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Special Issue "Palatability of Pet Food"

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A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Edgar Chambers IV

Distinguished Professor and Director, Sensory Analysis Center, Ice Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sensory quality; consumer acceptance; health aspects; product development; shelf-life; quality control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pets are a key part of the lives of many people around the world. Helping them lead happy, healthy lives is the responsibility of both owners and manufacturers of pet products. Food is a key aspect of pet care and ensuring that pet foods are not only healthful, but desirable to companion animals and to their owners is essential.

This special issue will revolve around any aspect pertaining to the science of pet food palatability. Authors are encouraged to submit papers on acceptance and sensory quality of pet food based on both animal and human studies. Papers expanding methodological knowledge are of particular interest. Review papers are welcome, but writers of review articles should contact the guest editor to discuss topics.

We look forward to producing an internationally-important seminal issue on pet food palatability.

Prof. Dr. Edgar Chambers IV
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 600 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • pet food
  • palatability
  • sensory
  • acceptance
  • companion animals

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle The Effects of Fiber Inclusion on Pet Food Sensory Characteristics and Palatability
Animals 2015, 5(1), 110-125; doi:10.3390/ani5010110
Received: 1 December 2014 / Revised: 29 January 2015 / Accepted: 5 February 2015 / Published: 16 February 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (14398 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to determine (a) the influence of fiber on the sensory characteristics of dry dog foods; (b) differences of coated and uncoated kibbles for aroma and flavor characteristics; (c) palatability of these dry dog foods; and (d) potential
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The objectives of this study were to determine (a) the influence of fiber on the sensory characteristics of dry dog foods; (b) differences of coated and uncoated kibbles for aroma and flavor characteristics; (c) palatability of these dry dog foods; and (d) potential associations between palatability and sensory attributes. A total of eight fiber treatments were manufactured: a control (no fiber addition), guava fiber (3%, 6%, and 12%), sugar cane fiber (9%; large and small particle size), and wheat bran fiber (32%; large and small particle size). The results indicated significant effects of fibers on both flavor and texture properties of the samples. Bitter taste and iron and stale aftertaste were examples of flavor attributes that differed with treatment, with highest intensity observed for 12% guava fiber and small particle size sugar cane fiber treatments. Fracturability and initial crispness attributes were lowest for the sugar cane fiber treatments. Flavor of all treatments changed after coating with a palatant, increasing in toasted, brothy, and grainy attributes. The coating also had a masking effect on aroma attributes such as stale, flavor attributes such as iron and bitter taste, and appearance attributes such as porosity. Palatability testing results indicated that the control treatment was preferred over the sugar cane or the wheat bran treatment. The treatment with large sugarcane fiber particles was preferred over the treatment with small particles, while both of the wheat bran treatments were eaten at a similar level. Descriptive sensory analysis data, especially textural attributes, were useful in pinpointing the underlying characteristics and were considered to be reasons that may influence palatability of dog foods manufactured with inclusion of different fibers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Palatability of Pet Food)
Open AccessArticle Consumer Acceptance of Dry Dog Food Variations
Animals 2014, 4(2), 313-330; doi:10.3390/ani4020313
Received: 14 April 2014 / Revised: 6 June 2014 / Accepted: 6 June 2014 / Published: 16 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (143 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Eight dry dog food samples available in the US
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The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Eight dry dog food samples available in the US market were evaluated by pet owners. In this study, consumers evaluated overall liking, aroma, and appearance liking of the products. Consumers were also asked to predict their purchase intent, their dog’s liking, and cost of the samples. The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner’s overall liking more than the aroma of the product. Overall liking clusters were not related to income, age, gender, or education, indicating that general consumer demographics do not appear to play a main role in individual consumer acceptance of dog food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Palatability of Pet Food)
Open AccessArticle The Effects of Cooking Process and Meat Inclusion on Pet Food Flavor and Texture Characteristics
Animals 2014, 4(2), 254-271; doi:10.3390/ani4020254
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 20 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 23 May 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (152 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The pet food industry is an important portion of the food and feed industries in the US. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine cooking method (baking or extrusion), meat inclusion (0 or 20%), and extrusion thermal to mechanical energy ratios
[...] Read more.
The pet food industry is an important portion of the food and feed industries in the US. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine cooking method (baking or extrusion), meat inclusion (0 or 20%), and extrusion thermal to mechanical energy ratios (low, medium, and high) effects on sensory and volatile properties of pet foods, and (2) to determine associations among sensory and volatile characteristics of baked and extruded pet foods. Descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the pet food samples. It was found that baked samples were lighter in color (2.0–2.6 baked vs. 3.5–4.3 extruded, color intensity scale 0–15), and had lower levels of attributes that indicated rancidity (i.e., fishy flavor; 0.3–0.6 baked, 0.6–1.5 extruded, scale 0–15), whereas extruded pet foods were more cohesive in mass, more friable, hard, and crisp, but less powdery than baked samples. Fresh meat inclusion tended to decrease bitterness and increase fishy flavor and cohesiveness of pet foods. High thermal to mechanical energy ratio during extrusion resulted in less musty and more porous kibbles. The main volatile compounds included aldehydes, such as hexanal and heptanal, ketones, and alcohols. Extruded samples did not contain methylpyrazine, while baked samples did not contain 2-butyl furan. Future studies should consider evaluating the relationship between sensory results and animal palatability for these types of foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Palatability of Pet Food)

Review

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Open AccessReview Assessing Food Preferences in Dogs and Cats: A Review of the Current Methods
Animals 2015, 5(1), 126-137; doi:10.3390/ani5010126
Received: 15 December 2014 / Accepted: 6 March 2015 / Published: 18 March 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1136 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Food is a major aspect of pet care; therefore, ensuring that pet foods are not only healthful but attractive to companion animals and their owners is essential. The petfood market remains active and requires ongoing evaluation of the adaptation and efficiency of the
[...] Read more.
Food is a major aspect of pet care; therefore, ensuring that pet foods are not only healthful but attractive to companion animals and their owners is essential. The petfood market remains active and requires ongoing evaluation of the adaptation and efficiency of the new products. Palatability—foods’ characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption—is therefore a key element to look at. Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products. Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Palatability of Pet Food)
Open AccessReview Pet Food Palatability Evaluation: A Review of Standard Assay Techniques and Interpretation of Results with a Primary Focus on Limitations
Animals 2015, 5(1), 43-55; doi:10.3390/ani5010043
Received: 1 December 2014 / Accepted: 9 January 2015 / Published: 16 January 2015
PDF Full-text (190 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The pet food industry continues to grow steadily as a result of new innovative products. Quality control and product development tests for pet foods are typically conducted through palatability testing with dogs and cats. Palatability is the measure of intake of a food
[...] Read more.
The pet food industry continues to grow steadily as a result of new innovative products. Quality control and product development tests for pet foods are typically conducted through palatability testing with dogs and cats. Palatability is the measure of intake of a food that indicates acceptance or the measure of preference of one food over another. Pet food palatability is most commonly measured using a single-bowl or a two-bowl assay. While these tests answer some questions about the animals’ perception of the food, there are many limitations as well. This review addresses some of these limitations and indicates opportunities for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Palatability of Pet Food)

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