Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Arts, Volume 7, Issue 2 (June 2018)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Cover Story (view full-size image) Celebrated techno-art pioneer Liliane Lijn—whose participation in the landmark 1970 London [...] Read more.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-12
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle Disentangling Strategic and Opportunistic Looting: The Relationship between Antiquities Looting and Armed Conflict in Egypt
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 19 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
PDF Full-text (1167 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Antiquities are looted from archaeological sites across the world, seemingly more often in areas of armed conflict. While this is not the only context in which antiquities are looted, it is an important context and one for which much is still unknown. Previously,
[...] Read more.
Antiquities are looted from archaeological sites across the world, seemingly more often in areas of armed conflict. While this is not the only context in which antiquities are looted, it is an important context and one for which much is still unknown. Previously, the relationship between antiquities looting and armed conflict has been assessed with qualitative case studies and journalistic evidence due to a lack of systematically collected data. This study considers the relationship between antiquities looting and armed conflict in Egypt from 1997 to 2014 with a newly collected time series dataset. Autoregressive Distributed Lag Models (ARDL) with a bounds testing approach are used to assess both the overall relationship between these two phenomena and their temporal ordering. This article finds that antiquities looting and armed conflict are, indeed, statistically related; and that antiquities looting more often precedes armed conflict rather than the other way around. This finding suggests that looting is more strategic than opportunistic. Implications and future directions are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Art Crime Research (2018))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEditorial Accepting the Machine: A Response by Liliane Lijn to Three Questions from Arts
Received: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
PDF Full-text (1060 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Celebrated techno-art pioneer Liliane Lijn—whose participation in the landmark 1970 London “Kinetics” exhibition at the newly opened Hayward Gallery was but a waypoint in a long and adventurous career, and whose work is represented in the collections of Bern’s Kunstmuseum, MoMA, and Tate—has
[...] Read more.
Celebrated techno-art pioneer Liliane Lijn—whose participation in the landmark 1970 London “Kinetics” exhibition at the newly opened Hayward Gallery was but a waypoint in a long and adventurous career, and whose work is represented in the collections of Bern’s Kunstmuseum, MoMA, and Tate—has prepared this essay on the evolution of machine art in response to three questions from G.W. Smith and Juliette Bessette of Arts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Between Fakes, Forgeries, and Illicit Artifacts—Authenticity Studies in a Heritage Science Laboratory
Received: 21 March 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
PDF Full-text (3249 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since its inauguration in 1888, the Rathgen Research Laboratory of the National Museums in Berlin has been challenged by authenticity questions on cultural heritage objects. In the setting of an ever-growing market, often intertwined with the increasing global impact of illicit traffic, scientific
[...] Read more.
Since its inauguration in 1888, the Rathgen Research Laboratory of the National Museums in Berlin has been challenged by authenticity questions on cultural heritage objects. In the setting of an ever-growing market, often intertwined with the increasing global impact of illicit traffic, scientific investigations can contribute equally to art-historical, or archaeological expertise when solving questions of authenticity, and should therefore always be included when significant values are at stake. Looted or stolen artifacts, copies, fakes, and forgeries have been an intrinsic element of the market since ever, and only selectively addressed in a trans-disciplinary, more holistic way. This paper makes the case for a reliable, state-of-the-art analysis and illustrates the potential benefits of such a scientific approach to authenticity questions in selected examples: 1. the case of German art forger, Wolfgang Beltracchi; 2. brass objects of alleged Benin and Ife provenance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Art Crime Research (2018))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Researching Cultural Objects and Manuscripts in a Small Country: The Finnish Experience of Raising Awareness of Art Crime
Received: 22 March 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 29 May 2018
PDF Full-text (249 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this article we shed light on the position of Finland in conversations on the movement of unprovenanced cultural objects, within the national, the Nordic and the global contexts. Finland’s geopolitical position, as a “hard border” of the European Union neighbouring the Russian
[...] Read more.
In this article we shed light on the position of Finland in conversations on the movement of unprovenanced cultural objects, within the national, the Nordic and the global contexts. Finland’s geopolitical position, as a “hard border” of the European Union neighbouring the Russian Federation, and its current legislative provisions, which do not include import regulations, mean that it has the potential to be significant in understanding the movement of cultural property at transnational levels. In particular, we outline a recent initiative started at the University of Helsinki to kick-start a national debate on ethical working with cultural objects and manuscripts. We analyse exploratory research on current awareness and opinion within Finland, and summarize our current work to produce robust research ethics to guide scholars working in Finland. Although Finland has a small population and is usually absent from international discussions on the illicit movement of cultural property (save a few exceptions), we argue that it is still possible—and important—for scholars and others in Finland to affect policy and attitudes concerning art crime, provenance, and the role of stakeholders such as decision-makers, traders and the academy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Art Crime Research (2018))
Open AccessEssay Can Computers Create Art?
Received: 4 February 2018 / Revised: 5 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 May 2018 / Published: 10 May 2018
PDF Full-text (8081 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This essay discusses whether computers, using Artificial Intelligence (AI), could create art. First, the history of technologies that automated aspects of art is surveyed, including photography and animation. In each case, there were initial fears and denial of the technology, followed by a
[...] Read more.
