Special Issue "Breast Cancers: Pathology and Biomarkers"

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A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Sandip Kumar SenGupta

Department of Pathology & Molecular Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston K7L 3N6, Canada
E-Mail
Fax: +1 613 548 6076
Interests: breast cancer pathology; immunohistochemistry; prognostic and predictive factors; biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A major challenge in the clinical management of breast cancer is the accurate prognostication of clinical outcome and reliable prediction of which subgroups of patients will benefit (or not) from systemic treatment. Basic discoveries in cancer biology have identified key signaling pathways that drive malignant progression in breast cancer, and panels of bio-markers that assess their activation.  Recently, gene expression profiling has led to the discovery of molecular biomarker sets that define breast cancer subtypes which are associated with different prognoses and are correlated with previously identified clinical bio-markers.  In addition, distinct molecularly defined classes of tumor stroma have been associated with tumor subtypes, and have been found to enhance prognostic power. Mutational analysis and micro-RNA profiling also provide new dimensions for prognosis and prediction of treatment response. Through this special issue of Cancers dedicated towards breast cancer pathology and biomarkers, we are pleased to accept manuscripts for publication which will move us forward in our collective goal of providing optimal, personalized medical care for patients with breast cancer.

Prof. Dr. Sandip Kumar SenGupta
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • breast pathology
  • immunohistochemistry
  • predictive markers
  • prognostic markers
  • breast cancer
  • personalized medicine
  • micro RNA
  • signaling pathways
  • gene expression profiling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Clinical Significance of CK19 Negative Breast Cancer
Cancers 2013, 5(1), 1-11; doi:10.3390/cancers5010001
Received: 5 November 2012 / Revised: 17 December 2012 / Accepted: 19 December 2012 / Published: 21 December 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (608 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) is gaining widespread use as a quick and accurate method. This assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) which is present in some but not all breast
[...] Read more.
Analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) is gaining widespread use as a quick and accurate method. This assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) which is present in some but not all breast tumors. In this study, the clinical significance of negative CK19 was investigated in 219 cases of primary breast cancer. In 179 patients with clinically negative nodes, OSNA and imprint smear cytology of SLN were performed simultaneously. The OSNA revealed a node-positive rate of 24.6%. Negative CK19 correlated significantly with negative ER/PgR and higher Ki-67 values, and marginally with higher nuclear grade and p53 overexpression. The triple negative subtype showed lower CK19 expression. OSNA revealed that one of the negative CK19 cases was actually a false negative but this was corrected with the use of the imprint smear cytology. In conclusion, CK19 negativity reflected the aggressiveness of primary breast cancer. OSNA assay used to analyze SLN was useful, but there is a possibility that it will mistakenly detect false negatives in CK19 negative tumors. Therefore, in tumors with negative CK19, the imprint smear cytology may be more useful in cases with macrometastasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancers: Pathology and Biomarkers)
Open AccessArticle Association of Differentiation-Related Gene-1 (DRG1) with Breast Cancer Survival and in Vitro Impact of DRG1 Suppression
Cancers 2012, 4(3), 658-672; doi:10.3390/cancers4030658
Received: 6 June 2012 / Revised: 29 June 2012 / Accepted: 5 July 2012 / Published: 10 July 2012
PDF Full-text (486 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Differentiation-related gene-1, DRG1, is a metastasis suppressor gene whose expression has been shown to be dysregulated in a number of malignancies. The current study examines the expression of DRG1 in a clinical breast cohort and its association with a number of clinical pathological
[...] Read more.
Differentiation-related gene-1, DRG1, is a metastasis suppressor gene whose expression has been shown to be dysregulated in a number of malignancies. The current study examines the expression of DRG1 in a clinical breast cohort and its association with a number of clinical pathological factors using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, DRG1 expression is targeted in vitro using ribozyme transgene technology to explore the function of DRG1 in two human breast cancer cell lines. Low levels of DRG1 were found in patients who developed metastasis (p = 0.036) and who died of breast cancer (p = 0.0048) compared to disease free patients. Knockdown of DRG1 also resulted in significantly increased invasion and motility, but decreased matrix-adhesion in MCF7 cells. Knockdown of DRG1 seemed to have minimal impact on the cellular functions of the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line causing no significant differences in cell growth, invasion, motility or matrix-adhesion. Thus, DRG1 appears to be linked to development of metastasis and death in patients who died as a result of breast cancer and may be useful as a prognostic factor as its knockdown appears to be linked with increased invasion and motility and decreased adhesion in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancers: Pathology and Biomarkers)

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