: 23 April 2014
PDF Full-text (744 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper discusses some key points related to the ontology of the “appropriate assessment” [1] procedure concerning plans significantly affecting Natura 2000 sites. We study this ontology by discussing its implementation into the adjustment process of the master plans of the regional municipalities
[...] Read more.
This paper discusses some key points related to the ontology of the “appropriate assessment” [1] procedure concerning plans significantly affecting Natura 2000 sites. We study this ontology by discussing its implementation into the adjustment process of the master plans of the regional municipalities of Sardinia (Italy) to the Regional Landscape Plan (RLP) and put as evidence some important general observations, coming from the case study, concerning the utility and effectiveness of the ontological conceptual framework in order to help planners and decision-makers understand and structure the assessment process of plans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
Open AccessArticle Exploiting Multimedia in Creating and Analysing Multimedia Web Archives
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 242-260; doi:10.3390/fi6020242
Received: 25 February 2014 / Revised: 31 March 2014 / Accepted: 16 April 2014 / Published: 24 April 2014
PDF Full-text (3652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The data contained on the web and the social web are inherently multimedia and consist of a mixture of textual, visual and audio modalities. Community memories embodied on the web and social web contain a rich mixture of data from these modalities. In
[...] Read more.
The data contained on the web and the social web are inherently multimedia and consist of a mixture of textual, visual and audio modalities. Community memories embodied on the web and social web contain a rich mixture of data from these modalities. In many ways, the web is the greatest resource ever created by human-kind. However, due to the dynamic and distributed nature of the web, its content changes, appears and disappears on a daily basis. Web archiving provides a way of capturing snapshots of (parts of) the web for preservation and future analysis. This paper provides an overview of techniques we have developed within the context of the EU funded ARCOMEM (ARchiving COmmunity MEMories) project to allow multimedia web content to be leveraged during the archival process and for post-archival analysis. Through a set of use cases, we explore several practical applications of multimedia analytics within the realm of web archiving, web archive analysis and multimedia data on the web in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Archiving Community Memories)
Open AccessArticle Towards Horizontal Architecture for Autonomic M2M Service Networks
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 261-301; doi:10.3390/fi6020261
Received: 9 January 2014 / Revised: 13 March 2014 / Accepted: 8 April 2014 / Published: 6 May 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (3941 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Today, increasing number of industrial application cases rely on the Machine to Machine (M2M) services exposed from physical devices. Such M2M services enable interaction of physical world with the core processes of company information systems. However, there are grand challenges related to complexity
[...] Read more.
Today, increasing number of industrial application cases rely on the Machine to Machine (M2M) services exposed from physical devices. Such M2M services enable interaction of physical world with the core processes of company information systems. However, there are grand challenges related to complexity and “vertical silos” limiting the M2M market scale and interoperability. It is here expected that horizontal approach for the system architecture is required for solving these challenges. Therefore, a set of architectural principles and key enablers for the horizontal architecture have been specified in this work. A selected set of key enablers called as autonomic M2M manager, M2M service capabilities, M2M messaging system, M2M gateways towards energy constrained M2M asset devices and creation of trust to enable end-to-end security for M2M applications have been developed. The developed key enablers have been evaluated separately in different scenarios dealing with smart metering, car sharing and electric bike experiments. The evaluation results shows that the provided architectural principles, and developed key enablers establish a solid ground for future research and seem to enable communication between objects and applications, which are not initially been designed to communicate together. The aim as the next step in this research is to create a combined experimental system to evaluate the system interoperability and performance in a more detailed manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward people aware IoT)
Open AccessArticle Software-Defined Networking Using OpenFlow: Protocols, Applications and Architectural Design Choices
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 302-336; doi:10.3390/fi6020302
Received: 16 January 2014 / Revised: 12 April 2014 / Accepted: 25 April 2014 / Published: 12 May 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (432 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We explain the notion of software-defined networking (SDN), whose southbound interface may be implemented by the OpenFlow protocol. We describe the operation of OpenFlow and summarize the features of specification versions 1.0–1.4. We give an overview of existing SDN-based applications grouped by topic
[...] Read more.
We explain the notion of software-defined networking (SDN), whose southbound interface may be implemented by the OpenFlow protocol. We describe the operation of OpenFlow and summarize the features of specification versions 1.0–1.4. We give an overview of existing SDN-based applications grouped by topic areas. Finally, we point out architectural design choices for SDN using OpenFlow and discuss their performance implications. Full article
Open AccessArticle Sharing Followers in e-Government Twitter Accounts: The Case of Greece
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 337-358; doi:10.3390/fi6020337
Received: 7 February 2014 / Revised: 4 April 2014 / Accepted: 26 April 2014 / Published: 14 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (340 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The recent emergence of e-government and online social media offers opportunities for governments to meet the demands and expectations of citizens, to provide value-added services and overcome barriers of reduced public budgets. Twitter is the most popular microblogging platform that can facilitate interaction
[...] Read more.
The recent emergence of e-government and online social media offers opportunities for governments to meet the demands and expectations of citizens, to provide value-added services and overcome barriers of reduced public budgets. Twitter is the most popular microblogging platform that can facilitate interaction and engagement. It is widely used by government agencies, public affairs practitioners, non-government organizations, members of Parliament and politicians. The paper aims to explore the use of Twitter by government agencies in Greece and record Twitter followers’ preferences regarding which accounts they follow. The paper records 27 Greek e-government Twitter accounts and their 107,107 followers. It uses a data mining technique, association rules and two multivariate statistical methods, multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis and proposes the use of a similarity measure, suitable for describing Twitter account proximity. In this way, the paper locates accounts that share followers. Groups of Twitter accounts are located, and their common orientation is described. The analysis not only describes Twitter account similarities and group formation, but to some extent, the followers’ preferences and habits of obtaining information through Twitter, as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Government Meets Social Data)
Open AccessArticle The Use of Personal Value Estimations to Select Images for Preservation in Public Library Digital Community Collections
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 359-377; doi:10.3390/fi6020359
Received: 7 February 2014 / Revised: 23 April 2014 / Accepted: 7 May 2014 / Published: 27 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1126 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A considerable amount of information, particularly in image form, is shared on the web through social networking sites. If any of this content is worthy of preservation, who decides what is to be preserved and based on what criteria. This paper explores the
[...] Read more.
A considerable amount of information, particularly in image form, is shared on the web through social networking sites. If any of this content is worthy of preservation, who decides what is to be preserved and based on what criteria. This paper explores the potential for public libraries to assume this role of community digital repositories through the creation of digital collections. Thirty public library users and thirty librarians were solicited from the Indianapolis metropolitan area to evaluate five images selected from Flickr in terms of their value to public library digital collections and their worthiness of long-term preservation. Using a seven-point Likert scale, participants assigned a value to each image in terms of its importance to self, family and society. Participants were then asked to explain the reasoning behind their valuations. Public library users and librarians had similar value estimations of the images in the study. This is perhaps the most significant finding of the study, given the importance of collaboration and forming partnerships for building and sustaining community collections and archives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Archiving Community Memories)
Open AccessArticle Tweet My Street: A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration for the Analysis of Local Twitter Data
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 378-396; doi:10.3390/fi6020378
Received: 29 January 2014 / Revised: 18 April 2014 / Accepted: 7 May 2014 / Published: 27 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3326 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tweet My Street is a cross-disciplinary project exploring the extent to which data derived from Twitter can reveal more about spatial and temporal behaviours and the meanings attached to these locally. This is done with a longer-term view to supporting the coproduction and
[...] Read more.
Tweet My Street is a cross-disciplinary project exploring the extent to which data derived from Twitter can reveal more about spatial and temporal behaviours and the meanings attached to these locally. This is done with a longer-term view to supporting the coproduction and delivery of local services, complaint mechanisms and horizontal community support networks. The project has involved the development of a web-based software application capable of retrieving, storing and visualising geo-located “tweets” (and associated digital content) from Twitter’s Firehose. This has been piloted in Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) and has proven a scalable tool that can aid the analysis of social media data geographically. Beyond explaining efforts to analyse pilot data via this software, this paper elucidates three methodological challenges encountered during early collaboration. These include issues relating to “proximity” with subjects, ethics and critical questions about scholars’ digital responsibilities during the neogeographic turn. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
Open AccessArticle Privacy and Open Government
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 397-413; doi:10.3390/fi6020397
Received: 25 February 2014 / Revised: 3 May 2014 / Accepted: 22 May 2014 / Published: 18 June 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The public-oriented goals of the open government movement promise increased transparency and accountability of governments, enhanced citizen engagement and participation, improved service delivery, economic development and the stimulation of innovation. In part, these goals are to be achieved by making more and more
[...] Read more.
The public-oriented goals of the open government movement promise increased transparency and accountability of governments, enhanced citizen engagement and participation, improved service delivery, economic development and the stimulation of innovation. In part, these goals are to be achieved by making more and more government information public in reusable formats and under open licences. This paper identifies three broad privacy challenges raised by open government. The first is how to balance privacy with transparency and accountability in the context of “public” personal information. The second challenge flows from the disruption of traditional approaches to privacy based on a collapse of the distinctions between public and private sector actors. The third challenge is that of the potential for open government data—even if anonymized—to contribute to the big data environment in which citizens and their activities are increasingly monitored and profiled. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Government Meets Social Data)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Future Internet Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
futureinternet@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Future Internet
Back to Top