Special Issue "Modern Trends in Legal Scholarship: Emerging Doctrines and Theories"

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A special issue of Laws (ISSN 2075-471X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lawrence O. Gostin (Website)

Georgetown University Law Center, Georgetown University, 600 New Jersey Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20001, USA
Interests: constitutional law; health law and bioethics; international human rights

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Inaugural Edition of Laws is devoted to a general examination of the theory, doctrine, and future trends of several of the foundational issues in legal scholarship. Each author is a world-class scholar eminent in his or her field. The purpose is to examine the history, current doctrine, theories, and future directions of the field as a whole. Each chapter, wherever possible, will focus on the most salient problems in the field, rather than close detailed examination of a small problem. He or she will, wherever possible, make the chapter readable and relevant to a transnational readership, so that the key ideas are not overly focused on a single country. We would like this inaugural volume to be a key reference point for scholars and the wider community interested in the field of law—as it has been, where it is today, and the directions in which it is heading.

Prof. Dr. Lawrence O. Gostin
Guest Editor

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication The State of Contracts Scholarship in the United States
Laws 2012, 1(1), 64-68; doi:10.3390/laws1010064
Received: 4 September 2012 / Revised: 6 October 2012 / Accepted: 11 October 2012 / Published: 18 October 2012
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Abstract This paper reports on the state of contracts scholarship in the United States, utilizing two methods of approximating where scholarship has focused since 2007 and where it is headed in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Trends in Legal Scholarship: Emerging Doctrines and Theories)
Open AccessArticle One Health, One World—The Intersecting Legal Regimes of Trade, Climate Change, Food Security, Humanitarian Crises, and Migration
Laws 2012, 1(1), 4-38; doi:10.3390/laws1010004
Received: 27 February 2012 / Revised: 14 March 2012 / Accepted: 19 March 2012 / Published: 4 April 2012
PDF Full-text (382 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Today’s global health challenges require a multi-sectoral approach in which health is a fundamental value within global governance and international law. “One Health, One World” provides a unified, harmonious vision of global health governance that supports the wellbeing of humans and animals [...] Read more.
Today’s global health challenges require a multi-sectoral approach in which health is a fundamental value within global governance and international law. “One Health, One World” provides a unified, harmonious vision of global health governance that supports the wellbeing of humans and animals living in a clean and temperate environment. This article focuses on five legal regimes—trade law, food security law, environmental law, humanitarian law, and refugee law—that play a pivotal role in influencing health outcomes and are integral to achieving the One Health, One World vision. International trade, for example, opens markets not only to life-saving products such as vaccines, medicines, and medical equipment, but also to life-threatening products such as tobacco and asbestos. If strengthened and enforced, environmental law can decrease air and water pollution, major causes of death and disability. World hunger has been exacerbated by the global economic crisis and climate change, increasing the urgency for international law to enhance food security. Humanitarian law must similarly be strengthened to protect civilians adequately as the nature of warfare continues to change. Refugee law plays a pivotal role in protecting the health of deeply vulnerable people who lack food, shelter, and social stability. Higher standards and more effective compliance are necessary for international law to realize its full potential to safeguard the world's population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Trends in Legal Scholarship: Emerging Doctrines and Theories)

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