Special Issue "Long-Run Economic Impacts of International Migration"

A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jacques Poot

National Institute of Demographic and Economic Analysis (NIDEA), University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Persistent differences between countries in the standard of living, intensifying global economic integration and declining costs of travel and communication have all been contributing to growing international migration in recent decades. A large literature has emerged on the socio-economic consequences of this trend for migrant-sending and migrant-receiving countries. Much of this literature focuses on short-term economic impacts, such as on labor and housing markets, international trade flows, remittances, public services and taxation. A stronger focus on longer term economic impacts is therefore now desirable. Economies invites papers that provide new insights into such long-run economic impacts of international migration. These can take a host country, a sending country, or a global perspective. Authors of the Special Issue are invited to address one of a range of potential research questions. These would include the effects of international migration on:

  • Long-run global demographic trends (population size, composition and distribution)
  • Long-run economic growth and wellbeing
  • Human capital accumulation
  • Research and development (R&D), innovation, technological change and total factor productivity growth
  • Economies of scale, agglomeration and the spatial distribution of economic activity
  • Business investment and entrepreneurship
  • Public and private infrastructure
  • International economic relations and diaspora networks
  • Private and public savings, and intergenerational transfers
  • Economic restructuring and transformation
  • International convergence or divergence
  • Cultural diversity, social capital and social cohesion
  • Natural resources and the environment

Prof. Dr. Jacques Poot
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Nonlinear Effects of Remittances on Per Capita GDP Growth in Bangladesh
Economies 2017, 5(3), 25; doi:10.3390/economies5030025
Received: 20 July 2016 / Revised: 29 June 2017 / Accepted: 8 July 2017 / Published: 17 July 2017
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Abstract
This paper examines the impact of inward remittances flows on per capita gross domestic product (GDP) growth in Bangladesh during 1976–2012. We find that the growth effect of remittances is negative at first but becomes positive at a later stage, evidence of a
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This paper examines the impact of inward remittances flows on per capita gross domestic product (GDP) growth in Bangladesh during 1976–2012. We find that the growth effect of remittances is negative at first but becomes positive at a later stage, evidence of a non-linear relationship. Unproductive use of remittances was rampant in the beginning when they were received by migrant families, but better social and economic investments led to more productive utilization of remittances receipts at later periods. This suggests a U-shaped relationship between remittances and per capita GDP growth. Unlike what is suggested in the literature, that the effect of remittances is more pronounced in a less financially developed economy, our evidence does not show that the effect of remittances on per capita GDP growth in Bangladesh is conditional on the level of financial development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long-Run Economic Impacts of International Migration)
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Open AccessArticle Remittances, Development Level, and Long-Run Economic Growth
Economies 2016, 4(4), 28; doi:10.3390/economies4040028
Received: 13 June 2016 / Revised: 1 November 2016 / Accepted: 22 November 2016 / Published: 1 December 2016
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Abstract
This paper seeks to enrich the field of research on the topic of the impact of remittances on long-run economic growth. Using an unbalanced panel data covering a sample of 116 countries with different development levels over the period 1990–2014, we studied the
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This paper seeks to enrich the field of research on the topic of the impact of remittances on long-run economic growth. Using an unbalanced panel data covering a sample of 116 countries with different development levels over the period 1990–2014, we studied the interaction between remittances and the level of economic development, as well as its impact on long-run economic growth—because the impact of remittances could be influenced by the development level of the receiving countries. In parallel, we explored the hypothesis about diminishing a country’s capacity to use remittances for promoting long-run economic growth as the abundance of remittances increases. To control the endogeneity while estimating the impact of remittances on long-run economic growth, we used OLS (ordinary least squares) with FD (first differences) transformation and FE (fixed effects) approaches and other controls of long-run growth. Our results showed that in general remittances have a positive impact on long-run economic growth, but the impact differs based on the country’s economic development level and the abundance of remittances in the economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long-Run Economic Impacts of International Migration)
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Open AccessArticle The Impact of Possible Migration Scenarios after ‘Brexit’ on the State Pension System
Economies 2016, 4(4), 23; doi:10.3390/economies4040023
Received: 12 July 2016 / Revised: 29 September 2016 / Accepted: 18 October 2016 / Published: 25 October 2016
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Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to explore the impacts of changes in migration flows—in particular, those resulting from possible migration policy changes after a UK exit (‘Brexit’) from the European Union (EU)—on the finances of the UK state pension system. We find
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The purpose of this paper is to explore the impacts of changes in migration flows—in particular, those resulting from possible migration policy changes after a UK exit (‘Brexit’) from the European Union (EU)—on the finances of the UK state pension system. We find that the aggregate effects of considered shocks to immigration associated with Brexit on the funding of UK state pensions are dwarfed by associated uncertainties, and by coincident cost increases due to population aging and (domestic) pension’s policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long-Run Economic Impacts of International Migration)
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Open AccessArticle Why Migrate: For Study or for Work?
Economies 2016, 4(3), 17; doi:10.3390/economies4030017
Received: 16 November 2015 / Revised: 4 August 2016 / Accepted: 5 August 2016 / Published: 17 August 2016
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Abstract
Over the past decades, globalization has led to a huge increase in the migration of workers, as well as students. This paper develops a simple two-step model that describes the decisions of an individual vis-à-vis education and migration, and presents a unified model,
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Over the past decades, globalization has led to a huge increase in the migration of workers, as well as students. This paper develops a simple two-step model that describes the decisions of an individual vis-à-vis education and migration, and presents a unified model, wherein the two migration decisions are combined into a single, unique model. This paper shows that under the plausible assumption that costs of migration differ over the human life cycle, the usual brain drain strategy is sub-optimal. With an increase in globalization, the brain drain strategy will be replaced by the strategy of migration of students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long-Run Economic Impacts of International Migration)
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Open AccessArticle The Formation of Immigrant Networks in the Short and the Long Run
Economies 2016, 4(3), 15; doi:10.3390/economies4030015
Received: 16 November 2015 / Revised: 18 July 2016 / Accepted: 27 July 2016 / Published: 30 July 2016
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Abstract
In this paper, we present a formal framework of possible network formations among immigrants. After arriving in the new country, one of the new immigrant’s important decisions is with whom to maintain a link in the foreign country. We find that the behavior
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In this paper, we present a formal framework of possible network formations among immigrants. After arriving in the new country, one of the new immigrant’s important decisions is with whom to maintain a link in the foreign country. We find that the behavior of the first two immigrants affects all those who come after them. We also find that in the long run, under specific conditions, the first immigrant will become the leader of the immigrant society. Over time, as the stock of immigrants in the host country increases, the investment in the link with the leader will increase as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long-Run Economic Impacts of International Migration)
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