Next Article in Journal
l-Carnitine Supplementation in Recovery after Exercise
Next Article in Special Issue
Vitamin D, Hypercalciuria and Kidney Stones
Previous Article in Journal
Use of Placebo in Supplementation Studies—Vitamin D Research Illustrates an Ethical Quandary
Previous Article in Special Issue
MS Sunshine Study: Sun Exposure But Not Vitamin D Is Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Risk in Blacks and Hispanics
Article Menu
Issue 3 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030348

Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing Daily Versus Depot Vitamin D3 Therapy in 0–16-Year-Old Newly Settled Refugees in Western Australia Over a Period of 40 Weeks

1,2,†
,
3,†
,
4,5,6
,
7
,
8,9,10
,
3,11
and
3,4,5,6,12,*
1
Department of Rheumatology and Metabolic Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA 6008, Australia
2
Department of Infectious Diseases, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA 6008, Australia
3
Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6008, Australia
4
Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, WA 6160, Australia
5
School of Medical and Health Sciences & Exercise Medicine Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA 6027, Australia
6
Western Australian Bone Research Collaboration, Perth, WA 6008, Australia
7
Humanitarian Entrant Health Service, North Metropolitan Health Service, Perth, WA 6000, Australia
8
Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3052, Australia
9
Department of Paediatrics, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3168, Australia
10
Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3052, Australia
11
Refugee Health Service, Department of Paediatrics, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA 6008, Australia
12
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, PrincessMargaret Hospital for Children, Perth,WA 6008, Australia
Joint first authorship.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 February 2018 / Revised: 8 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Changing Times for Vitamin D and Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1274 KB, uploaded 16 March 2018]   |  

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in newly settled refugees in Western Australia (WA). If adherence to daily vitamin D therapy is problematic, depot therapy is a therapeutic alternative. The aim of this study was to compare daily versus depot treatment and factors influencing the therapeutic outcome. Newly settled refugees (n = 151) with 25(OH)D levels less than 78 nmol/L were randomised to receive daily or depot vitamin D therapy with eight weekly interval follow up to 40 weeks. Biochemical and clinical parameters were collected at each visit. Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) examined the longitudinal changes over time controlling for confounders including age, gender, treatment arm, season, country of refuge/origin and sun exposure score. Participants were aged 5.5 months to 16.0 years (75 males, 83 females). Both treatment groups achieved vitamin D sufficiency. The daily treatment group had significantly higher 25(OH)D levels at each visit post baseline and a higher proportion of participants with levels above 50 nmol/L at all time points. Time, treatment group, calcium and sun exposure score were significant predictors of 25(OH)D serum levels. Depot vitamin D therapy is an alternative to daily treatment in this at-risk group of children and adolescents in whom treatment adherence is problematic. View Full-Text
Keywords: depot; daily; supplementation; therapy; vitamin D; refugee; rickets depot; daily; supplementation; therapy; vitamin D; refugee; rickets
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Wadia, U.; Soon, W.; Chivers, P.; Thambiran, A.; Burgner, D.; Cherian, S.; Siafarikas, A. Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing Daily Versus Depot Vitamin D3 Therapy in 0–16-Year-Old Newly Settled Refugees in Western Australia Over a Period of 40 Weeks. Nutrients 2018, 10, 348.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top