Special Issue "Globalization and Inequality"

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A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Devashish Mitra (Website)

The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA
Phone: +1 315 443 6143
Interests: international trade; political economy; development economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The special issue will cover the impact on inequality of all aspects of economic globalization, such as international trade (including offshoring), and international mobility of labor and capital. A broad view of inequality will be taken in that papers on the impact of globalization on general income inequality, wage inequality, employment and unemployment and the quality of employment will be eligible for consideration. We welcome the submission of articles based on original theoretical and/or empirical research, analytical survey papers and policy-oriented think pieces.

Prof. Dr. Devashish Mitra
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Economies is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Redistribution of Trade Gains When Income Inequality Matters
Economies 2015, 3(4), 186-215; doi:10.3390/economies3040186
Received: 29 June 2015 / Revised: 5 October 2015 / Accepted: 16 October 2015 / Published: 28 October 2015
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Abstract
How does a redistribution of trade gains affect welfare when income inequality matters? To answer this question, we extend the [1] model to unionized labor markets and heterogeneous workers. As redistribution schemes, we consider unemployment benefits that are financed either by a [...] Read more.
How does a redistribution of trade gains affect welfare when income inequality matters? To answer this question, we extend the [1] model to unionized labor markets and heterogeneous workers. As redistribution schemes, we consider unemployment benefits that are financed either by a wage tax, a payroll tax or a profit tax. Assuming that welfare declines in income inequality, we find that welfare increases up to a maximum in the case of wage tax funding, while welfare declines weakly (sharply) if a profit tax (payroll tax) is implemented. These effects are caused by the wage tax neutrality (due to union wage setting) and by a profit tax-induced decline in long-term unemployment. As a result, the government’s optimal redistribution scheme is to finance unemployment benefits by a wage tax. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Globalization and Inequality)
Open AccessArticle How Offshoring Can Affect the Industries’ Skill Composition
Economies 2015, 3(2), 72-99; doi:10.3390/economies3020072
Received: 6 February 2014 / Revised: 5 May 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 15 May 2015
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Abstract
While most of the offshoring literature focuses on the effects on relative wages, other implications do not receive the necessary attention. This paper investigates the effects on the industries’ skill ratio. It summarizes the empirical literature, discusses theoretical findings, and provides empirical [...] Read more.
While most of the offshoring literature focuses on the effects on relative wages, other implications do not receive the necessary attention. This paper investigates the effects on the industries’ skill ratio. It summarizes the empirical literature, discusses theoretical findings, and provides empirical evidence for Germany. As results show, effects are mainly driven by the industry where offshoring takes place. If offshoring takes place in high-skill intensive industries, the high-skill labor ratio increases (vice versa if offshoring takes place in low-skill intensive industries). Results are in line with other empirical findings, however, they seem to contradict theoretical causalities. Thus, we additionally discuss possible explanations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Globalization and Inequality)

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