This essay discusses whether computers, using Artificial Intelligence (AI), could create art. First, the history of technologies that automated aspects of art is surveyed, including photography and animation. In each case, there were initial fears and denial of the technology, followed by a blossoming of new creative and professional opportunities for artists. The current hype and reality of Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools for art making is then discussed, together with predictions about how AI tools will be used. It is then speculated about whether it could ever happen that AI systems could be credited with authorship of artwork. It is theorized that art is something created by social agents, and so computers cannot be credited with authorship of art in our current understanding. A few ways that this could change are also hypothesized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEssay D.S. Sense’s “On My Detroit Everything”: Self-Articulating Black Girl Magic
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
PDF Full-text (265 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Long before the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic was popularized on social network sites Black women in Detroit have been employing art in their processes of self-articulation and efforts to deal with the complexities and challenges of life in the city. The scripts of African American
[...] Read more.
Long before the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic was popularized on social network sites Black women in Detroit have been employing art in their processes of self-articulation and efforts to deal with the complexities and challenges of life in the city. The scripts of African American women that dominate the commercial hip hop industry and their impacts on girls and women have received thorough analysis in academia; yet, the practices, representations, and discursive articulations of independent, Black women hip hop artists remain underexplored. In particular, this essay draws on Deidre “D.S. Sense” Smith’s spoken word poem “On My Detroit Everything” to illuminate the counter-narratives and scripts that Black women have been creating to document, validate, and voice their experiences at a critical point in Detroit’s history as it underwent and continues to deal with the after effects of bankruptcy. Hip hop artists who use cultural production to accomplish grass roots community-building offer alternative visions of what it means to do political work. More than a strategy, we argue that such practices serve as the foundation for a movement that is significant and worthy of documentation in the contemporary neoliberal moment where in policies are accelerating the continued disenfranchisement of people of color in cities such as Detroit. Full article
Open AccessArticle Anime Landscapes as a Tool for Analyzing the Human–Environment Relationship: Hayao Miyazaki Films
Received: 8 March 2018 / Revised: 6 April 2018 / Accepted: 13 April 2018 / Published: 17 April 2018
PDF Full-text (568 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Common dualistic thinking in environmental design education adopts humans and the environment as separate entities, with the environment as raw material stock. This approach affects the intellectual development of landscape architects and limits their ability to create meaningful landscapes. Therefore, it is necessary
[...] Read more.
Common dualistic thinking in environmental design education adopts humans and the environment as separate entities, with the environment as raw material stock. This approach affects the intellectual development of landscape architects and limits their ability to create meaningful landscapes. Therefore, it is necessary to explore and highlight new ideas about the more integrated human–environment relationship. Through the films of Hayao Miyazaki, many audiences around the world have encountered a different worldview. By contrast with Western thinking, which adopts human superiority to nature, the worldview that Miyazaki reflects in his films depicts human as an inseparable part of nature. Being inspired by different communities and their relationship to nature in Miyazaki’s films, we propose using anime as a means of analyzing the human–environment relationship. We classified landscapes based on power relations between humans and nature. We explored how communities shape their physical environment based on how they socially construct nature and the resulting landscapes. Thus, through apocalyptic landscapes, the bitter results of exploiting nature were depicted. Wilderness landscapes reflect the bias humanity has about nature as wild and hostile. Responsible landscapes were introduced asway of understanding the unbreakable bond between humans and the environment. Through these animated landscape types, the ways landscape architecture should approach nature in professional practices was discussed, and the importance of creating responsible landscapes was emphasized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Visual Arts)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessOpinion Re: Sex-Bots—Let Us Look before We Leap
Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 10 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (172 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the understanding that a substantial commerce in sexually-enabled robots represents a plunge into the unknown for humankind, and at the “deep end of the pool”—i.e., involving one of the most important, complex, and problem-ridden aspects of human existence—it is the goal of
[...] Read more.
With the understanding that a substantial commerce in sexually-enabled robots represents a plunge into the unknown for humankind, and at the “deep end of the pool”—i.e., involving one of the most important, complex, and problem-ridden aspects of human existence—it is the goal of this brief opinion piece to help ensure that we remain aware as a society of some of the potential pitfalls—these, as is quite appropriate for an opinion piece of this kind, illustrated via negative but plausible scenarios—and presented as well in the light of the multi-dimensional aspect of human sexuality; and with the reality of a certain level of risk associated with sex-bots having been established, there are presented in conclusion some potentially strategic considerations for those professionals who find themselves involved with their design, production, and/or marketing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Art, Science and Technology of Human Sexuality)
Open AccessProject Report Paleolithic Rock Art: A Worldwide Literature Survey Extracted from the Rock Art Studies Bibliographic Database for the Years 1864–2017
Received: 23 October 2017 / Revised: 29 October 2017 / Accepted: 30 October 2017 / Published: 3 April 2018
PDF Full-text (5544 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Rock Art Studies Bibliographic Database is an open access; online resource that fulfills the need for a searchable portal into the world’s rock art literature. Geared to the broadest interests of rock art researchers; students; cultural resource managers; and the general public;
[...] Read more.
