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Computers, Volume 3, Issue 3 (September 2014), Pages 69-116

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Research

Open AccessArticle An ECMA-55 Minimal BASIC Compiler for x86-64 Linux®
Computers 2014, 3(3), 69-116; doi:10.3390/computers3030069
Received: 24 July 2014 / Revised: 17 September 2014 / Accepted: 1 October 2014 / Published: 1 October 2014
PDF Full-text (346 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This paper describes a new non-optimizing compiler for the ECMA-55 Minimal BASIC language that generates x86-64 assembler code for use on the x86-64 Linux® [1] 3.x platform. The compiler was implemented in C99 and the generated assembly language is in the AT&T style
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This paper describes a new non-optimizing compiler for the ECMA-55 Minimal BASIC language that generates x86-64 assembler code for use on the x86-64 Linux® [1] 3.x platform. The compiler was implemented in C99 and the generated assembly language is in the AT&T style and is for the GNU assembler. The generated code is stand-alone and does not require any shared libraries to run, since it makes system calls to the Linux® kernel directly. The floating point math uses the Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) instructions and the compiler fully implements all of the floating point exception handling required by the ECMA-55 standard. This compiler is designed to be small, simple, and easy to understand for people who want to study a compiler that actually implements full error checking on floating point on x86-64 CPUs even if those people have little programming experience. The generated assembly code is also designed to be simple to read. Full article
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