Special Issue "Breast Cancer Biology and Treatment"

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A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Tomoharu Sugie

Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, 2-3-1 Shinmachi, Hirakata, 573-1191 Osaka, Japan
Fax: +81 72 804 2578
Interests: breast surgery; cancer immunology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast cancer is a world-wide, common malignant disease. In the last decade, researchers have demonstrated that breast cancer is highly heterogeneous. Intrinsic subtypes, i.e., categories of breast cancer with different gene expression profiles have distinct biological behaviors and responses to therapy. This novel classification, which does not represent pathological morphology nor tumor burden, has enabled us to understand that breast cancer is not one disease; personalized therapy based on each subtype may be critical. In this special issue of Cancers, we invite research and review articles that discuss clinical features, cancer biology, and the current management of, and future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for, breast cancer.

Dr. Tomoharu Sugie
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • cancer biology
  • intrinsic subtype
  • local management
  • personalized therapy
  • clinical feature

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Simultaneous Expression of Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties and Cancer-Associated Fibroblast-Like Properties in a Primary Culture of Breast Cancer Cells
Cancers 2014, 6(3), 1570-1578; doi:10.3390/cancers6031570
Received: 3 April 2014 / Revised: 16 June 2014 / Accepted: 22 July 2014 / Published: 31 July 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (363 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The importance of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in cancer biology has been recently highlighted owing to their critical roles in cancer growth, progression, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. We have previously established a primary culture of breast cancer cells, which showed epithelial-mesenchymal transition and [...] Read more.
The importance of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in cancer biology has been recently highlighted owing to their critical roles in cancer growth, progression, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. We have previously established a primary culture of breast cancer cells, which showed epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell-like properties. In this study, we found that the primary culture also showed CAF-like properties. For example, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) and its downstream genes, nuclear factor-kappa B2 (NF-κB2) and BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kd-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), and many enzymes involved in glycolysis, such as GAPDH, LDH, PGAM1, and PKM2, were highly overexpressed in the primary culture. Moreover, media conditioned with the primary culture cells enhanced the growth of breast cancer cells. Similar to previous CAF studies, this enhancement suggested to be occurred through fibroblast growth factor signaling. This MCKH primary culture cell, which showed simultaneous expression of tumorigenic and CAF properties, offers a unique experimental system for studying the biology of CAFs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancer Biology and Treatment)
Open AccessArticle Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations
Cancers 2014, 6(3), 1351-1362; doi:10.3390/cancers6031351
Received: 21 April 2014 / Revised: 27 May 2014 / Accepted: 19 June 2014 / Published: 27 June 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (734 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the [...] Read more.
Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001) and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01), but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72) or overall survival (p = 0.93). Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancer Biology and Treatment)

Review

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Open AccessReview The Roles of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer
Cancers 2015, 7(2), 598-616; doi:10.3390/cancers7020598
Received: 23 July 2014 / Revised: 27 March 2015 / Accepted: 30 March 2015 / Published: 9 April 2015
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (522 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis [...] Read more.
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis and that aberrant expression levels of miRNAs are associated with the onset of many diseases, including cancer. In various cancers, miRNAs play important roles in tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies reported that miRNAs could also be secreted via small endosome-derived vesicles called exosomes, which are derived from multiple cell types, including dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication and have been investigated as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the major findings related to the functions of miRNAs in breast cancer, which is the most frequent cancer in women, and discuss the potential clinical uses of miRNAs, including their roles as therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancer Biology and Treatment)
Open AccessReview Standard of Care and Promising New Agents for Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer
Cancers 2014, 6(4), 2187-2223; doi:10.3390/cancers6042187
Received: 5 May 2014 / Revised: 5 September 2014 / Accepted: 26 September 2014 / Published: 24 October 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (757 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a cluster of heterogeneous diseases, all of them sharing the lack of expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 protein. They are characterized by different biological, molecular and clinical features, including a poor prognosis despite [...] Read more.
Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a cluster of heterogeneous diseases, all of them sharing the lack of expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 protein. They are characterized by different biological, molecular and clinical features, including a poor prognosis despite the increased sensitivity to the current cytotoxic therapies. Several studies have identified important molecular features which enable further subdivision of this type of tumor. We are drawing from genomics, transcription and translation analysis at different levels, to improve our knowledge of the molecular alterations along the pathways which are activated during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. How this information should be used for the rational selection of therapy is an ongoing challenge and the subject of numerous research studies in progress. Currently, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), HSP90 and Aurora inhibitors are most used as targeting agents in metastatic setting clinical trials. In this paper we will review the current knowledge about the genetic subtypes of TNBC and their different responses to conventional therapeutic strategies, as well as to some new promising molecular target agents, aimed to achieve more tailored therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancer Biology and Treatment)

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