The Rock Art Studies Bibliographic Database is an open access; online resource that fulfills the need for a searchable portal into the world’s rock art literature. Geared to the broadest interests of rock art researchers; students; cultural resource managers; and the general public; the RAS database makes rock art literature accessible through a simple search interface that facilitates inquiries into multiple data fields; including authors’ names; title and publication; place-name keyword; subject keyword; ISBN/ISSN number and abstract. The results of a data search can further be sorted by any of the data fields; including: authors’ names; date; title; and so forth. An ever increasing number of citations within the database include web links to online versions of the reference cited; and many citations include full author’s abstracts. The data compilation has been undertaken by Leigh Marymor with the year 2018 marking the 25th year of continuous revision and expansion of the data. Over 37,000 citations are currently contained in the database. The RAS database first launched online as a joint project of the Bay Area Rock Art Research Association and University of California’s Bancroft Library. After thirteen years of collaboration; the project found a new home and collaborator at the Anthropology Department at the Museum of Northern Arizona. The Paleolithic Rock Art bibliography results from an export of data from the RAS database and captures a freeze-frame in the state of the rock art literature for the world’s Paleolithic rock art as compiled here in the year 2018. The online version of the RAS Bibliographic Database at the Museum of Northern Arizona is updated annually; and we refer the reader to that resource for up-to-date bibliographic data revisions and additions. Researchers who consult the online database in concert with their reference to the Paleolithic Rock Art bibliography will discover a powerful ally in further refining geographic and thematic inquiries. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Open AccessNew Book Received The Original “Cybernetic Serendipity” Special Issue of Studio International to Be Reprinted
Received: 27 March 2018 / Revised: 27 March 2018 / Accepted: 29 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
PDF Full-text (4680 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studio International (Studio International 2018), the now on-line successor to print art magazine The Studio, is planning a late April 2018 50th anniversary reprinting of its Special Issue dedicated to the historic 1968 “Cybernetic Serendipity” techno-art exhibition (Benavides 2018a)[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Ancient Artifacts vs. Digital Artifacts: New Tools for Unmasking the Sale of Illicit Antiquities on the Dark Web
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 20 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 26 March 2018
PDF Full-text (45656 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS, also known as Daesh and ISIL) in 2014, antiquities have been a widely publicized source of funding for what has become one of the most technologically savvy terrorist organizations of the
[...] Read more.
Since the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS, also known as Daesh and ISIL) in 2014, antiquities have been a widely publicized source of funding for what has become one of the most technologically savvy terrorist organizations of the modern era. The globalization of technology and rise of popularity in cryptocurrencies has changed the face of black-market trade and the actors that carry out these crimes. While art and antiquities have long served as a market with susceptibilities to laundering, the emergence of Dark Web markets, identification-masking software, and untraceable cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin have opened new doors to potential vulnerabilities. The anonymity that is offered by these technologies acts as a roadblock for authorities, while attracting the likes of terrorists and transnational criminals. Investigative research using cyber security platforms to identify digital artifacts connected to potential traffickers provides the opportunity to unmask the seemingly untraceable actors behind these activities. The evidence of illicit antiquities trafficking on the Dark Web displayed in this article can generate a new discussion on how and where to study black-market antiquities to gain needed insight into combating the illicit trade online and the transnational criminal groups it may finance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Art Crime Research (2018))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Choreographic and Somatic Approaches for the Development of Expressive Robotic Systems
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 14 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
PDF Full-text (3246 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As robotic systems are moved out of factory work cells into human-facing environments questions of choreography become central to their design, placement, and application. With a human viewer or counterpart present, a system will automatically be interpreted within context, style of movement, and
[...] Read more.
As robotic systems are moved out of factory work cells into human-facing environments questions of choreography become central to their design, placement, and application. With a human viewer or counterpart present, a system will automatically be interpreted within context, style of movement, and form factor by human beings as animate elements of their environment. The interpretation by this human counterpart is critical to the success of the system’s integration: “knobs” on the system need to make sense to a human counterpart; an artificial agent should have a way of notifying a human counterpart of a change in system state, possibly through motion profiles; and the motion of a human counterpart may have important contextual clues for task completion. Thus, professional choreographers, dance practitioners, and movement analysts are critical to research in robotics. They have design methods for movement that align with human audience perception; they can help identify simplified features of movement that will effectively accomplish human-robot interaction goals; and they have detailed knowledge of the capacity of human movement. This article provides approaches employed by one research lab, specific impacts on technical and artistic projects within, and principles that may guide future such work. The background section reports on choreography, somatic perspectives, improvisation, the Laban/Bartenieff Movement System, and robotics. From this context methods including embodied exercises, writing prompts, and community building activities have been developed to facilitate interdisciplinary research. The results of this work are presented as an overview of a smattering of projects in areas like high-level motion planning, software development for rapid prototyping of movement, artistic output, and user studies that help understand how people interpret movement. Finally, guiding principles for other groups to adopt are posited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top