Special Issue "Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Otto Hänninen

1) National Institute for Health and Welfare, Environmental Health, POB 95, FI-70701Kuopio, Finland 2) Faculty of Sciences and Forestry, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland
Phone: +358 29 524 6471
Fax: +358 29 524 6499
Interests: exposure and risk assessment; epidemiology; aerosol modelling; ultrafine and fine particles; ambient air quality; infiltration; indoor air pollution; lung deposition; source apportionment and particle composition; intake fraction; life cycle assessment; environmental burden of disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultrafine particles have special physical and chemical properties that affect their behaviour in the environment and entry to the human body. Ambient particles are estimated to be the leading hazard to human health globally—also in developed countries with lower environmental levels than in many places in the developing world—but the higher number concentration and particle surface area have been suggested to increase the health risks from ultrafines. However, the toxicological evidence has not yet been fully established in human studies.

The Special Issue of IJERPH on Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects aims at presenting the state of art in understanding the risks of nanosized ultrafine particles on human health. This issue welcomes papers on exposure analysis, epidemiology, toxicology and risk assessment focusing specifically on the processes affecting hazards of ultrafine particles for human health. The main interest is in environmental exposures, but also occupational settings may be considered in special cases. The issue also welcomes novel approaches for risk management including both indoor and outdoor sources and exposures. Application of novel monitoring methods like miniature sized personal monitors and estimates of particle surface area and microenvironmental particle size distributions, including dynamic aerosol processes, are warmly welcome. This special issue represents an effort to capture current developments in the field and provide a forum for cutting edge contributions to the literature.

Dr. Otto Hänninen
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Published Papers (8 papers)

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Displaying article 1-8
p. 1667-1686
by , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(2), 1667-1686; doi:10.3390/ijerph120201667
Received: 29 August 2014 / Revised: 12 November 2014 / Accepted: 23 January 2015 / Published: 2 February 2015
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (753 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
p. 1687-1702
by , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(2), 1687-1702; doi:10.3390/ijerph120201687
Received: 30 July 2014 / Accepted: 13 January 2015 / Published: 2 February 2015
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (701 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
p. 11286-11307
by , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 11286-11307; doi:10.3390/ijerph111111286
Received: 21 March 2014 / Revised: 8 October 2014 / Accepted: 17 October 2014 / Published: 30 October 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (944 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
p. 10641-10662
by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(10), 10641-10662; doi:10.3390/ijerph111010641
Received: 30 July 2014 / Revised: 24 September 2014 / Accepted: 8 October 2014 / Published: 15 October 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
p. 9621-9637
by ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(9), 9621-9637; doi:10.3390/ijerph110909621
Received: 16 May 2014 / Revised: 1 September 2014 / Accepted: 5 September 2014 / Published: 16 September 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
p. 8867-8890
by , , , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(9), 8867-8890; doi:10.3390/ijerph110908867
Received: 30 April 2014 / Revised: 8 July 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 28 August 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
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p. 5382-5402
by , , , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(5), 5382-5402; doi:10.3390/ijerph110505382
Received: 13 March 2014 / Revised: 4 May 2014 / Accepted: 8 May 2014 / Published: 16 May 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1096 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
abstract graphic
p. 4026-4048
by ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(4), 4026-4048; doi:10.3390/ijerph110404026
Received: 18 February 2014 / Revised: 2 April 2014 / Accepted: 2 April 2014 / Published: 14 April 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (919 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafine Particles and Potential Health Effects)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Environmental exposure to ultrafine particles inside and nearby a military airport.
Authors: Campagna M1, Frattolillo A2, Pili S1, Marcias G1, Angius N1, Mastino CC2, Cocco P1, Buonanno G3
Affiliations: 1 Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health, University of Cagliari
2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari
3 Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio
Abstract: Airport activities can contribute to the emission of ultrafine particles (UFP) in the environment. Aim of our study is to assess the airborne levels of UFP in a military airport and in the surrounding area and to compare such levels to those generated by other anthropic sources. Four outdoor air samplings were carried out inside a military airport during flight activities, twelve nearby the military airport, five in an urban area, and one in a rural area. We used a portable Electrical Low Pressure Impactor to detect the UFP concentration, mass and surface area. Particles were chemically analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Inside the military airport, we observed an inverse correlation with distance from flight activities. The median UFP count ranged 3,743-28,949 particles/cm3, and the highest UFP count was 4,014,052 particles/cm3 (during the taxi and take-off activities). Nearby the airport, UFP number, mass and surface area were more elevated in the winter season and we did not observe a correlation with flight activities. Our results show a constant presence of UFP regardless of the flight activities nearby the airport. Other anthropic sources may generate UFP concentrations significantly higher than those generated by airport activities.
Key words: airborne particles, UFPs, airports, ELPI+, environmental pollution.

Last update: 5 March 2014

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert