Special Issue "Aircraft Design"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammad Sadraey

School of Engineering and Computer Science, Daniel Webster College, Southern New Hampshire University, 20 University Drive #109J, Nashua, NH 03063-1300, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: aircraft design; flight dynamics; UAV design; nonlinear control; robust control; systems engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This journal is devoted to reporting advancements in the science and technology associated with aircraft design through the dissemination of original archival research papers disclosing new theoretical developments and/or experimental results. The context of the journal includes fixed-wing aircraft, rotary-wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicle, remotely controlled aircraft, model aircraft, and special mission aircraft in all categories of general aviation, transport, and military. The context of the journal also includes new concepts, such as flying cars, solar-powered aircraft, air–space planes, and human-powered aircraft. All three levels of design; i.e., conceptual design, preliminary design, and detail design are considered.

The topics include design techniques, design approaches, design process, design evaluation, design metrics, design challenges, lessons learned, configuration design, design groups management, trade-off study, feasibility analysis, prioritization, revolutionary design concepts, design alternatives, legal liability, design project planning, decision making, design formulation, design requirements, design constraints, system development, system life-cycle, interaction between design and manufacturing technology, design software packages, design documentations, design standards, innovation in design, design conflicts, and design framework. Papers also are sought which review recent research developments in component design, such as wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, vertical tail, landing gear, propulsion system, control surfaces, and high lift devices.

Dr. Mohammad Sadraey
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aircraft design techniques
  • design approaches
  • design process
  • design evaluation
  • design challenges
  • configuration design
  • design groups
  • trade-off study
  • feasibility analysis
  • prioritization
  • revolutionary design concepts
  • design alternatives
  • design project planning
  • decision making
  • design formulation
  • design requirements
  • design constraints
  • system development
  • interaction between design and manufacturing technology
  • design software packages
  • design standards
  • innovation in design
  • design conflicts
  • design framework

