Special Issue "Intracellular Innate Immunity of Antibodies"

A special issue of Antibodies (ISSN 2073-4468).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Nathalie Scholler

SRI International Biosciences Division, Cancer and Metabolism Center, #100-51, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: study of B-cell response to tumors and B-cell interactions with innate immunity in the tumor microenvironment; development and evaluation of affinity reagents for diagnostic and targeted-imaging of cancer and therapy for ovarian cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The immune system provides critical protection against pathogens, both through the adaptive immune system, which is highly specific and endowed of memory but slow to develop on first exposure, and the innate immune system, which can immediately sense any intracellular pathogens through the recognition of molecular patterns associated with pathogens (PAMPs) or damaged cells (DAMPs, danger signals, or alarmins) by germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Cell single sensing can elicit multiple immune responses to efficiently reduce spreading infection. Adaptive immune responses are carried out by activated B and T cells, which produce antigen-specific antibodies or cytotoxic T cells, respectively. Antibodies that patrol the extracellular spaces bind to pathogens, which directly inactivate pathogen functions or prime them for destruction by complement (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, CDC) or phagocytosis (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, ADCC). In addition to these mechanisms, antibodies also activate intracellular innate immunity when they are carried in the cell during pathogen entry. Once in the cell, pathogen-attached antibodies bind to a cytosolic antibody receptor (Tripartite motif-containing 21, TRIM21) that mediates antibody-dependent intracellular neutralization (ADIN). While ADIN has only been observed to act against adenovirus thus far, it is likely to also be effective against other pathogens. This Special Issue of Antibodies focuses on intracellular innate immunity of antibodies, with specific emphasis on different pathogenic mechanisms, potential therapeutic options and critical information that can be derived from the study of intracellular innate immunity.

Dr. Nathalie Scholler
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibodies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • PAMPs
  • DAMPs
  • PRR
  • TRIM21
  • ADIN
  • RIG-I
  • MDA5 NF-κB
  • AP-1 and IRF signaling pathways

 

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Surveillance for Intracellular Antibody by Cytosolic Fc Receptor TRIM21
Antibodies 2016, 5(4), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/antib5040021
Received: 11 June 2016 / Revised: 1 August 2016 / Accepted: 9 August 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1047 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
TRIM21 has emerged as an atypical Fc receptor that is broadly conserved and widely expressed in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Viruses that traffic surface-bound antibodies into the cell during infection recruit TRIM21 via a high affinity interaction between Fc and TRIM21 PRYSPRY
[...] Read more.
TRIM21 has emerged as an atypical Fc receptor that is broadly conserved and widely expressed in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Viruses that traffic surface-bound antibodies into the cell during infection recruit TRIM21 via a high affinity interaction between Fc and TRIM21 PRYSPRY domain. Following binding of intracellular antibody, TRIM21 acts as both antiviral effector and sensor for innate immune signalling. These activities serve to reduce viral replication by orders of magnitude in vitro and contribute to host survival during in vivo infection. Neutralization occurs rapidly after detection and requires the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The microbial targets of this arm of intracellular immunity are still being identified: TRIM21 activity has been reported following infection by several non-enveloped viruses and intracellular bacteria. These findings extend the sphere of influence of antibodies to the intracellular domain and have broad implications for immunity. TRIM21 has been implicated in the chronic auto-immune condition systemic lupus erythematosus and is itself an auto-antigen in Sjögren’s syndrome. This review summarises our current understanding of TRIM21’s role as a cytosolic Fc receptor and briefly discusses pathological circumstances where intracellular antibodies have been described, or are hypothesized to occur, and may benefit from further investigations of the role of TRIM21. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intracellular Innate Immunity of Antibodies)
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Open AccessReview Epigenetic Regulation of Innate Immunity by microRNAs
Antibodies 2016, 5(2), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/antib5020008
Received: 17 December 2015 / Revised: 16 March 2016 / Accepted: 16 March 2016 / Published: 1 April 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (733 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The innate immune response, which is usually referred to as the first line of defense, protects the hosts against pathogenic micro-organisms. Some of the biomolecules released from the pathogens, such as proteins, lipoproteins and nucleic acids, which are collectively termed as pathogen-associated molecular
[...] Read more.
The innate immune response, which is usually referred to as the first line of defense, protects the hosts against pathogenic micro-organisms. Some of the biomolecules released from the pathogens, such as proteins, lipoproteins and nucleic acids, which are collectively termed as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), elicit signaling mechanisms that trigger immune responses in the hosts. Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) on the host cells recognize these PAMPs and initiate intracellular signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), and other pathways which induce production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons. Recently, different members of tripartite motif containing proteins (TRIM) family of proteins were identified to intercept and regulate these cellular pathways. Specific targets of TRIM proteins have been identified and their molecular mechanisms were unraveled and identified unique domains involved in protein-protein interactions. Though innate immunity represents a tight and well conserved immune system in the host, gene expression in innate immunity was identified to be influenced by several epigenetic mechanisms including regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review, we present critical analysis of the findings on the identification of specific miRNAs that modulate expression of target genes involved in the regulation of innate immunity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intracellular Innate Immunity of Antibodies)
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