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Bio-Inspired Flexible Flapping Wings with Elastic Deformation
Aerospace 2017, 4(3), 37; doi:10.3390/aerospace4030037
Received: 8 June 2017 / Revised: 11 July 2017 / Accepted: 13 July 2017 / Published: 15 July 2017
PDF Full-text (23784 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Over the last decades, there has been great interest in understanding the aerodynamics of flapping flight and development of flapping wing Micro Air Vehicles (FWMAVs). The camber deformation and twisting has been demonstrated quantitatively in a number of insects, but making artificial wings
[...] Read more.
Over the last decades, there has been great interest in understanding the aerodynamics of flapping flight and development of flapping wing Micro Air Vehicles (FWMAVs). The camber deformation and twisting has been demonstrated quantitatively in a number of insects, but making artificial wings that mimic those features is a challenge. This paper reports the development and characterization of artificial wings that can reproduce camber and twisting deformations. By replacing the elastic material at the wing root vein, the root vein would bend upward and inward generating an angle of attack, camber, and twisting deformations while the wing was flapping due to the aerodynamic forces acting on the wing. The flapping wing apparatus was employed to study the flexible wing kinematics and aerodynamics of real scale insect wings. Multidisciplinary experiments were conducted to provide the natural frequency, the force production, three-dimensional wing kinematics, and the effects of wing flexibility experienced by the flexible wings. The results have shown that the present artificial wing was able to mimic the two important features of insect wings: twisting and camber generation. From the force measurement, it is found that the wing with the uniform deformation showed the higher lift/power generation in the flapping wing system. The present developed artificial wing suggests a new guideline for the bio-inspired wing of the FWMAV. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aircraft Design)
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Open AccessArticle Parametric Approach to Assessing Performance of High-Lift Device Active Flow Control Architectures
Aerospace 2017, 4(1), 6; doi:10.3390/aerospace4010006
Received: 16 December 2016 / Revised: 27 January 2017 / Accepted: 3 February 2017 / Published: 10 February 2017
PDF Full-text (2736 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Active Flow Control is at present an area of considerable research, with multiple potential aircraft applications. While the majority of research has focused on the performance of the actuators themselves, a system-level perspective is necessary to assess the viability of proposed solutions. This
[...] Read more.
Active Flow Control is at present an area of considerable research, with multiple potential aircraft applications. While the majority of research has focused on the performance of the actuators themselves, a system-level perspective is necessary to assess the viability of proposed solutions. This paper demonstrates such an approach, in which major system components are sized based on system flow and redundancy considerations, with the impacts linked directly to the mission performance of the aircraft. Considering the case of a large twin-aisle aircraft, four distinct active flow control architectures that facilitate the simplification of the high-lift mechanism are investigated using the demonstrated approach. The analysis indicates a very strong influence of system total mass flow requirement on architecture performance, both for a typical mission and also over the entire payload-range envelope of the aircraft. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aircraft Design)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Climate-Compatible Air Transport System—Climate Impact Mitigation Potential for Actual and Future Aircraft
Aerospace 2016, 3(4), 38; doi:10.3390/aerospace3040038
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 17 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (31987 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Aviation guarantees mobility, but its emissions also contribute considerably to climate change. Therefore, climate impact mitigation strategies have to be developed based on comprehensive assessments of the different impacting factors. We quantify the climate impact mitigation potential and related costs resulting from changes
[...] Read more.
Aviation guarantees mobility, but its emissions also contribute considerably to climate change. Therefore, climate impact mitigation strategies have to be developed based on comprehensive assessments of the different impacting factors. We quantify the climate impact mitigation potential and related costs resulting from changes in aircraft operations and design using a multi-disciplinary model workflow. We first analyze the climate impact mitigation potential and cash operating cost changes of altered cruise altitudes and speeds for all flights globally operated by the Airbus A330-200 fleet in the year 2006. We find that this globally can lead to a 42% reduction in temperature response at a 10% cash operating cost increase. Based on this analysis, new design criteria are derived for future aircraft that are optimized for cruise conditions with reduced climate impact. The newly-optimized aircraft is re-assessed with the developed model workflow. We obtain additional climate mitigation potential with small to moderate cash operating cost changes due to the aircraft design changes of, e.g., a 32% and 54% temperature response reduction for a 0% and 10% cash operating cost increase. Hence, replacing the entire A330-200 fleet by this redesigned aircraft ( M a c r = 0.72 and initial cruise altitude (ICA) = 8000 m) could reduce the climate impact by 32% without an increase of cash operating cost. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aircraft Design)
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Open AccessArticle Numerical Investigation of Effect of Parameters on Hovering Efficiency of an Annular Lift Fan Aircraft
Aerospace 2016, 3(4), 35; doi:10.3390/aerospace3040035
Received: 14 August 2016 / Revised: 8 October 2016 / Accepted: 10 October 2016 / Published: 19 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (10538 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effects of various parameters on the hovering performance of an annular lift fan aircraft are investigated by using numerical scheme. The pitch angle, thickness, aspect ratio (chord length), number of blades, and radius of duct inlet lip are explored to optimize the
[...] Read more.
The effects of various parameters on the hovering performance of an annular lift fan aircraft are investigated by using numerical scheme. The pitch angle, thickness, aspect ratio (chord length), number of blades, and radius of duct inlet lip are explored to optimize the figure of merit. The annular lift fan is also compared with a conventional circular lift fan of the same features with the same disc loading and similar geometry. The simulation results show that the pitch angle of 27°, the thickness of 4% chord length, the aspect ratio of 3.5~4.0, 32 blades, and the radius of inlet lip of 4.7% generate the maximum figure of merit of 0.733. The optimized configuration can be used for further studies of the annular lift fan aircraft. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aircraft Design)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Constructal Theory and Aeroelastic Design of Flexible Flying Wing Aircraft
Aerospace 2017, 4(3), 35; doi:10.3390/aerospace4030035
Received: 1 May 2017 / Revised: 12 June 2017 / Accepted: 21 June 2017 / Published: 7 July 2017
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Abstract
The aeroelastic behavior of high-aspect-ratio very flexible flying wing is highly affected by the geometric nonlinearities of the aircraft structure. This paper reviews the findings on how these nonlinearities influence the structural and flight dynamics, and it shows that the aeroelastic flight envelope
[...] Read more.
The aeroelastic behavior of high-aspect-ratio very flexible flying wing is highly affected by the geometric nonlinearities of the aircraft structure. This paper reviews the findings on how these nonlinearities influence the structural and flight dynamics, and it shows that the aeroelastic flight envelope could significantly be extended with proper choices of design parameters such as engine placement. Moreover, in order to investigate the physics behind the effects of design parameters, constructal theory of design is reviewed. The constructal theory advances the philosophy of design as science, it states that the better structural design emerges when stress flow strangulation is avoided. Furthermore, it shows that airplanes, through their evolution, have obeyed theoretical allometric rules that unite their designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aircraft Design)
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